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Full text of "Annual report of the town of Chelmsford"

TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 
1977 ANNUAL REPORT * 










VWK, 



Pa* 





Town 

CHE^ 




IN MEMORIUM 





PETER CURRAN 

Member of Finance Committee 1 960- 1977 



CLAUDE J. HARVEY 

Member of Planning Board 1955-1962 



Cover Design By 

Bonita A. Towle 
7 Albina Street 
Chelmsford, MA 01824 



ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 

Town of Chelmsford 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 



1977 



Printed By 



THE RENE PRESS, INC. 

245 CRAWFORD STREET, FITCHBURG, MA 01420 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Incorporated: May, 1655 

Type of Government: Town Meeting 

Location: Eastern Massachusetts, bordered by Lowell and Tyngsborough on 

the North, Billerica on the East, Carlisle on the South, and West- 
ford on the West. It is 24 miles from Boston, 40 miles from 
Worcester, and 225 miles from New York City. 

County: Middlesex 

Land Area: 22.54 Square Miles 

Population, 1975: 31,749 

Density, 1970: 1 ,394 persons per square mile 

Assessed Valuation, 1977 $264,959,525 (Real Estate) 

$10,364,400 (Personal Property) 

Tax Rate: $59.00 

United States Senators in Congress: Edward W. Brooke, Newton 

Edward M. Kennedy, Boston 
Representatives in Congress: 

5th Congressional District Paul T. Tsongas, Lowell 

State Senator: 

7th Middlesex District Carol C. Amick, Bedford 

Representative in General Court: 

43rd Middlesex District Bruce N. Freeman, Chelmsford- Precincts 1,3,5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 12 

45th Middlesex District Philip L. Shea, Lowell -Precincts 2 & 7 

47th Middlesex District Edward LeLacheur, Lowell-Precincts 4 & 1 1 

Accounting Department Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Assessors Office Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

except Monday Evenings 7:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 

(Except June, July & August) 

Building Inspector Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Board of Health Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Highway Department 

Office Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

Garage Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

Public Libraries 

Adams Library Monday thru Friday 10:00 a.m. -9:00 p.m. 

Saturdays 10:00 a.m. -6:00 p.m. 

MacKay Library Monday thru Friday 2:30 p.m. -9:00 p.m. 

Saturday 2:30 p.m. -6:00 p.m. 

School Superintendent Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

Selectmen's Office Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Town Clerk Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday Evenings 7:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 

(except June, July & August) 

Tax Collector & Treasurer Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday Evenings 7:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 

(except June, July & August) 

Veterans Agent Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

MEETINGS 

Annual Election First Saturday in April 12 Precincts 

Annual Town Meeting Last Monday in April 

Selectmen Monday- 7 : 30 P . M . Town Hall 

School Committee Tuesday-8:00 P.M. High School 

Planning Board 7:30 P.M., 2nd & 4th Wed. every month Town Hall 

AppealsBoard 7:30 P.M., 4th Thurs. every month Town Hall 

Conservation Commission 8:00 P.M., 1st & 3rd Tues. every month Town Hall 

Board of Health 7 : 30 P. M . , 2nd Tues. every month Town Hall 

Housing Authority 7:30 P.M. , 1st Tues: every month 1 Smith Street 



ELECTED TOWN OFFICIALS 

Moderator 

Daniel J. Coughlin.Jr. 
(Term Expires - 1978) 

Town Clerk 

Mary E. St. Hilaire 
(Term Expires - 1978) 

Board of Selectmen 

Thomas A. Palmer, Jr. Term expired 1977 

Philip L. Currier Term expires 1978 

William R. Murphy Term expires 1979 

Arnold J. Lovering Term expires 1979 

Paul C. Hart Term expires 1980 

Joseph B. Shanahan, Jr. Term expires 1980 

Treasurer & Tax Collecter 
Philip J. McCormack 
(Term expires - 1978) 



Board of Assessors 



Janet Lombard 
Julian H. Zabierek 
Ruth K. Delaney 
Claude A. Harvey 



Term expires 1978 

Term expires 1978 

Term expires 1980 

Retired 8/8/77 



Cemetery Commissioners 

Arthur J. Colmer Term expires 1978 

Everett V. Olsen Term expires 1979 

Gerald L. Hardy Term expires 1980 

Chelmsford Housing Authority 



Robert L. Hughes 
Claude A. Harvey 
Ruth K. Kelaney 
Richard L. Monahan 
Robert A. Sheridan 



Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1980 
Term expires 1981 
Term expires 1982 



Board of Health 



Peter Dulchinos 
Paul F. McCarthy 
Paul J. Canniff 



Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1979 
Term expires 1980 



Nashoba Valley Technical 
Vocational School District 

James M. Harrington Term expired 1977 

Stratos Dukakis Term expires 1978 

Louis E. Kelly Term expires 1979 

Jay M. Knox Term expires 1980 

Randolph W. Brumagim Term expires 1980 

Park Commissioners 

Arthur L. Bennett Term expires 1978 

Bradford O. Emerson Term expires 1979 

J. Joan Schenk Term expires 1980 

Planning Board 

Stephen D. Wojcik Term expired 1977 

Thomas E. Firth Term expires 1978 

A. Robert Raab Term expires 1979 



Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. 
Carolyn Fenn 
Ann McCarthy 
Paul F. Bartel 
Eugene Gilet 



Term expires 1979 
Term expires 1979 
Term expires 1980 
Term expires 1980 
Term expires 1981 



School Committee 



Robert D. Hall 
William J. Reynolds 
Carol C. Cleven 
Harry A. Foster 
Myra Silver 
Stanley W. Norkunas 
William Sharpley, Jr. 



Term expired 1977 
Term expired 1977 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1979 
Term expires 1980 
Term expires 1980 



Sinking Fund Commissioners 

Kenton P. Wells Term expired 1977 

Philip H. Green Term expires 1978 

Lillian Stott Term expires 1978 

Raymond L. Reynolds Term expires 1979 

Ralph House Term expires 1980 

Sewer Commissioners 

TheodoreJ. Rapallo Term expires 1978 

MatthewJ. Doyle Term expires 1979 

Charles L. Weaver Term expires 1980 

Trustees of Public Libraries 



Jean R. Mansfield 


Term expired 1977 


Audrey A. Carragher 


Term expired 1977 


Elizabeth A. McCarthy 


Term expires 1978 


Dr. Howard K. Moore 


Term expires 1978 


James M. Geary 


Term expires 1979 


Mary C. Phelan 


Term expires 1980 


Dennis E. McHugh 


Term Expires 1 980 


Constable 




William E. Spence 


Term expires 1980 


Tree Warden 




Myles Hogan 


Term expires 1978 



Varney Playground Commissioners 
Elected at Town Meeting 

Henry J. Tucker, Jr. Term expired 1977 

HarryJ. Ayotte Term expires 1978 

Bernard Battle Term expires 1978 

Robert C. McManimon Term expires 1979 

William Dempster, Jr. Resigned 



APPOINTED TOWN OFFICIALS 

Town Accountant 

Ernest F. Day Term expires 1978 

Board of Selectmen, Administrative Assistant 

Evelyn M. Haines Term Expires 1978 

Town Counsel 

James M. Harrington Term expires 1978 



Chief of Police 

Robert E. Germann 



Fire Chief 

Frederick H. Reid 



Cemetery Superintendent 

George E. Baxendale Term expires 1978 

Park Superintendent 

Donald P. Gray Term expires 1978 

Director of Public Health 

Thomas W. Morris Term expires 1978 

Board of Health Physician 

Michael A. Gilchrist, M.D. Term expires 1978 

Superintendent of Streets 

Louis R. Rondeau Term expires 1978 

Special Constable 
Joseph D. Nyhan 

Inspector of Animals 

Dr. Martin A. Gruber Term expires 1978 

Building Inspector 

Peter J. McHugh, Jr. Term expires 1978 

Gas Inspector 

Neal C. Stanley Term expires 1978 

Plumbing Inspector Intermittent Plumbing Inspector 

William H. Shedd / Richard M. Kelly 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 
Anthony C. Ferreira 

Town Aide & Council on Aging 
Kathleen Robinson 

Assistant Town Clerk Assistant Assessors 

Elizabeth Delaney Zamanakos Evelyn M. Philbrook 

Gail S. Minns 

Assistant Treasurer 
Florence M. RAmsay 

Planning Board Clerk Zoning Appeal Board Clerk 

Judith E. Carter Velma Munroe 

Veteran's Grave Officer 

George E. Baxendale Term expires 1978 

Wiring Inspector 

Harold M. Tucke, Jr. 



Recreation Director 

Richard Sargent 



Town Planner 

Ken Carney 



Finance Committee 

Marvin Schenk Term expires 1978 

William Edge Term expires 1978 

Richard Sullivan Term expires 1978 

Kathryn E. Hughes Term expires 1979 

James A. Decker Term expires 1979 



George Ripsom 
Thomas F. Markham.Jr. 
Richard McDermott 



Term expires 1980 

Term expires 1980 

Resigned 



Zoning Appeal Board 



S. Robert Monaco 
Robert Kydd 
Marshall Arkin 
Carolyn Bennett 
Charles Higgins 



Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1980 
Term expires 1980 
Term expires 1981 



Alternates 

Joseph Dappal Daniel Burke 

Florence Kelley 



Council on Aging 



Gula Boyce 
Christina Ahem 
Louise Bishop 
Clarence Dane 
Sara Dunigan 
H. Chadbourne Ward 



Lillian Gould 

Mary McAuliffe 

Edna Nelson 

Kathleen Robinson 

William Marston 



Crystal Lake Restoration Committee 

Edmund Polubinski Paul C. Hart 

Thomas E. Firth, Jr. Peter Dulchinos 

Robert C. McManimon Robert R. Gagnon 

John J. Kenney Haworth Neild 

Lowell Drug Treatment - "Share" 

Donald Butler Edward Fallon 

Marion Yonge 

Cable Television Advisory Committee 

F. D. Cavallari Richard Arcand 

Robert McAdam John Carson 

Harold Witt Robert Brooks 

J. Alan Moyer (Resigned) Stanley Norkunas 

Susan Schleigh Christos Tournas 

(Library Rep.) (School Dept. Rep.) 

Revolutionary War Bicentennial Commission 



George A. Parkhurst 
JohnC. Alden 
Walter R. Hedlund 
J. Perry Richardson 
Charles Marderosian 



Richard Lahue 



Audrey Carragher 

Anna Normand 

MaryJ. Guaraldi 

Hedwig Zabierik 

Janet Lombard 



Youth Center Advisory Committee 

Janet Greeno Wendell Luke 

George Weinert William Murphy 

Judy Harrison Phillis Dougherty 

JoAnn Weisman Trudy Wall 

Everett Brown Martha Doukszewicz 

Jay Finnegan Norman Douglas 

Michael Gilchrist Robert Hall 
Brian Sullivan 

Alternates 

Carol Gilchrist Joanne Weinert Vicent Harrison 



Youth Center Coordinator 

James R. Woodman 

Historical Commission 

J. Perry Richardson Term expires 1978 

George Parkhurst Term expires 1978 

Jane Drury Term expires 1978 

John Alden Term expires 1979 

Richard Lahue Term expires 1979 

Bertha Trubey Term expires 1980 

Mary Guaraldi Resigned 

John D. Hamilton Term expires 1980 

Historic District Commission 

Stephen Wojcik Term expires 1979 

Richard Lahue, Sr. Term expires 1980 

Dr. Paul Caniff Term expires 1980 

Robert LaPorte, Jr. Term expires 1980 

J. Perry Richardson Term expires 1980 

Fence Viewers 

Reginald Furness Esq. 
Richard D. Harper 



Highway Administrative Ass't 
Pearl Koulas 



CETA - Coordinator 

Ralph House 



Veteran's Agent 

Mary McAuliffe 

Director Veterans Services 

William R. Murphy 



Veteran's Emergency Fund Committee 

Dr. Albert Willis Thomas A. Ennis 

Victor Fetro Kenneth A. Cooke 

JamesJ. Walker Peter J. Saulis 

John J. McNulty Malvin Dejager 

George F. Waite Herbert T. Knutson 

Alfred H. Coburn Gerard A. Vayo 

Personnel Board 

DavidJ. McLachlan 

Peter Vennard 
Michael L. Fabien 

Recreation Commission 

Robert Charpentier John Peters 

Harry Ayotte Joan Murray 

Paul Murphy Thomas Trainor 

Anthony Bruno, Jr. 

Summer Director: Donald Babin 

Assistant: Evelyn Newman 

Home Rule Advisory Committee 

Jean Paul J. Gravell Carol Stark 

Denis Valdinocci James Frieder 

Richard Burtt Catherine Seminatore 

Ronald McMaster (Resigned) Charles Spear (Resigned) 



Weighers of Merchandise 

George Fournier Leo Gendron 

Ted Magiera Francis Sakalinski 

Paul Westwood Joseph Bobola 

Charles Hacking Alec Coluchi 

Lillian Cabana Marcel Marion 

Tom Long Alejandrino Quiles 

Environmental Advisory Council 
Steering Committee 

Ina Greenblatt Gene Roberts 

Donald Caless Mary Wadman 

Dr. Ethel Kamien Gerald Locker 

Diane Lewis Michael Zymaris 

Police Station Addition Committee 

Robert E. Germann Paul V. Lahaise 

Bernard L. George Peter McHugh, Jr. 

JohnH. Kelly, Jr. 

Town Celebration Committee 

Walter Hedlund James Gifford 

Raymond Day Dana P. Caffelle 

Board of Registrars 

Edward Hilliard Term expires 1980 

Michael Devine Term expires 1979 

Herbert Bennett Term expires 1978 

Robert Noble Resigned 

Mary E. St. Hilaire - Ex-Officio 

Captial Planning & Budgeting Committee 

Edward G. Krasnecki Thomas E. Firth 

Ira S. Parks A. Robert Raab 

Civil Defense Committee 

Walter R. Hedlund Walter Edwards, Jr. 

George R. Dixon Melvin P. Dejager 

GeorgeJ. Brown Joseph E. Staveley 

Conservation Commission 

John McCormack Term expires 1 980 

Frank Siraco Term expires 1980 

John Balco Term expires 1979 

David Merrill Term expires 1979 

Donald House Term expires 1979 

Charles Parlee Term expires 1978 

EdwardJ. Duffy Term expires 1978 

Community Teamwork 

Kathleen Robinson 

Town Forest Committee 

Charles Parlee EdwardJ. Duffy 

Donald House 

East Chelmsford Fire Station Building Committee 

Walter Hedlund Edward Quinn 

Frederick Reid George Dixon 

Edward Hoyt 



North Middlesex Area Commission's 

Philip L. Currier Selectmen's Rep. 

Daniel Burke Alternate 

U.N. Day Chairman 
Bernard J. Battle 

Special Police Officers 
For School Traffic Duty 

Janet Connor Patricia Dearborn 

Carol Souza Laretta Weaver 

Marie LaTouche Cheryl Berthiaume 

Estelle Abeley Jean MacPhail 



Dog Officer 

Frank Wojtas 



Ass't Dog Officer 
Stacia Wojtas 



Industrial Development Financing Authority 

Walter Dronzek Hendrick Johnson Jr . 

Bradford Emerson Thomas A. Palmer, Jr. 

Gerald Wallace 

Labor Relations Advisory 

Murphy, Lamere & Murphy 



Police Matrons 



Mary Long 
Emily Peake 



Grace Auger 
Nora Clifford 



custodians of Public Buildings 

Robert Sheridan (Resigned) Town Hall 

John P. Curran Police Station 

School Building Committee 



Robert M. Sexton, Jr. 
Anthony S. DeProfio 
Richard C. Miller 
James A. Sullivan 



Paul Krenitsky 

Harry F. McKeon, Jr. 

CarolC. Cleven 

Carol A. DeCarolis 



LeoJ. Silva 
Timothy F. O'Connor 
Al Ryan 
Anthony Succo 



Representatives Post 336 
Representatives Post 313 



Department of Public Works Study Committee 

Gerald Silver Richard Russell 

George Auchy HenryJ. McClean 

Barbara Langworthy Robert J. Monroe, Sr. 

Joan Schenk Philip Currier, Sel. Rep. 

Insurance Advisory Committee 

Roger Welch Henrick Johnson 

Walter Hedlund Peter Dow 

William J. Hennessy 

Ration Board 

Arnold J. Lovering 
Charles Koulas 
Paul McMillan 

Four-C's Committee 

Alice Gossett 

Finance Committee/Board of Selectmen 
Communication-Sub Committee 

William Murphy Selectman Rep. 

Richard Sullivan Finance Comm. Rep. 

Personnel Board/Sel./Fin. Comm. /School Committee 
Personnel Sub-Committee 

Philip L. Currier 

Senior Citizen's Drop-In Center Committee 

Louise Bishop Edward H. Hcod 

Gula Boyce William R. Marson 

Philip Currier Selectman Rep. 



Louis Murray 



Comprehensive Permitting Committee 

Dr. Paul Canniff Henrick Johnson 

Donald House Peter J. McHugh, Jr. 

William R. Murphy Carol Stark 

Daniel Burke 

Town-Wide Cultural Committee 

Christos Simorellis Chris Stavros 

Evelyn L. Newman MarieJ. Geary 

Kathleen Schnorr Maureen Creegan 

Marjorie Sargent Glen Goodsoozian 

Marian Ward Mary Guaraldi 

William Hynes Richard L. Meaney 

Sally J. Wolfe Rod Morrison 

Mitchell Korbey Jeanne E. Glenfield 

Fredi Scutt Thomas G. Elliot 

Moses Paul Ward Irene J. Meaney 

Memorial Day Committee for the Year 1977 

Harry F. Silveria 

Donald House Representatives Post 212 




BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



At the Board's organizational meeting on April 4, 
1977, following the Annual Town Election, Philip L. 
Currier was elected as Chairman of the Board. Other 
members of the Board are William R. Murphy, Vice- 
Chairman; Joseph B. Shanahan, Jr., Clerk; Arnold J. 
Lovering and Paul C. Hart. 

Highlights of the year's activities are included in the 
following paragraphs: 

As the Licensing Authority, the Board held its regular 
hearings on the issuance of various licenses and also 
renewed licenses which come under their jurisdiction. 

In accordance with Chapter 1 140 and Chapter 825, the 
Board authorized the reconstruction of Fletcher Street 
and awarded contracts for the following drainage 
projects: Coolidge Street, North Road at Linwood Street, 
Janet Road, Swain Road, High Street, and Dunstable 
Road. 

In order to attempt to correct other drainage problems 
in Town, Engineering Studies and cost estimates are 
being prepared for a warrant article in the 1978 Annual 
Town Meeting Warrant. 

The Westford/Chelmsford Town Line Problem at 
Horseshoe Road has been resolved and awaits Town 
Meeting action from Westford, as well as legislative 
action. 

The property at the Swain Road Landfill has been 
surveyed and marked. Work is progressing towards 
meeting the criteria for compliance set by the 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in accordance with 
the Camp, Dresser & McKee report of 1978. 

At the direction of Town Meeting, a School Sidewalk 
Program was undertaken in conjunction with the School 
Department. Progress of the designated areas is as 
follows: 

The sidewalk at the South Row School, along Boston 

Road has been completed. 

Wildes Road, from Boston Road to Janet Road is 

under construction. 

Contracts for Westford Street at Bridge Street; 

Summer Street; from Brook Street to Billerica Road; 

Chelmsford Street, from Glen Avenue to Manahan 

Street; and Dalton Road, Evergreen Street to Sunset 

Avenue have been awarded and work should be 

completed in the early Spring. 

Plans, specifications and contracts are ready for Mill 

Road, from the South Row School to Raymond Road 

and Stedman Street, from Chelmsford Street to Dalton 

Road and will be advertised for bid as soon as weather 

permits. 

The Community had the opportunity to vote on the 
issue of the Town securing full-time professional 
management through a Charter Petition or a Special Act 
of the Legislature. The electorate voted not to support 
this question, as a result the Selectmen did not pursue this 
matter further. 

In accordance with the Mandatory Recycling Article 
approved at the 1977 Annual Town Meeting, Selectman 



Arnold J. Lovering has coordinated the implementation 
of this program which is expected to commence during 
the month of April. 

Bids were received ana awarded to Falzarano 
Construction for the renovation of the School House on 
Mill Road which will be utilized as a Senior Citizens' 
Drop-In Center. 

Crystal Lake filled with water during the early Spring 
which required some additional work by the Contractor. 
It became necessary to make some minor repairs to the 
dam as a result of some cracking in the concrete and the 
cleaning of debris which floated to the top of the Lake. 
Also, the Division of Fisheries and Wildlife stocked the 
Lake with Largemouth Black Bass. 

As the Town Meeting voted funds for a professional 
evaluation of the Police Department, the Selectmen 
advertised the position and appointed Robert Sheehan, 
of Sheehan Associates, Medway. The report will be 
completed and available in June. 

The Board formally adopted the Police Rules and 
Regulations for the Chelmsford Police Department 
prepared by the Massachusetts Police Institute. 

In view of the fact that Graniteville Road was laid out 
by the Middlesex County in 1896, but was not approved 
by the County Commissioners at that time, the Selectmen 
requested that this street be formally laid out and 
approved by the County Commissioners in order that 
sidewalks could be installed. The County Commissioners 
have scheduled a hearing for early Spring. 

On May 9th, the Board declared a State of Emergency 
in view of the unusual snow storm which occurred. There 



was considerable damage to property and trees. Many 
areas of the Community lost electric power for several 
days. It took many weeks for a contractor and the Town 
to remove the brush. 

Under the CETA Program, the Board approved 
several positions and projects. There are some 64 
employees under this program. Some of the positions and 
projects created are as follows: Recycling Co-Ordinator; 
Special Projects Assistant; Energy Co-Ordinator; School 
Security Guards; Secretarial positions; Library Aide; 
Town Planner; Purchasing Agent; Inventory Control; 
Drainage Alleviation and Park Beautification; Housing 
Needs. 

Due to the death of Roger Boyd, the Selectmen met 
with the Housing Authority and jointly appointed John 
Manning to fill the vacancy. 

Also, due to the retirement of Claude Harvey, the 
Selectmen met with the Board of Assessors and jointly 
appointed Julian Zabierek to fill the vacancy. 

The Board has continued its active role in the 
Massachusetts Selectmens' Association; Merrimack 
Valley Selectmens' Association; Middlesex County 
Advisory Board; and Massachusetts League of Cities and 
Towns. 

Walter Hedlund, Civil Defense Director and Chairman 
of the Fourth of July Parade Committee was nominated 
by the Town Employees and chosen by the Selectmen as 
the Outstanding Municipal Employee. 

We wish to take this opportunity to commend 
Departments, Committees, Commissions and Boards for 
their accomplishments during this past year. 



10 




/""*» 



11 





12 



TOWN CLERK 



Mary E. St. Hilaire, Town Clerk 
Elizabeth Delaney Zamanakos, Ass't Town Clerk 

LICENSES AND VITAL RECORDS 



Sporting 


Dog 


Kennel 


Marriage 


Recorded 


Licenses 


Licenses 


Licenses 


Intentions 


Mortgages, Etc. 


1259 


2588 


12 


255 


473 



Births 

(Incomplete) 

285 



Marriages 
320 



Deaths 

224 



1977 JURORS DRAWN 



The following names were drawn from the 76-77 list 



75 
68 
55 
39 
35 
34 
37 
85 
60 
32 
66 
50 

7 
22 
28 
41 
72 
43 
48 
57 
70 

5 

6 
11 
29 
30 
40 
62 
14 

9 
31 



list. 


47 


1/03/77 


15 


1/03/77 


27 


1/03/77 


54 


1/03/77 


56 


1/03/77 


24 


1/03/77 


13 


1/24/77 


10 


1/24/77 


74 


1/24/77 


83 


1/24/77 


26 


1/24/77 


52 


1/24/77 


64 


2/22/77 


61 


2/22/77 


58 


2/22/77 


92 


2/22/77 




2/22/77 


Th 


3/22/77 


88 


3/22/77 


94 


3/22/77 


19 


3/22/77 


84 


4/19/77 


74 


4/19/77 


24 


4/19/77 


61 


4/19/77 


78 


4/19/77 


18 


5/23/77 


53 


6/06/77 


95 


6/06/77 


25 


7/19/77 


81 


7/19/77 


90 



7/19/77 

8/12/77 

8/12/77 

8/12/77 

8/12/77 

8/12/77 

9/19/77 

9/19/77 

9/19/77 

9/19/77 

9/19/77 

10/24/77 

10/24/77 

10/24/77 

10/24/77 

10/24/77 

The following names were drawn from the 77-78 list. 

11/21/77 
11/21/77 
11/21/77 
11/21/77 
11/21/77 
11/21/77 
11/21/77 
12/19/77 
12/19/77 
12/19/77 
12/19/77 
12/19/77 
12/19/77 
12/19/77 

67 12/19/77 



13 



1976-1977 JURY LIST 



Mame and Address 



Occupation 



CALVIN P. ALLEN, 6 Hronbeam Hill Road 

EVERETT L. ASHE, 24 Overlook Drive 

PETER L. BARD, 180 Tyngsboro Road 

MELVIN E. BEAN, 163 Old Westford Road 

GRACE BEERS, 105 Warren Avenue 

ENID BERNARDI, 8 Queen Street 

MADELINE P. BRENDEL, 137 Mill Road 

MARYLEES BROSTOWIN, lOJanet Road 

OLIVE BROWN, 25 Mission Road 

EDWARD BUCKLEY, 28 Sprague Avenue 

VICTOR CARIGNAN, 159 Tungsboro Road 

LELAND F. CARR, 1 Alamo Circle 

WALTER K. CETARUK, 20 Singlefoot Road 

WALTER F. CHASE, 10 Lancaster Avenue 

ARTHUR CLOUGH, 6 Pecas Circle 

JOHN P. CON ANT, 5 Herbert Road 

MARILYN D. COWAN, 270 Littleton Road 

MAURICE CRONIN, 4 Algonquin Road 

ANNEJ. CUNNINGHAM, 30 Robert Bigelow Street 

DAVID F. CUSHING, 15 Trotting Road 

JOSEPH DAPPAL, 8 Topeka Road 

IRENE DEWARE, 5 Gelding Road 

PAUL R. DRAGON, 117 Graniteville Road 

KENNETH P. DUMAIS, 11 Spaulding Road 

LUCY M. EVANS, 15 Porter Road 

WILLIAM E. FLYNN, 87 Pine Hill Road 

WILLIAM J. FULTON, 144 High Street 

GREGORY L. GARDNER, 10 Footpath Road 

RICHARD J. GAVIN, SR., 6 Monument Hill Road 

ROBERT A. GILINSON, 8 Fuller Road 

LOIS M. GOODICK, 225 Acton Road 

ROBERTA. GRAY, JR., 11 Horseshoe Road 

EMMA G. HANSEN, 9 Arbor Road 

OSWALD G. HAYES, JR. , 18 Sprague Avenue 

FRANCES E. HILL, 14 Carriage Drive 

JAMES C. HUFFMAN, 35 Abbott Lane 

MARY K. HUBBARD, 25 Robin Hill Road 

MARY A. HURLBURT, 93 Richardson Road 

GORDON F. ISLEIB, 14 Sleigh Road 

PAUL J. KAMPAS, 1 1 Trotting Road 

CLAIRE M. KELLY, 61 High Street 

JOSEPHINE KOKOSKA, 30 Arbor Road 

JEAN KYDD, 71 Elm Street 

ARM AND LALIBERTE, 19 Chatham Road 

JANET M. LANGENFELD, 8 Coach Road 

MARIE B. LATOUCHE, 196 North Road 

RUSSELL C. LAWSON, 70 Boston Road 

HAROLD A. LECCESE, 8 Howard Road 

JEAN C. LONG, 12 Berkshire Road 

JOHN T. LUEBBERS, JR., 17 Hitchinpost Road 

NEOMA FAY MACKEY, 6 Princess Avenue 

FRANCIS D. MALONEY, 12 Laredo Drive 

RUTH F. MARSHALL, Sleigh Road 

SHARON V. MCGRATH, 140 Dalton Road 



Laborer 

Sales 

Ele. Technician 

Inspector 

Clerk 

Support Technician 

Group Leader 

Engineer 

Courier Cit. Clerk 

Mechanic 

Fork Lift Operator 

Contracting Officer 

Elec. Engineer 

Retired 

Ind. Engineer 

Mech. Engineer 

Office Worker 

Carpenter 

Assembler 

Engineer 

Gen. Manager 

Secretary 

Accountant 

Receiver 

Housewife 

Designer 

Retired 

Project Mgr. 

Job Analyst 

Elec. Engineer 

Housewife 

Engineer 

Housewife 

Engineer 

Housewife 

Mathmetician 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Engineer 

Engineer 

Housewife 

Secretary 

Housewife 

Air Traffice Control 

Housewife 

Hair Stylist 

Cab Driver 

Engineer 

Housewife 

Salesman 

Assembler 

Field Engineer 

Elec. Assembler 

Secretary 



14 



57. JOANNE L. NICHOLSON, 13 Temi Road 

58. WILLIAM H. PALMER, JR., 300 Old Westford Road 

59. WILLIAM PESTANA, 57 Manning Road 

60. VICENZA PHELPS, 30 Worthen Street 

61. AUSTIN J. RALLS, 64 Dunstable Road 

62. LOUISE I. REMICK, 219 Westford Road 

63. JUTTA I. RICHARDS, 13 Ranch Road 

64. NORMAN H. RUSSELL, 216 Grainteville Road 

65. BETTY A. SCRIBNER, 14 Brentwood Road 

66. JAMES A. SEYBOLD, 8 Richardson Road 

67. MURIEL C. SIDEL, 9 Horseshoe Road 

68. THOMAS E. SIMMONS, 17 Cove Street 

69. FRANK G. SNOOK, 172 Proctor Road 

70. WAYNE A. SOUSA, 8Jerridge Lane 

71. KAREN SWEENEY, 4 Lord Road 

72. SUSAN M. TRAINOR, 20 Stearns Street 

73. FAITH ANN TUCKE, 67 North Road 

74. DAVID B. ULLOM, 11 Sunset Avenue 

75. SHERWOOD WARREN, 12 Walnut Road 

76. EDWARD R. WHITWORTH SR. , 37 Harding Street 

77. RACHEL E. WINSHIP, 117 Westford Street 

78. BYRON ZAKOS, 231 Groton Road 

79. HENRY R. ZUKOWSKI, 123 Groton Road 

80. FRANCES B. WILKINSON, 328 Old Westford Road 

81. JAMES J. TANSEY, 6 Mount Pleasant 

82. DOLORES H. STROBL, 46 Hornbeam Hill Road 

83. ELIZABETH M. STANTON, 270 Littleton Road 

84. ANDREW F. SHEEHAN, 221B Pine Hill Road 

85. MARILYN L. PYNE, 10 Prancing Road 

86. SAMUEL L. OTTEY, 314 Old Westford Road 

87. KENNETH A. O'BRIEN, 7 Muriel Road 

88. WILLIAM O'HARA, 17 Baldwin Road 

89. MINGTZER M.T. MIU, 5 Chestnut Hill Road 

90. IRENE A. McHUGH, 126 Pine Hill Road 

91. SUSAN L. MCCARTHY, 5 Mission Road 

92. RICHARD H. McCALL, 15 Sleigh Road 

93. DEBORAH MARCAURELLE, 3 Maple Avenue 

94. CHARLES M. LEHAN, SR, 17 Parlee Road 



Claims Clerk 

Sheet Metal Worker 

Shipper 

Banker 

Business Manager 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Sales Executive 

Housewife 

Mechanic 

Clerk 

Engineer 

Supervisor 

Truck Driver 

Cashier 

Assembler 

Lab Technician 

Lowell Gas 

Coordinator 

Retired 

Housewife 

Truck Driver 

Machinist 

Cashier 

Janitor 

Housewife 

Secretary 

Electrician 

Housewife 

Retired 

CPA 

Salesman 

Engineer 

Housewife 

Clerk Typist 

Supervisor 

Housewife 

Service Foreman 



1977-1978 JURY LIST 



Name and Address 



1. JOHN R. ABBOTT, 159 Dunstable Road 

2. ROBERT E. ACHESON, 26 School Street 

3. MARY R. ALLABY, 20 Marina Road 

4. NEILJ. ANDERSON, 23 Muriel Road 

5. THELMA ANTONOPOULOS, 3 New Fletcher Street 

6. ROBERT J. ARCHAMBAULT, 19 Mission Road 

7. ARLAND A. ATKINS, 171 Mill Road 

8. DOMCIA M. AZAROWSKI, 14 Gorham Street 

9. JEAN M. BAGSHAW, 15 Ideal Avenue 

10. CHARLES E. BALLANTINE, 31 Golden Cove Road 

1 1 . AGNES T. BARON , 1 9 Gail Street 

12. MONICA BARRON, 11 Edgelawn Avenue 

13. ROBERT C. BEALS, 12 Racks Road 

14. CONRAD G. BEAUPRE, 15 Coolidge Street 

15. MARION M. BENNETT, 152 Dalton Road 

16. JOHN R. BIRO, 162 Main Street 



Occupation 

Carpenter 
Machinist 
Manager 
Teamster 
Housewife 
Supervisor Superintendent 
Opt. Eng. 

Stitcher ' 

Secretary 

Cinematographer 

Housewife 

Adm. Assistant 

Engineer 

Unemployed 

Housewife 

Engineer 



15 



EVELYN M. BOHL, 4 Green Valley Drive 
LEO A. BOUCHER, 30 Ruthellen Road 
JANICE R. BRIGHAM, 11 Bentley Lane 
BARBARA H. BROE, 14 Singlefoot Road 
ERVINJ. BROWN, 12 Pine Street 
MARJORIEE. BROWN, 19 Cedar Street 



17. 
18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 

23. DONALD J. BY AM, 40 Sleigh Road 

24. STEWART H. CADY, 180 Tungsboro Road 

25. DANIEL F. CALLAHAN, 18 Arbor Road 

26. BETSEY B. CAMBELL, 1 Smith Street Apt. 116A 

27. MARIE V. CARIGNAN, 159 Tyngsboro Road 

28. KAREN H. CARPENTER, 134 Boston Road 

29. FRANCIS M. CARRICK, 1 3 Carleton Avenue 

30. JUNE L. CHAGNON, 4 Pine Hill Road 

31 . HERBERT A. CHILDS, 9 Rivermeadow Drive 

32. EVELYN G. CHRISTIANSEN, 12 Thomas Drive 

33. BERNARD V. CLARK, 1 1 Sharon Avenue 

34. MARY G. CLARK, 27 Rainbow Avenue 

35. ALICE G. COALTER, 25 Quigley Avenue 

36. WILLARD S. COLBY, 61 Amble Road 

37. IRENE H. COLLINS, 11 Chestnut Hill Road 

38. JEAN CONNELL, 9 Rainbow Avenue 

39. JEANETTE E. COOPOER, 16 Longmeadow Road 

40. KENNETHJ. CORCORAN, 201 Dalton Road 

41 . CELINE F. COSTELLO, 75 Proctor Road 

42. HELENA G. COUTO, 66 Meadowbrook Road 

43. FRANCIS X. COYLE, 21 Chatham Road 

44. FREDERICKJ. CRONIN, 50 Grandview Road 

45. HAROLDJ. DAVIS 

46. MARION DEMPSEY, 5 Skyview Drive 

47. ELAINE B. DIONNE, 9 Anise Road 

48. WILLIAM F. DONAHUE, JR., 8 Julio Street 

49. JOHN A. DUBEY, JR., 45 Dunstan Road 

50. JAMESJ. DURKIN, JR., 8 McFarlin Road 

51 . FRANCIS E. EGAN, 23 Sprague Avenue 

52. ANTHONY FAFALIOS, 1 1 Janet Road 

53. DONALD J. FIDLER, 34 North Road 

54. JOHN F. FLYNN, 14 Naylor Street 

55. ERIC C. FOSTER, 13 Manwell Road 

56. KATHLEEN A. GAUDETTE, 41 Walnut Road 

57. SUSAN GEORGE, 30 Second Street 

58. MARY E. GILIKSON, 270 Littleton Road 

59. EDWARD H. HARHAUSEN, 9 Manhattan Drive 

60. JOHN F. HAYES, 3 Churchill Road 

61. FRED C. HEINTZ, 7 Ruthellen Road 

62. JOHN P. HICKEY, 23 Bradford Road 

63. RUTH E. HINDLE, 12 Sunrise Avenue 

64. HOWARD G. HUNTER, 8 Herbert Road 

65. RANDY KEATING, 35 Vinal Square 

66. HARLAN P. KELLY, 10 Hildreth Street 

67. ELIZABETH B. KEY, 15 Berkeley Drive 

68. ROBERT B. KNOWLES, 40 Walnut Road 

69. PAUL KRENITSKY, 12 Draycoach Road 

70. JOSEPH A. LaTOUCHE, 196 North Road 

71. ANN LEACH, Richardson Apts. Bll, N.Ch., Richardson Road 

72. DONALD MacPHAIL, 180 Tyngsboro Road 

73. ROBERT MAITLAND, 270 Littleton Road 

74. GEORGE T. MANSUR, 54 Old Stage Road 



Therapist 

Accountant 

Secretary 

Housewife 

Jeweler 

Wire Solderer 

Presser 

Laborer 

Assistant Plant Manager 

Retired 

Creeler 

Consultant 

Supervisor 

Housewife 

Division Sales Manager 

Housewife 

Foundry Worker 

Buyer 

Packer 

Service Representative 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Assistant Service Manager 

Housewife 

Bank Clerk 

Mathmatician 

Accountant 

Retired 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Executive Assistant 

Self-employed 

Manager 

Bricklayer 

Baker 

Computer Operator 

Minister 

Plumber 

Solderer 

Clerk 

Trimmer 

Chief Engineer 

Industrial Engineer 

Salesman 

Bank Manager 

Retired 

Civil Engineer 

Gas Station 

Business 

Housewife 

Adm. Aide 

Technical Sta. 

Hair Stylist 

Laborer 

Carpenter 

Electrical Inspector 



16 



75. FREDERICK L. MAYS, Jr., 10 Walnut Road 

76. EDWARD J. McNULTY, 20 Freeman Road 

77. ROSA E. MELLOW, 71 Brick Kiln Road 

78. LINDA L. MILLER, 26 Parlee Road 

79. MARY B. MORAIS, 18 Castlewood Drive 

80. NORMAND L. MORRISSETTE, 11 Stoneybrook Road 

81 . FRANCES A. MULLEN, 350 Boston Road 

82. ALLEN D. NELSON, SR., 5 Hidden Way 

83. JOHN J. NICOLI, 8 Clark Avenue 

84. WILLIAM PIERRO, 13 Walnut Road 

85. GEORGE W.P. PUCCIARELLI, SR., 32 Kensington Drive 

86. NANCY REBBERT, 35 Dalton Road 

87. NORMAN H. RUSSELL, 216 Graniteville Road 

88. DARREL R. SANDERS, 87 North Road 

89. JOHN A. SCALI, 11 Oak Knoll Avenue 

90. MARK E. SCHWARZ, JR. , 15 Castlewood Drive 

91 . IRENE SIGVARDSON, 8 Frank Street 

92. KEVIN W. SIMPSON, 53 Stedman 

93. FRANCES L. SMAIDONE, 10 Larssen Circle 

94. MICHAEL P. SOUSA, 8 Pleasant Avenue 

95. ELIZABETH A. St. CLAIR, 270 Littleton Road 

96. BARBARA F. STONE, 5 Sleeper Street 

97. EDWARD M. SULLIVAN, 3 Prairie Road 

98. ALAN E. TUCKER, 8 Cathy Road 

99. MILDRED WEINSTEIN, 7 Murray Hill Road 
100. DAVID R. WILCOX, 205 Graniteville Road 



Machinist 

Auto Machinist 

Office Work 

At Home 

Housewife 

Traffic Supervisor 

Assembly 

Manager 

Pipe Fitter 

Construction Worker 

Retired 

Housewife 

Sales Exec. 

Chemist 

Clerk 

Programmer 

Assembler 

Packer 

Housewife 

Accountant 

Clerk 

Telephone Operator 

Engineer 

Cust. Engineer 

Housewife 

Pub. Acct. 



WARRANT FOR THE 
ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
April 2, 1977, and April 25, 1977 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford to meet in their several polling places, 
viz: 

Precinct 1 . McFarlin School - All Purpose Room 

Precinct 2. North Elementary School Auditorium 

Precinct 3. Colonel Moses Parker Junior High School 

Band Room 

Precinct 4. East Chelmsford School 

Precinct 5. Byam School Cafetorium 

Precinct 6. Westlands School Cafeteria 

Precinct 7. North Elementary School Auditorium 

Precinct 8. Small Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy 

Junior High School 

Precinct 9. South Row School Auditorium 

Precinct 10. South Row School Auditorium 

Precinct 1 1 . Westlands School Cafeteria 

Precinct 12. Fire House - Old Westford Road 



On Saturday, the second day of April, 1977, being the 
first Saturday in said month, at 8:00 A.M., for the 
following purposes: 

To bring in their votes for the following officers: 

Two Selectmen for three years 

One Assessor for three years 

One member of Board of Health for three years 

Two members of School Committee for three years 

Two members of Nashoba Valley Technical High School 

District Committee for three years 
One Cemetery Commissioner for three years 
One Cemetery Commissioner for two years to fill vacancy 
One member of Housing Authority for five years 
Two Public Library Trustees for three years 
One Park Commissioner for three years 
One Planning Board member for three years 
One Planning Board member for four years 
One Sewer Commissioner for three years 
One Sinking Fund Commissioner for three years 
One Sinking Fund Commissioner for one year to fill 

vacancy 
One Constable for three years 



QUESTION; 

"Shall the Board of Selectmen initiate action to secure 
full-time professional management for the town either 
through a charter petition drive or a special act of the 



17 



legislature to be approved by town meeting prior to its 
submission?" 

Yes 

No 

The polls will be open from 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M.; 
and to meet in the McCarthy Junior High School 
Gymnasium on Monday the twenty-fifth day of April, 
1977 at 7:30 P.M. o'clock in the evening, then and there 
to act upon the following articles, viz: 

ARTICLE 1. To hear reports of Town Officers and 
Committees; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to further 
amend Section 24, subtitled "Job Titles and Standard 
Rates for Wages and Salaries of the Personnel Wage and 
Salary By-Law" by adding the following positions 
Administrative and Clerical - Line 12. Superintendent of 
Engineering Operations; Library - Line 8. Supervisor - 
Maintenance; Town Fire Department - Line 3. 
Mechanic; Town Police Department - Line 3. Mechanic; 
by deleting under Recreation - Line 3. Swimming 
Director; Line 4. Swimming Instructor; and adding 
under Recreation the following positions: Line 3. Water 
Safety Instructor/Director; Line 4. Life 
Guard/Swimming Instructor; or act in relation thereto. 



Personnel Board 

ARTICLE 2A. To see if the Town will vote to furhter 
amend Section 24, subtitled "Job Titles and Standard 
Rates for Wages and Salaries of the Personnel Wage and 
Salary By-Law", to conform to rates of pay negotiated by 
the Town with certain labor organizations, pursuant to 
General Laws, Chapter 150E. 



A. ADMINISTRATIVE AND CLERICAL 

1 . Veteran's Agent 

2. Clerk Senior 

3. Clerk 

4. Town Accountant 

5. Assistant Treasurer 

6. Town Counsel 

7. Selectmen's Administrative 

Assistant 

8. Board of Registrar's Clerk 

9. Board of Registrars, three 

members 

10. Clerk. Part time 

11. Town Aide 



B. CONSERVATION. PARKS AND CEMETERY 

1. Cemetery Superintendent $14,445.00 p. a. $* 

2. Superintendent of Insect & 

Pest Control $ 1,250.00 p. a. $• 

3. Landscaper - Park > 4.19 hr. $* 



Current 


Recommended 


1976-1977 


Fisca 


July 1, 1977 


jERICAL. 
$10,600.00 p. a. 




$** 


$ 8,468.00 p. a. 




$" 


$ 6,750.00 p.a. 




$** 


$15,954.00 p. a. 




$" 


$ 9,687.00 p.a. 




$" 


$ 500.00 




$** 


$11,770.00 p.a. 




$" 


$ 850.00 p.a. 




$** 


$ 360.00 ea. 




$** 


$ 3.42 hr. 




$** 


$ 8.615.00 p.a. 




$*♦ 



4. Laborer - Park 


$ 


3.83 hr. 


$ 


5. Unskilled Laborer 


$ 


2.30 hr. 


$ 


6. Skilled Forest Workman 


$ 


3.14 hr. 


$ 


7. Equipment Operator - 








Park 


$ 


4.53 hr. 


$ 


8. Park Superintendent 


$14,445.00 p.a. 


$ 


C. CUSTODIAL 








1. Custodian 


$ 


3.78 hr. 


$ 


D. LIBRARY 








1. Librarian MLS 


$16,000.00 p.a. 


$ 


2. Librarian MLS (Assistant) 


$10,826.00 p.a. 


$ 


3. Branch Librarian 


$ 9 


122.00 p.a. 


$ 


4. Senior Assistant Librarian 


$ 


3.79 hr. 


$ 


5. Junior Assistant Librarian 


$ 


3.23 hr. 


$ 


6. Clerk 


$ 


3.42 hr. 


$ 


7. Aides 


$ 


2.30 hr. 


$ 



E. HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT* 

1. Highway Superintendent $20,512.00 p.a. $** 

2. Highway Foreman $ 6.61 hr. $** 

3. Administrative Assistant $ 9,687.00 p.a. $** 

* The remaining classifications in this department are subject to 
collective bargaining. 



F. TOWN FIRE DEPARTMENT 

1. Fire Chief $26,354.00 p.a. 

2. Deputy Chief $21,341.00 p.a. 



G. TOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT 



1. Police Chief 

2. Captain 

H. RECREATION 

1. Clerk 

2. Director 

3. Swimming Director 

4. Swimming Instructor 

5. Playground Director 

6. Playground Supervisor 

7. Playground Instructor 

8. Sports Instructor 

I. YOUTH CENTER 

1. Coordinator 

2. Chief Supervisor 

3. Supervisor IV 

4. Supervisor III 
Supervisor II 

6. Supervisor I 

7. Clerk 

J. MISCELLANEOUS 

1. Animal Inspector 

2. Building Inspector 

3. Gas Inspector 

4. Electric Inspector 



$26,354.00 p.a. 
$21,341.00 p.a. 



$ 3.42 hr. 
$ 1,240.00 p.a. 



Min. 
$70.00 wk. 
$70.00 wk. 
$70.00 wk. 
$70.00 wk 
$70.00 wk. 
$70.00 wk. 



Max. 
$100.00 wk. 
$100.00 wk. 
$100.00 wk 
$100.00 wk. 
$100.00 wk. 
$100.00 wk. 



$ll,057.00p.a. 

$ 3.99 hr. 

$ 3.87 hr. 

$ 3.58 hr. 

$ 3.33 hr. 

$ 3.08 hr. 

$ 3.42 hr. 



$** 
$** 



$ 1,000.00 p 
$17,093.00 p 
$ 3,750.00 p 
$14,000.00 p 

5. Sealer of Weights & Measures$ 2,000.00 p 

6. Dog Officer $ 7,408.00 p 

7. Assistant Dog Officer $ 5,926.00 p 

8. Clock Winder $ 100.00 p 

**The rates set forth for the above departments are the current 1976- 
1977 rates and as negotiations are continuing these rates will be 
amended at the Town Meeting; or act in relation thereto. 

Personnel Board 



18 



A RTICLE 3, To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate such sums of money as may be required to 
defray town charges for the fiscal period from July 1, 
1977, to June 30 1978; or act in relation thereto. 

Treasurer 



ARTICLE 4, To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, 
to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the 
revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1977; in 
accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 
44, Section 4, and to issue a note or notes therefor, 
payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes 
as may be given for a period of less than one year in 
accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Treasurer 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to request the 
Department of Corporations and Taxation, Division of 
Accounts of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to 
make an audit of all accounts in all departments in the 
Town of Chelmsford; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 



appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$420,569.00 or some other sum of money to pay the 
Treasurer of Middlesex County Retirement System, the 
said amount being the town's share of the pension, 
expense and military service funds; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to be used as a Reserve Fund at the 
discretion of the Finance Committee, as provided in 
General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 6; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Finance Committee 



ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the 
following: Be it resolved that the Town of Chelmsford 
asks its representatives in the General Court that there be 
no extension of Compulsory and Binding Arbitration 
beyond its termination date of June 30, 1977; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 9 . To see if the Town will vote to adopt the 
following: Be it resolved that the Town of Chelmsford 
asks its representatives in the General Court to support an 
increase in the amount of local aid funding for fiscal 1978 
at least sufficient to cover the increased costs of the state 



mandated programs caused by inflation; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the 
following: Be it resolved that the Town of Chelmsford 
asks its representatives in the General Court to work 
against passage of all legislation imposing additional costs 
on local governments unless full funding is also voted; or 
act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will authorize the 
transfer of reimbursement funds in the sum of 
$645,000.00 received from the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts Flood Relief Board to pay a bond issue 
note or notes borrowed for the purpose of the 
reconstruction of Crystal Lake; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to rescind the 
balance of $305,000.00 from "Loans Authorized" as 
approved under Article 22 at the Annual Town Meeting 
held March 12, 1973. Said authorized borrowing of 
$950,000.00 for the reconstruction of Crystal Lake and 
only the sum $645,000.00 of required borrowing was 
necessary to complete this reconstruction project; or act 
in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will direct the School 
Building Committee, from present bonding authority, to 
erect bleachers and appurtenant structures at the site of 
the new Chelmsford High School football field from 
specifications furnished by the Chelmsford School 
Administration, in an amount not to exceed 
$100,000.00, or take any action in relation thereto. 

Petition 



ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, or transfer from available funds, the sum of 
$100,000.00 and direct the School Building Committee 
to erect bleachers and appurtenant structures at the site 
of the new Chelmsford High School football field from 
specifications furnished by the Chelmsford High School 
Administration, or take any action in relation thereto. 

Petition 



ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will authorize the 
transfer of $266,133.33 from free cash for principal and 
interest payment on New High School Bond Issue due 
June 1, 1977; or act in relation thereto. 

Finance Committee 



19 



ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to rescind 
the balance of $540,000.00 from "Loans Authorized" as 
approved under Article 8 at the adjourned Special Town 
Meeting held November 15, 1971. Said Article 
authorized the borrowing of $10,240,000.00 for the 
construction of the new High School and only the sum of 
$9,700,000.00 of required borrowing was necessary to 
complete this construction project; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 
School Building Committee 



ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to rescind 
the amount of $1,280,000.00 from "Loans Authorized" 
as approved under Article 1 at the Special Town Meeting 
held September 16, 1968. Said Article authorized the 
borrowing of $1,280,000.00 for the construction of a 
sewerage system in accordance with plans contained in a 
report dated June 15, 1964, by Camp, Dresser and 
McKee, Engineers. As the proposed sewerage system for 
the Town is presently progressing under engineering 
plans other than mentioned, the borrowing as authorized 
under the Article in question in ineffective; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to rescind 
the transfers of $2,841.60 from the Road Machinery 
Fund and $10,000.00 from the Stabilization Fund as 
approved under Article 13 at the adjourned Annual 
Town Meeting held May 10, 1976. Said Article 
authorized the purchase of several pieces of Highway 
Department equipment which included one Fron End 
Loader which purchase was determined to be 
unnecessary; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$6,672.00 to purchase warning and regulatory signs, the 
cost of which will be 100% reimbursement by the State; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purchase and/or construction of a 
Salt Storage Shed for the Highway Department, said shed 
to be located on Town owned property; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 



accordance with pins and specifications prepared by the 
Middlesex County Engineer at the following locations: 
Concord Road 
Graniteville Road 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to be used by the Department of Public 
Works Study Committee to engage professional services 
to study the most effective means of providing certain 
town services; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money not to exceed $2,000.00 for participating 
in a demonstration public works management program; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 
DPW Study Committee 



ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purpose of purchasing six (6) new 
1977 four door sedans to be used by the Police 
Department, said purchase to be made under the 
supervision of the Board of Selectmen; and to authorize 
the Selectmen to transfer by a good and sufficient bill of 
sale, title to one (1) 1971, one (1) 1974, one (1) 1975 and 
three (3) 1976 cruisers now being used by the Police 
Department; or take any act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to match LEAA Federal Funds, for the 
purpose of providing mutual aid programs for Police 
Department; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$15,000.00 to engage an outside professional consultant 
for an evaluation of the efficiency and performance of the 
Chelmsford Police Department; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 



appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the construction of sidewalks in 



appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$1,800.00 to be used to join or buy into the Merrimack 
Valley Home Care Center, Inc. for the purpose of 



20 



obtaining services for the care of the Town's older 
Americans; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 



agreement between the Towns of Chelmsford, Groton, 
Littleton and Westford creating the Nashoba Valley 
Technical High School District in accordance with 
Section VII, Amendments, of said agreement, so as to 
amend sub-section (D) Apportionment of Capital Costs, 
of Section IV, Budget, by adding after the first 
paragraph of said sub-section (D) the following 
paragraph: 

"Effective July 1, 1977, and thereafter, capital costs on 
new capital expenses, as set forth in sub-section (B) of 
Section IV, shall be apportioned annually in January for 
the ensuing fiscal year to the member towns on the basis 
of their respective pupil enrollments in the regional 
district schools. Each member town's share of such 
capital cost for each fiscal year shall be determined by 
computing the ratio which the Town pupil enrollment in 
the regional school district on October 1st of the year next 
preceding the year for which the apportionment is 
determined bears to the total pupil enrollment from all 
the member towns in the regional school district school 
on the same date. In computing this apportionment, the 
"persons" referred to in sub-section IV (F) shall be 
excluded. In the event that enrollment in the reginal 
district school has not been accomplished by October 1st 
of any year, capital cost shall be apportioned to the 
member towns on the basis of the average enrollment in 
Grades 9 through 12 in the previous three years of pupils 
residing in each member town and receiving education at 
town's expense on October 1st of those years. Capital 
costs incurred prior to July 1, 1977, however, shall 
continue to be apportioned in accordance with the 
provisions of the first paragraph of sub-section (D) of 
Section IV," or take any other action relative thereto. 

Nashoba Valley Technical 
High School District Committee 



ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to 
appropriate a sum of money in accordance with the 
Agreement between the Towns of Chelmsford, Groton, 
Littleton and Westford creating the Nashoba Valley 
Technical High School District, to be expended by said 
District Committee, for the purpose of construction and 
addition to and for alterations to and remodeling of said 
school and for furnishing said addition and alterations, 
and for plans, engineering and architectural fees and 
other costs incidental to said construction, alterations, 
remodeling and furnishing, and to determine how said 
shall be raised, whether by taxation, transfer, borrowing, 
or otherwise, and if borrowing to authorize the issuance 



of bonds or notes, or take other action relative thereto. 

Nashoba Valley Technical 
High School District Committee 



ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to direct the 
Board of Selectmen to request that the Chelmsford 
Recreation Commission assume control of Town property 
known as the Sheehan property at the intersection of Pine 
Hill Road and Singlefoot Road and to develop the 
property as a Community recreation site, or act in 
relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 



appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to implement the Master Plan of 
Recreation, or a portion of the Master Plan of Recreation 
developed at the direction of the 1975 Annual Town 
Meeting under Article 44 and to embrace the Robert's 
property at the intersection of Old Westford Road and 
Westford Street; the Sheehan property at the ntersection 
of Pine Hill Road and Singlefoot Road and the property 
bordering the Merrimack River in North Chelmsford 
known as the Chelmsford Sewer Commission 
development site. Development to follow the completed 
Master Plan as presented by Frank C. Gelinas and 
Associates, and presented to the Town at a public 
hearing with notification to abutters, Town of 
Chelmsford, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and the 
United States Government; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
General By-Laws, Article VIII Waste Disposal by 
deleting: 

Section 3 Trash Disposal (Recycling) 

In order to implement a program of recycling in 
conjunction with regular waste collections, residents of 
every household are requested to separate glass, cans and 
newspapers from the regular waste material before 
depositing same for collection. 

and adding: 

Section 3 Trash Disposal (Recycling) 



In order to implement a program of recycling in 
conjunction with regular waste collections, residents of 
every household are required to separate waste material 
in the following categories before depositing same for 
collection: 

1 . Glass and cans 

2. Paper 

3. Other waste 

If no separation takes place, the Highway Department 



21 



will not pick up the material and the household will be 
granted a twelve hour period to remove the material or 
suffer a fine of $15.00; or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 



_ To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to enter negotiations for the 
construction and placement of collection bins at the land 
fill for temporary storage of recycable materials; or act in 
realtion thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the 
following By-Law: 

No person shall remove any materials from the curbsides 
in the Town unless prior authorization is received from 
the Board of Selectmen. Violation of said By-Law shall 
be punishable by a fine of $100.00; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or tranfer from available funds the sum of 
$120,000.00 to implement the Camp, Dresser and McKee 
report dated November 8, 1976, as approved by the 
Commonwealth for a Sanitary Landfill Develoopment, or 
act in relation thereto 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or tranfer from available funds the sum of 
$500.00 to obtain appraisals of land adjacent to the 
Swain Road Landfill; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or tranfer from available funds a certain sum 
of money for the purchase of equipment for the Highway 
Department, such purchase to be made under the 
supervision of the Board of Selectmen, and to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to dispose of equipment presently 
being used by the Highway Department as follows: 

(a) To purchase two (2) Dump Trucks for the Highway 
Department and sell by good and sufficient bill of 
sale two (2) Dump Trucks presently being used by the 
Highway Department. 

(b) To purchase two (2) truck chassis (for waste 
collections) for the Highway Department and to sell 
by good and sufficient bill of sale one (1) waste 
collection truck presently being used by the Highway 
Department. (One) 1971 truck to be traded). 

(c) Two purchase two (2) packer bodies (for waste 
collections) for the Highway Department. 



(d) To purchase two (2) snow plows for the Highway 
Department. 

(e) To purchase two (2) sander bodies for the Highway 
Department (Hydraulic Type). 

(f) To purchase one (1) sidewalk snowplow tractor for 
the Highway Department. 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available fund a certain sum 
of money for the purpose of engaging a consultant to 
delineate limits of "wetlands" on the Town's two foot 
contour maps, or act in relation thereto. 

Conservation Commission 
ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 



appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to acquire approximately 6.5 acres of 
vacant land presently owned by Mr. Michael Logvin at 69 
Turnpike Road, Chelmsford, Massachusetts, said land to 
be used for conservation purposes. By vote of this Article, 
the Town authorizes the Conservation Commission to 
enter into a contractual self-help agreement with the 
Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs, 
or act in relation thereto. 

Conservation Commission 



ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available conservation funds 
a certain sum of money to acquire approximately 14 acres 
of vacant land presently owned by Mrs. Stanton at 351 
Boston Road in Chelmsford, Massachsuetts, said land to 
be used for conservation purposes. By vote of this Article, 
the Town authorizes the Conservation Commission to 
enter into a contractual self-help agreement with the 
Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs, 
or act in relation thereto. 

Conservation Commission 



ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to rise and 
appropriate or transfer from available conservation funds 
a certain sum of money to acquire approximately 30 acres 
of vacant land presently owned by Mr. Oscar Freeman off 
Mill Road in Chelmsford, Massachusetts, said land to be 
used for conservation purposes. By vote of this Article, 
the town authorizes the Conservation Commission to 
enter into a contractual self-help agreement with the 
Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Conservation Commission 



ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to publish an update of the Town's 
History; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



22 



ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
General By-Laws Article II, Section 1, B, as follows: 

The Annual Town Meeting shall meet on the second 
Monday in April to consider and adopt an annual 
operating and capital budget, and on other financial 
matters and such other business as may properly come 
before the meeting; or act in relation thereto. 

Ho me Rule Advisory Committee 

ARTICLE 44. Subject to approval of the preceding 
Article, will the Town amend the General By-Laws 
Article 2, section 2 as follows: 

Articles to be placed on the warrant of the Annual Town 
Meeting must be submitted 60 dys prior to the date of 
said Annual Town Meeting; or act in relation thereto. 

Home Rule Advisory Committee 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to establish a 
fall Town Meeting on the first Monday in October for 
the purpose of conducting business such as Zoning By- 
Laws, General By-Laws and other budgets; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Home Rule Advisory Committee 

ARTICLE 46. Subject to approval of the preceding 
Article, will the Town approve the following Article: 

Articles to be placed on the warrant of the Fall Town 
Meeting must be sumbitted 60 days prior to the date of 
said Fall Town Meeting; or act in relation thereto. 

Home Rule Advisory Committee 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
General By-Laws Article 2 "Town Meeting" Section 3 
Town Meeting Rules of Order by deleting the following: 

Section 2 - Quorum Requirements 

2.1 A quorum of not less than 200 registered voters 
eligible to vote on March 1 preceding the Town Meeting 
must be present at any or all Town Meetings to legally 
transact and consummate the business of the Town. 

2.2 No Special Town Meeting shall be held without a 
quorum of 300 registered voters eligible to vote on March 
1 preceding the Special Town Meeting. 

and the following: 

Section 2- Quorum Requirements 

2.1 A quorum of not less than 200 registered voters 
eligible to vote must be present at any or all Annual 
Town Meetings to legally transact and consummate the 
business of the Town. 

2.2 No special Town Meeting shall be held without a 



quorum of 300 registered voters eligible to vote preceding 
the Special Town Meeting; or act in relation thereto. 

Town Moderator 



ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 



General By-Laws Article VI Police Regulations, Section 9 
- Littering, by adding the following section: 

Any person delivering or causing to be delivered any 
advertising or informational material either singularly or 
collectively packaged upon any premises in the Town 
shall make known his identity and the location of his 
usual place of business or residence to each owner or 
occupant receiving said materials. Any person who does 
not desire to receive said materials may notify the 
distributor at this address of his desire not to receive said 
materials. Whoever, after receiving notification of a 
person's desire not to receive said materials, delivers or 
causes to be delivered any advertising or informational 
materials either singularly or collectively packaged upon 
that person's premises shall be punished by a fine of 
$50.00; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
General By-Laws Article VII, Miscellaneous, by adding 
the following: 

No person shall engage in the roadside sale of flowers, 
blankets, painting, gifts, fish, food, rugs, and trees 
without first obtaining a license issued by the Board of 
Selectmen and said license shall be conspicuously 
displayed by the vendor; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Chelmsford Zoning By-Law now in force and effect by 
substituting or amending and substituting the proposed 
Zoning By-Law and Zoning Map which were prepared by 
the Chelmsford Planning Board and dated April 1977 as 
filed in the office of the Town Clerk on which a public 
hearing was held at 9:00 P.M. April 28, 1977 notice of 
which was advertised in the Chelmsford Newsweekly as 
required by law; or act in relation thereto. 

Planning Board 

ARTICLE 51. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Chelmsford Zoning By-Law now in force and effect by 
substituting or amending and substituting the proposed 
Zoning By-Law and Zoning Map which were prepared by 
the Chelmsford Planning Board and dated April 1977 as 
filed in the office of the Town Clerk on which a public 
hearing was held at 8:00 P.M. April 28, 1977, notice of 
which was advertised in the Chelmsford Newsweekly as 
required by law; or act in relation thereto. 

Planning Board 



23 



ARTICLE 52. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 



Chelmsford Zoning By-Laws as follows: To change from 
General Industry (IB) to Business (CD), and multiple 
dwellings the following described parcel of land: 15.50 
acres bounded on the South by Middlesex Street but not 
abutting said street on the North by the Boston & Maine 
Railroad, on the West by a private right of way (Kennedy 
Drive) and on the East by land of Boston & Maine 
Railroad; or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 



ARTICLE 53. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Zoning By-Laws for the Town of Chelmsford, Section II, 
entitled Definitions, by adding the following: 
LUNCHEONETTE - structure for indoor sale and 
consumption of meals, not to exceed seating capacity for 
thirty people, using only disposable utensils, with no food 
to be consumed on the premises outside of a building 
except at tables out of sight of any public way; or act 
in relation thereto. 

Petition 



ARTICLE 54. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Zoning By-Laws for the Town of Chelmsford, Section V, 
entitled Use & Intensity Regulations under the subtitle 
Business Uses, by adding a new use as follows: 
LUNCHEONETTE - a permitted use in Zones CA.CB, 
CC, and CD, and a prohibited use in Zones RA, RB, RM, 
RC, IA, IB, and IC; or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 



ARTICLE 55. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 



Zoning By-Laws, Section IX by adding Signs: 
Section 9. i. 4 Trailer Mounted Signs 

No trailer mounted signs shall be allowed parked or 
otherwise placed within the Town for the express 
purpose of political or commercial advertising; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Petition 



ARTICLE 56. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
Planning Board Subdivision Rules and Regulations, 
Article III Paragraph 3.25 by adding the following; 

(C) Contractors are required to submit to the Planning 
Board "As Built" drawings as a prerequisite for approval 
of bond release; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 57. To see if the Town will vote to accept the 
following mentioned streets as laid out by the Board of 
Selectmen and shown by their reports and plans duly filed 
in the Office of the Town Clerk, and to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 



sum of money for the purpose of reconstructing the 
following mentioned streets: 

Ideal Avenue Extension 

Lisa Lane 

Piccadilly Circle 

Baldwin Pond 

Brush Hill Road 

Providing all construction of same meets with the 
requirements of the Board of Selectmen, and subject to 
the withholding of any remaining bonds until such 
requirements have been met; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 58. To see if the Town will vote to disband 



the Library Needs Committee as voted at the Annual 
Town Meeting held onMarch 18, 1968 Article 31; or act 
in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 59. To see if the Town will vote to accept the 
provisions of Chapter 45, Section 21 of Mass. General 
Laws to delegate the care and management of the Town 
Forest to the Town Conservation Commission; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 
Conservation Commission 



ARTICLE 60. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the transfer of a certain sum of money from the Insruance 
Sinking Fund to pay the current year Fire Insurance 
Premium; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 61 . To see if the Town will vote to approve 



the filing of a petition in the General Court for an act 
enabling the Town to abolish the Skinking Fund which 
was established by Article 16, Annual Town Meeting 
1907, under Chapter 191 of the Acts of 1905; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 62. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 



the Board of Selectmen to convey to Ralph H. House and 
Catherine K. House all right, title and interest, if any, 
held by the Town in the following parcel of land, for 
consideration to be determined: 

Lot 31, Block 22 Assessor's Map 66, consisting of 3,300 
square feet of land, more or less, and the buildings 
thereon, if any, located on Sixth Avenue, which was takne 
for non-payment of taxes from Alice Cunha by 
instrument recorded at the Middlesex North District 
Registry of Deeds in Book 1620, Page 83. 



24 



For title reference, see Treasurer's deed to the Town of 
Chelmsford, dated June 18, 1975, and recorded in said 
Registry at Book 2153, Page 301; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 63. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to convey to Roger Clermont all 
right, title and interest if any, held by the Town in the 
following parcel of land, for consideration to be 
determined: 

Lot 43, Block 22 Assessor's Map 66 consisting of 3,300 
square feet of land, more or less, located on Fifth 
Avenue; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 64. To see if the Town will vote to instruct the 
Board of Assessors to issue a certain sum of money from 
free cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the tax rate 
for the current fiscal period; or act in relation thereto. 

Finance Committee 



Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with 
your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 

Given under our hands this 18th day of March, A.D., 
1977. 

Paul C. Hart, Chairman 
Philip L. Currier 
Thomas A. Palmer, Jr. 
William R. Murphy 
Arnold J. Lovering 

Chelmsford Board of Selectmen 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MARCH 18, 1977 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 

Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: McFarlin School - All Purpose Room; North 
Elementary School Auditorium; Colonel Moses Parker 
Junior High School Band Room; East Chelmsford School; 
Byam School Cafetorium; Westlands School Cafeteria; 
North Elementary School Auditorium; Small 
Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy Junior High School; 
South Row School Auditorium; South Row School 
Auditorium; Westlands School Cafeteria; Fire House- Old 
Westford Road, seven days at least before the time 
appointed for holding the meeting aforesaid. 



William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



A true copy, Attest: 



WARRANT FOR 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

May 12, 1977 
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Townof Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford to meet in the McCarthy Junior High 
School Gymnasium on Thursday, the twelfth day of May, 
1977 at 8:00 P.M. o'clock in the evening, then and there 
to act upon the following articles, viz: 

ARTICLE 1 . To see if the Town will vote to accept 
Fletcher Street as laid out, relocated or altered by the 
Board of Selectmen and shown by their reports and plans 
duly fded in the Office of the Town Clerk and as set forth 
on a plan of land entitled "relocation Plan of Fletcher 
Street in Chelmsford, Massachusetts as ordered by the 
Chelmsford Board of Selectmen" dated April 1977 by 
Emmons, Fleming and Bienvenu, Engineers and 
Surveyors, North Billerica, Massachusetts and to raise 
and appropriate or transfer from available funds a 
certain sum of money for the purpose of reconstructing 
said Fletcher Street as laid out, relocated or altered and 
to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire the land 
necessary to institute said acceptance pursuant to 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 82, Section 24. 
Providing all construction meets with the requirements of 
the Board of Selectmen, and subject to the withholding of 
any remaining bonds until such requirements have been 
met; or act in relation thereto. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$5,280.00 or some other sum for the purpose of paying 
salaries for the supervision of the beach area at Crystal 
Lake; or act in relation thereto. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to amend the 
General By-Laws, Article VI, Police Regulations, by 
adding the following: 

Regulation of Motor Boats on Crystal Lake 

It shall be unlawful for any person to operate a marine 
or recreational vehicle powered by an engine in excess of 
three (3) horsepower on any portion of Crystal Lake at 
anytime; or act in relation thereto. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



25 



iRTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
ppropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
92,000.00 or some other sum of money for the 
ngineering and construction of sidewalks at the 
ollowing locations: 

Summer Street 

Grove Street 

Westford Street 

Stedman Street 

Dalton Street 

Chelmsford Street 

Boston Road 

Mill Road 



ir act in relation thereto. 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to rasie and 
lppropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
um of money with which to meet bills for previous years; 
»r act in relation thereto. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

■iRTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the 
mm of $6,500.00 from the Fire Department's Officers 
nd Administration Account to the Fire Department's 
Vlaintenance and Equipment Account; or act in relation 
'hereto. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to amend its 
(ction taken under Article 78 of the Annual Town 
Meeting May 14, 1973, as follows: 

To grant longevity benefits to all permanent employees 
who are members of the respective collective 
bargaining units of the Police Department and Fire 
Department in accordance with the following 
schedule: 

. Upon completion of five years of employment, said 
employee shall receive a three per cent (3%) increase. 

. Upon completion of ten years employment, said 
employee shall receive a six per cent (6%) increase. 

. Upon completion of fifteen years of employment, said 
employee shall receive a nine per cent (9%) increase. 

Upon completion of twenty years of employment, said 
employee shall receive a twelve per cent (12%) increase. 

rr act in relation thereto. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

IRTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to amend its 



To grant longevity benefits to all permanent employees 
who are members of the respective collective 
bargaining units of the Police Department and Fire 
Department in accordance with the following 
schedule: 

a. Upon completion of five years of employment, said 
employee shall receive a three per cent (3%) increase. 

b. Upon completion of ten years employment, said 
employee shall receive a six per cent (6%) increase. 

c. Upon completion of fifteen years of employment, said 
employee shall receive a nine (9%) increase. 

d. Upon completion of twenty years of employment, said 
employee shall receive a twelve per cent (12%) 
increase. 

This amendment shall not apply to persons employed 
by the Town on the effective date of this amendment in a 
position that would entitle that person to longevity 
benefits under Article 78 of the Annual Town Meeting of 
May 14, 1973; or act in relation thereto. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with 
your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 

Given under our hands this 28th day of April. A.D., 
1977. 

Philip L. Currier, Chairman 

William R. Murphy 

Joseph B. Shanahan, Jr. 

Arnold J. Lovering 

Paul C. Hart 

Chelmsford Board of Selectmen 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 



APRIL 28, 1977 



Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: McFarlin School - All Purpose Room; v North 
Elementary School Auditorium; Colonel Moses Parker 
Junior High School Band Room; East Chelmsford School; 
Byam School Cafetorium; Westlands School Cafeteria; 
North Elementary School Auditorium; Small 
Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy Junior High School; 
South Row School Auditorium; South Row School 
Auditorium; Westlands School Cafeteria; Fire House-Old 
Westford Road, fourteen days at least before the time 
appointed for holding the meeting aforesaid. 



A true copy, Attest: 



ction taken under Article 78 of the Annual Town 
Meeting May 14, 1973, as follows: 



William E. Spence 
Contable of Chelmsford 



26 

ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
April 2, 1977 

Prec. 1 Prec. 2 Prec. 3 Prec. 4 Prec. 5 Prec. 6 Prec. 7 Prec. 8 Prec. 9 Prec. 10 Prec. 11 Prec. 12 TOTAL 



SELECTMEN for 3 Years 



Robert D. Hall 


184 


133 


202 


78 


235 


174 


113 


134 


132 


247 


165 


191 


1,988 


Paul C. Hart (Re-election) 


291 


224 


348 


131 


297 


325 


213 


224 


191 


375 


293 


299 


3,211 


Joseph B. Shanahanjr. 


352 


199 


344 


118 


317 


286 


188 


218 


200 


361 


284 


310 


3.177 


All Others 





1 


1 





1 




















30 


33 


Blanks 


201 


111 


173 


69 


168 


167 


72 


124 


129 


187 


150 


162 


1,713 


TOTAL 


1,028 


668 


1,068 


396 


1,018 


952 


586 


700 


652 


1.170 


892 


992 


10,122 


ASSESSOR for 3 Years 




























Stephen D. Wojcik 


234 


163 


246 


76 


253 


170 


153 


151 


129 


279 


138 


198 


2,190 


Ruth K. Delaney 


257 


155 


248 


104 


229 


285 


127 


183 


171 


272 


300 


270 


2.601 


All Others 









































Blanks 


23 


16 


40 


18 


27 


21 


13 


16 


26 


34 


8 


28 


270 



TOTAL 514 3! 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONER for 3 Years 

Gerald L. Hardy (Re-election) 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



399 


255 


403 


157 


397 


372 


244 


274 


236 


435 


370 


347 


3,889 


2 











1 








1 





1 





1 


6 


113 


79 


131 


41 


111 


104 


49 


75 


90 


149 


76 


148 


1,166 


514 


334 


534 


198 


509 


476 


293 


350 


326 


585 


446 


496 


5,061 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONER for 2 years, to fill vacancy 

Everett V. Olsen 
All Others 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

HOUSING AUTHORITY for 5 years 

John M. Manningjr. 
Robert A. Sheridan 
All Others 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

MEMBER OF BOARD OF HEALTH for 3 Years 



410 


274 


419 


162 


398 


375 


257 


272 


239 


437 


356 


356 


3.955 


2 




















1 














3 


102 


60 


115 


36 


111 


101 


36 


77 


87 


148 


90 


140 


1.103 


514 


334 


534 


198 


509 


476 


293 


350 


326 


585 


446 


496 


5.061 


rars 
231 


117 


221 


72 


217 


179 


100 


179 


124 


225 


185 


186 


2,036 


202 


172 


216 


93 


212 


233 


151 


128 


153 


262 


208 


204 


2.234 









































81 


45 


97 


33 


80 


64 


42 


43 


49 


98 


53 


106 


791 


514 


334 


534 


198 


509 


476 


293 


350 


326 


585 


446 


496 


5,061 



Paul J. Canniff (Re-election) 


291 


90 


252 


90 


264 


268 


116 


187 


180 


308 


250 


260 


2,556 


Irene Korsak McGreevy 


194 


228 


257 


83 


215 


177 


172 


137 


118 


235 


165 


202 


2,183 


All Others 









































Blanks 


_29 


!<L 


25 


25 


30 


31 


5 


26 


28 


42 


31 


34 


322 


TOTAL 


514 


334 


534 


198 


509 


476 


293 


326 


585 


446 


496 


5.061 





MEMBER of Nashoba Valley Technical 
High School District Committee for 3 Years 

Randolph W. Brumagim 278 158 

Jay M. Knox (Re-election) 347 207 

All Others 1 1 

Blanks 402 302 

TOTAL 1,028 668 
PARK COMMISSIONER for 3 Years 

J. Joan Schenk (Re-election) 397 252 

All Others 14 

Blanks 117 68 

TOTAL 514 3343 
PLANNING BOARD MEMBER for 4 Years 



307 
330 



105 
128 



431 
1,068 



110 
534 



163 
396 



57 
198 



272 246 

313 340 



433 366 

1,018 952 



384 



125 



155 
222 

209 
586 



179 

223 



151 
212 



271 
379 



246 
317 



298 
700 



289 
652 



238 




104 
476 



426 



159 



329 
892 



358 




Eugene E. Gilet (Reelection) 387 260 395 

All Others 3 

Blanks 124 74 139 

TOTAL 514 334 534 



365 



144 



245 


48 



97 
326 



407 



178 



359 

87 



265 

297 



430 



359 



137 

496 



348 



148 



2.633 
3,315 



4.170 
10,122 



1,181 
5,061 



3,769 

3 

1,289 

5.061 



27 



Prec. 1 Prec. 2 Prec. 3 Prec. 4 Prec. 5 Prec. 6 Prec. 7 Prec. 8 Prec. 9 Prec. 10 Prec. 11 Prec. 12 TOTAL 



PLANNING BOARD MEMBER for 3 Years 



Paul F. Bartel 


373 


240 


380 


144 


364 


353 


233 


261 


218 


400 


346 


327 


3,639 


All Others 


4 




















1 














5 


Blanks 


137 


94 


154 


54 


145 


123 


60 


88 


108 


185 


100 


169 


1,417 


TOTAL 


514 


334 


534 


198 


509 


476 


293 


350 


326 


585 


446 


496 


5,061 


MEMBER OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE for 3 Years 






















Stanley W. Norkunas 


231 


233 


308 


74 


230 


239 


181 


165 


151 


247 


214 


247 


2,520 


Margaret A. Fudge 


194 


74 


177 


97 


190 


198 


93 


137 


124 


301 


205 


170 


1,960 


J. Michael Folk 


118 


122 


127 


46 


106 


100 


129 


64 


59 


108 


89 


83 


1,151 


William K. Sharpleyjr. 


281 


108 


298 


81 


338 


254 


103 


208 


199 


320 


240 


307 


2.737 


All Others 


2 


3 


1 





1 


3 








2 


2 


1 





15 


Blanks 


202 


128 


157 


98 


153 


158 


80 


126 


117 


192 


143 


185 


1,739 


TOTAL 


1,028 


668 


1,068 


398 


1,018 


952 


586 


700 


652 


1,170 


892 


992 


10,122 


SINKING FUND COMMISSIONER for 1 Year to 


fill vacancy 




















Philip H. Green 


379 


236 


373 


147 


371 


358 


233 


251 


220 


408 


349 


327 


3.652 


All Others 


4 





2 








2 


5 





1 


1 








15 


Blanks 


131 


98 


159 


51 


138 


116 


55 


99 


105 


176 


97 


169 


1,394 


TOTAL 


514 


334 


534 


198 


509 


476 


293 


350 


326 


585 


446 


496 


5,061 


SINKING FUND COMMISSIONER for 3 Years 
























Ralph H. House 





6 


1 


4 


1 


1 


8 


2 








6 





29 


All Others (Misc.) 


12 


6 


23 





5 


7 


1 


4 


10 


10 


13 


11 


102 


Blanks 


502 


322 


510 


194 


503 


468 


284 


344 


316 


575 


427 


485 


4,930 


TOTAL 


514 


334 


534 


198 


509 


476 


293 


350 


326 


585 


446 


496 


5,061 


SEWER COMMISSIONER for 


3 Years 


























Charles L. Weaver 


379 


232 


383 


139 


374 


357 


231 


246 


218 


393 


336 


318 


3,606 


All Others 



































1 


1 


Blanks 


135 


102 


151 


59 


135 


119 


62 


104 


108 


192 


110 


177 


1,454 


TOTAL 


514 


334 


534 


198 


509 


476 


293 


350 


326 


585 


446 


496 


5,061 


PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUSTEE for 3 Years 
























Mary Claire Phelan 


348 


197 


375 


124 


355 


346 


207 


239 


216 


372 


308 


335 


3,422 


Dennis E. McHugh 


363 


217 


338 


133 


334 


326 


217 


228 


205 


372 


314 


290 


3,337 


All Others 


1 



































1 


Blanks 


316 


254 


355 


139 


329 


280 


162 


233 


231 


426 


270 


367 


3,362 


TOTAL 


1,028 


668 


1.068 


396 


1.018 


952 


586 


700 


652 


1,170 


892 


992 


10,122 


CONSTABLE for 3 Years 




























William E. Spence 


394 


253 


380 


165 


388 


371 


241 


256 


226 


418 


356 


346 


3,794 


All Others 


2 


1 


1 


























15 


19 


Blanks 


118 


80 


153 


33 


121 


105 


52 


94 


100 


167 


90 


135 


1,248 






























TOTAL 


514 


334 


534 


198 


509 


476 


293 


350 


326 


585 


446 


496 


5,061 


QUESTION #1 




























YES 


204 


107 


208 


62 


228 


174 


72 


160 


137 


224 


148 


259 


1,983 


NO 


253 


197 


286 


120 


248 


260 


188 


161 


158 


306 


260 


184 


2,621 


Blanks 


57 


30 


40 


16 


33 


42 


33 


29 


31 


55 


38 


53 


457 


TOTAL 


514 


334 


534 


198 


509 


476 


293 


350 


326 


585 


446 


496 


5.061 



28 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
April 25, 1977 

The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at 7:50 
p.m. by the Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin Jr. who 
recognized the presence of a quorum. There wre 531 
voters present. Chairman of the Board of Selectmen 
Philip L. Currier moved that the reading of the 
Constable's return of service and the posting of the 
warrant be waived. It was so voted, unanimously. Mr. 
Currier moved that the reading of the entire warrant be 
waived. It was so voted, unanimously. 

The Moderator asked for a moment of silence in 
recognition of three Town Employees who had passed 
away within the past year; 

Arne Olsen, Cemetery Commissioner 

Roger Boyd, Former Selectmen 

Peter Curran, Finance Committee Member 

The Moderator also recognized the service of Richard 
T. McDermott who retired after devoting eighteen years 
of service to the Finance Committee. Mr. Coughlin also 
spoke of the work the Finance Committee does, the 
Committee itself works over 1000 hours in preparation for 
the Annual Town Meeting. 

Chairman Currier presented Mr. William Edge with 
the Outstanding Municipal Employee Award for 1976- 
1977. Mr. Edge received a standing ovation from the 
Town Meeting Body. 

Chairman Currier also introduced Miss Massachusetts 
for the year 1977, who is also the reigning Miss 
Chelmsford, Carolyn A. Marcil, and wished her luck in 
the up coming Miss USA Pageant. 

The Moderator then explainted the ground rules of 
Town Meeting Procedures. Chairman Philip L. Currier 
moved that the reports of the Town Officers and 
Committees be heard, under Article 1 . 

Mr. William Murphy made a motion to nominate 
Bernard Battles Jr. of 31 Sherman Street to the Varney 
Playground Commission for a three year term. Mr. 
Robert Charpentier placed the name of William A. 
Dempster of 89 Crooked Spring Road. A motion was 
made to close nominations. Motion carried. The 
moderator tried to determine the vote by a showing of 
hands, — a hand count was taken Tellers appt. were: 



Richard Burtt 
Carl Olsson 
Dorothy Lerer 

Results of the vote; 



Margaret Johnson 

Alfred Colburn 

John Carson 



Ina Greenblatt 



The moderator declared Mr. Dempster as the winner. 

A report was presented by Selectmen William R. 
Murphy with the aide of the slide projector showing the 
Capital Budget Committee Report a five year plan and 
explanation. 

UNDER ARITCLE 2. The Board of Selectmen moved 
to delete Line #12, Superintendent of Engineering 
Operations from the "Job Titles and Standard Rates for 
Wages and Salaries of the Personnel Wage and Salary By- 
Law". Motion carried. Chairman of the Personnel 
Board, David J. McLachlan moved that the Town vote to 
further amend Section 24, subtitled "Job Titles and 
Standard Rates for Wages and Salaries of the Personnel 
Wage and Salary By-Law", by adding the following 
positions: Administrative and Clerical - Library - Line 8. 
Supervisor - Maintenance; Town Fire Department - Line 
3. Mechanic; Town Police Department - Line 3. 
Mechanic by deleting under Recreation - line 3. 
Swimming Director; Line 4. Swimming Instructor; and 
adding under Recreation the following positions; Line 3. 
Water Safety Instructor/Director; Line 4. Life 
Guard/Swimming Instructor. 

Motion passed. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2A. Chairman of the Personnel 
Board David McLachlan moved that the Town vote to 
further amend Section 24, Subtitled "Job Titles and 
Standard Rates for Wages and Salaries of the Personnel 
Wage and Salaries of the Personnel Wage and Salary By- 
Law.", to conform to rates of pay negotiated by the Town 
with certain labor organizations, pursuant to General 
Laws, Chapter 150E. 

Recommended 
Fiscal July 1. 1977 



Bernard Battles Jr. 150 

William A. Dempster 152 



ADMINISTRATIVE AND CLERICAL 






I . Veteran's Agent 


$11,024.00 p. a 


2. Clerk Senior 


8.807.00 p 


a 


3. Clerk 


7,020.00 p 


a 


4. Town Accountant 


16.592.00 p 


a 


5. Assistant Treasurer 


10.074.00 p 


a 


6. Town Counsel 


500.00 p 


a 


7. Selectmen's Administrative Assistant 


12,241.00p 


a 


8. Board of Registrar's Clerk 


850.00 p 


a 


9. Board of Registrar's three members 


360.00 ea 


10. Clerk, Part time 


3.56 hr 


1 1 . Town Aide 


8,960.00 pa 


Motion Carried 




CONSERVATION. PARKS AND CEMETERY 




1. Cemtery Superintendent 


J15,023.00p.a 


2. Superintendent of Insect & Pest Control 


1.250.00 p. a 


3. Landscaper - Park 


4.36 hr 


4. Laborer Park 


3.98 hr 


5. Unskilled Laborer 


2.30 hr 


6. Skilled Forest Workman 


3.27 hr 


7. Equipoment Operator - Park 


4.73 hr 


8. Park Superintendent 


15.023.00 p 


a. 



Motion Carried 



29 



CUSTODIAL 
1. Custodian 
Motion Carried 

LIBRARY 



7. Assistant Dog Officer 

8. Clock Winder 



6,163.00p.a. 
100.00 p. a. 



1 . Librarian MLS 

2. Librarian MLS (Assistant) 

3. Branch Librarian 

4. Senior Assistant Librarian 

5. Junior Assistant Librarian 

6. Clerk 

7. Aides 

8. Supervisor - Maintenance 

Motion Carried 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

1. Highway Superintendent 

2. Highway Forman 

3. Administrative Assistant 

Motion Carried 
TOWN FIRE DEPARTMENT 

1. Fire Chief 

2. Deputy Chief 

3. Mechanic (Fire & Police) 

Motion Carried 
TOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT 



1. Police Chief 

2. Captain 

Motion Carried 
RECREATION 

1. Clerk 

2. Director 

3. Swimming Director 

4. Swimming Instructor 

5. Playground Director 

6. Playground Supervisor 

7. Playground Instructor 

8. Sports Instructor 

Motion Carried 
YOUTH CENTER 



MIN. 

72.80 
72.80 wk. 
72.80 wk. 
72.80 wk. 
72.80 wk. 
72.80 wk. 



1. Coordinator 

2. Chief Supervisor 

3. Supervisor IV 

4. Supervisor III 

5. Supervisor II 

6. Supervisor I 

7. Clerk 

Motion Carried 
MISCELLANEOUS 

1. Animal Inspector 

2. Building Inspector 

3. Gas Inspector 

4. Electric Inspector 

5. Sealer of Weights & Measures 

6 . Dog Officer 



$16,640.00 p. a 
11,259.00 p.a 
9,487,00 p. a 
3.94 hr 
3.36 hr 
3.56 hr 
2.30 hr 
4.72 hr 



21.332.00 p.a. 

6.87 hr. 

10,074.00 p.a. 



22.195.00 p.a. 
15,000.00 p.a. 



$11.499.00p.a. 
4.15 hr. 
4.02 hr. 
3.72 hr. 
3.46 hr. 
3.20 hr. 
3.56 hr. 



1.000.00 p 
17.777.00p 

3,750.00 p 
14.560.00 p 

2.000.00 p 

7.704.00 p 



Motion Carried 

Selectman Currier moved to take Article 60 out of 
order. He explained the transfer of $60,000. would be 
used to reduce Line item 114. The Finance Committee 
agreed. A vote was taken on the motion. — Motion 
Carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 60. Selectman Philip L. Currier 
moves that the Town vote to authorize the transfer of 
$60,000.00 from the Insurance Sinking Fund to pay the 
current year Fire Insurance Premium. 

The Finance Committee recommends the Article and 
states that it will be applied to Line #114 under the 
Insurance Department Budget. It will reduce that Line 
Item from $231,000. to $171,000. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 3. Treasurer Philip J. McCormack 
moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate such 
sums of money as may be required to defray Town 
Charges for the Fiscal period from July 1, 1977, to June 
30, 1978. 







Finance Committee 






Recommendation 


22.195.00 p.a. 


ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT 
SALARIES 






1. Accountant 


$16,592.00 




2. Senior Clerk (3) 


26.420.00 


3.56 hr. 
1.290.00 p.a. 


3. Additional Clerk Hire 

4. Severance 

5. Vacation and Sickness 


0.00 

0.00 

1,000.00 


MAX. 

104.00 wk. 


Total 


$44,012.00 


104.00 wk. 


Motion Carried 




104.00 wk. 
104.00 wk. 
104.00 wk. 
104.00 wk. 


EXPENSES 

6. Expenses 

7. Outlay 


$ 1.500.00 
0.00 



Total 

TOTAL ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT 
Motion Carried 
ANIMAL INSPECTORS DEPARTMENT 

8. Inspector's Salary 

9. Expense 

TOTAL ANIMAL INSPECTOR'S DEPARTMENT 
Motion Carried 
BOARD OF APPEALS 



10. Clerk Hire 

1 1 . Expenses 

12. Outlay Account 



TOTAL BOARD OF APPEALS 

Motion Carried 



$ 1,500.00 
$45,512.00 



$ 1.000.00 
100.00 



$ 2,371.00 

1,900.00 

0.00 

$ 4.271.00 



SALARIES 




13. Assessor (Full Time) 


$16,592.00 


14. Board Member ( Part Time) 


7,966.00 


15. Senior Clerk (4) 


35,226.00 


16. Clerk (Part Time) 


0.00 


16A. Certified Mass. Assessor's Compensation 


1,500.00 


Total 


$61,284.00 


EXPENSES 




17. Office Expenses 


$ 4,500.00 


18. Transportation 


1,000.00 


19. Outlay's 


0.00 


20. Data Proc. (Tax Billing) 


5,600.00 


Total 


$11,000.00 


TOTAL ASSESSORS DEPARTMENT 


$72,384.00 



Motion Carried 
BICENTENNIAL CELEBRATION COMMITTEE 

21 . Expenses - Annual Operation 

22. Accumulation Fund (1975-1976) 



Includes: Zoning By-Law Enforcement 

23. Inspector's Salary 

24. Sr. Clerk 

25. Vacation & Sickness 

26. Transportation 

27 . Inspector's Expenses 

28. Out of Town Expenses 

29. Plumbing Insp. (Fees & Transfers) 



SALARIES 

30. Commissioners (3) 

31. Superintendent 

32. General Labor 

33. Special Labor for Lot Owners 

34. Vacation & Sick Leave 

35. Interments 
Total 

36. Transportation Superintendent 

37. Expenses 
Outlays 

38. Out of State 

39. Restore Forefather's and Hart Pond 
Total 

TOTAL CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 
Motion Carried 
CIVILIAN DEFENSE 

40. Expenses 

41. Outlays 

TOTAL CIVILIAN DEFENSE 
Motion Carried 



0.00 
0.00 



TOTAL BICENTENNIAL CELEBRATION COMM. $ 
Motion Carried 
BUILDING INSPECTOR'S DEPARTMENT 



$17,777.00 

1.00 

1.00 

1,511.00 

2,400.00 

250.00 

2,000.00 



TOTAL BUILDING INSPECTOR'S DEPARTMENT $23,940.00 
Motion Carried 
CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 



$ 300.00 

15,023.00 

41,488.00 

1,000.00 

0.00 

5,000.00 



$12,300.00 
$75,111.00 



$ 4,000.00 
2.200.00 



$ 6,200.00 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

42. Expenses 
Motion Carried 

CONSTABLE 

43. Constable's Salary 
Motion Carried 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

44. Expenses 

45. Transportation Expenses 

TOTAL COUNCIL ON AGING 
Motion Carried 
DEBT AND INTEREST 

46. High School Loan No. I 

47. High School Loan No. 2 

48. Highway Garage Loan 

49. South Row Elementary School Loan 

50. Junior High School Loan 

51. Westland Elem. School and 
Harrington Elem. School Loan 

52. Byam Elementary School Loan 

53. High School- 1972 #1 
53a. High School- 1972 #2 

Debt Total 

Interest 

54. High School Loan No. 1 

55. High School Loan No. 2 

56. Highway Garage Loan 

57. Anitcipation of Revenue and 
Reimbursement Loans 

58. South Row Elem. School Loan 

59. Junior High School 

60. Westland Elem. School and 
Harrington Elem. School Loan 

61 . Byam Elementary School Loan 

62. High School- 1972 #1 
62a. High School- 1972 #2 

Interest Total 

TOTAL DEBT AND INTEREST 

Motion Carried 



$ 8,400.00 
3,000.00 



$ 0.00 

85.000.00 

0.00 

45,000.00 

110,000.00 

160.000.00 
105,000.00 
850.000.00 
240,000.00 
$1,595,000.00 



$ 0.00 

2,720.00 

0.00 

75.000.00 

6.300.00 

24,213.00 

71,380.00 

77 250 00 

205.700.00 

47.040.00 

$509,603.00 

$2,104,603.00 



$ 7,704.00 
6.163.00 
1,500.00 

TOTAL DOG OFFICER $15,367.00 

Motion Carried 

EDWARDS MEMORIAL BEACH 

66. Expenses $ 1.00 

A Discussion followed. Recreation Commissioner 
William Dempster moved to table Line Item 66 to the 
following week. Mr. Robert McManimon of the Varney 
Playground Commission stated that the Varney 
Playground Commission did not put the $1.00 figure into 



$62,811.00 


DOG OFFICER 


$ 300.00 


SALARIES 


10,200.00 


63. Dog Officer 


0.00 


64. Assistant Dog Officer 


300.00 


65. Expenses 


1,500.00 





31 



the budget and wanted the Town Meeting Body to vote 
no on the motion. 

Motion to table Line Item 66, Motion defeated, a vote 
was taken on the Edwards Memorial Beach Total Budget 
with the $1 .00 figure, 

Motion Carried. 

Finance Committee 
Recommendation 

ELECTIONS 



85. Physicians 

86. Vacation and Sickness 



67. Wages and Expenses 
Motion Carried 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

68. Expenses 
Motion Carried 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

SALARIES 

69. Officers and Administration 

70. Regular and Substitute Account 

7 1 . Severance Pay 
Total 

EXPENSES 

72. Maintenance and Equipment 

73. Outlays 

74. Out of State 

75. Stabilization Fund (Equipment) 
Total 



$ 1,560.00 



$ 131.161.00 

1,009.195.00 

0.00 



$1 


142,356.00 


$ 


71,355.00 




2.970.00 




400.00 




0.00 



$74,725.00 
$1,217,081.00 

164,498.00 
$1,052,583.00 



TOTAL FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation from Federal Revenue Sharing 

COST OF TOWN 

Motion Carried 

Chairman Marvin Schenk from the Finance 
Committee explained that the increase of the Officers 
and Administration Line Item #69 was due to the 4% 
increase given only to the Clerk and Deputy Chief, as 
negotiations are still going on. After a lenghty discussion, 
a vote was taken on the Total Fire Department Budget, 
Motion Carried 

GAS PIPING & FIXTURE DEPARTMENT 



79. Inspectors Fees 

80. Inspectors Salary 

81. Expenses 

81a. Transportation 

81b. Out of Town Expense 

81C Vacation and Sickness 



0.00 

3,750.00 

600.00 

750.00 

100.00 

1.00 



TOTAL GAS PIPING & FIXTURE DEPARTMENT $ 5.201.00 
Motion Carried 
HEALTH & SANITATION DEPARTMENT 



EXPENSES 


87. Health and Professional Services 


88 


Mosquito Control Study 


89 


Transportation Directors 


90 


Other Expense 


91 


Out of State Expense 


92 


Outlay 


93 


Blood Program 



Total 

TOTAL OF SALARIES & EXPENSES 
Motion Carried 
HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 



1,000.00 

500.00 

$31,165.00 



$ 4,700.00 

400.00 

1,500.00 

1,850.00 

300.00 

0.00 

250.00 

$ 9,000.00 



Selectman Murphy 



to table the Highway Department Budget. 



MOTION CARRIED (Budget taken up after the School Building 
Committee's Budget) 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

106. Expenses 
Motion Carried 

HOME RULE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

107. Expenses 
Motion Carried 

HYDRANT SERVICE DEPARTMENT 

108. Center 

109. North 

110. East 

111. South 

TOTAL HYDRANT SERVICE DEPARTMENT 
Motion Carried 
INSECT PEST CONTROL 



$ 1,650.00 



112. Superintendent's Salary 

113. Expenses 

TOTAL INSECT PEST CONTROL 
Motion Carried 
INSURANCE DEPARTMENT 



$34,400.00 
13,000.00 
5,500.00 
4,000.00 

$56,900.00 



$ 1,250.00 
12,850.00 



$14,100.00 



Transfer $60,000. from the Insurance Sinking Fund Article 60 
reduces line Item 114 from $231,000. to $171,000. 



114. Prop Liab. & All Types of Ins. 

115. Chapter 32B Insurance - Employees 

116. Police Professional Liability 

TOTAL INSURANCE DEPARTMENT 
Motion Carried 



$171,000.00 
270,000.00 
0.00 

$441,000.00 



82. Board Members 

83. Director of Public Health 

84. Senior Clerk 



$ 828.00 

20.030.00 

8.807.00 



32 



LAW DEPARTMENT 

SALARIES 

117. Town Counsel 

118. Legal Services 

119. Misc. Exp. Association Dues 

TOTAL LAW DEPARTMENT 
Motion Carried Unanimously 

LIBRARY DEPARTMENT 

SALARIES 

120. Librarian 

121. Assistant Director 

122. Branch Librarian 

123. Assistant Librarians 

124. Library Aides 

125. Custodian & Security 

126. Vacation & Sickness 
Total 



EXPENSES 

127. Repair & Maintenance of Bldgs 

128. Fuel, Light and Water 

129. Books and Periodicals 

130. Other Expenses 

131. Outlays 
Total 

TOTAL LIBRARY DEPARTMENT 
State Funds Received 
NET LIBRARY DEPARTMENT 

Motion Carried 

MODERATOR 



PLANNING BOARD 





139. Clerk Hire 


$ 500.00 
14,000.00 
2,500.00 


140. Expenses 

141. Outlays 

142. Consultant 


J17.000.00 


TOTAL PLANNING BOARD 




Motion Carried 




POLICE DEPARTMENT 



$16,640.00 
11,259.00 

9,495.00 
88,372.00 

5,564.00 
13,865.00 

3.077.00 

$148,272.00 



$ 3,500.00 

12,580.00 

50,120.00 

8,000.00 

2.150.00 

$76,350.00 

$224,622.00 



132. Moderator's Salary $ 300.00 

Motion Carried 

NASHOBA VALLEY TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL - Chelmsford 

assessment 47.35% $425,454.00 

Motion Carried 



SALARIES 

143. Officers and Administration 

144. Regular and Special Account 

145. School Traffic Supervisors 
Total 

146. Maintenance and Equipment 

147. IChiefs OUt of State Expense 

148. Outlays 

149. Special and Education, Out of State 

150. Regional Tactical Unit. Expenses 

Total 

TOTAL POLICE DEPARTMENT 

151. Appropriation from Federal Revenue Sharing 



$ 2,080.00 

1,000.00 

250.00 

5.000.00 

$ 8.330.00 



$175,815.00 

765.109.00 

30,765.00 

$971,689.00 

$ 87.696.00 

150.00 

2,500.00 

500.00 

1.00 

$90,847.00 

$1,062,536.00 

164,497.00 

$898,039.00 



TOTAL COST TO TOWN 
Motion Carried 

Finance Committee Chairman Schenk stated that the 
increase under the Officers and Administration applys to 
those employees who are non-union the Captain, Clerks, 
and custodian, and the are receiving a 4% increase. The 
rest of the employees are under negotiations. A discussion 
followed Chief Germann made a motion to amend his 
budget Line Item 144 Regular and Special Account by 
by adding $30,073. for a total line of $795,182. which 
increases the total under Salaries to read $1,001,762. the 
Total Police Dept. Budget to read $1,092,609.00 less_ 
revenue sharing $164,497. for the TOTAL POLICE 
DEPARTMENT of $928,112.00. The Finance 
Committee supports the Board of Selectmen of their 
recommendation they were against the motion. A vote 
was taken on the motion made by Chief Germann. 
Motion Defeated. A vote was taken on the Main Motion. 
Motion Carried 



PARK DEPARTMENT 

133. Labor 

134. Expenses 

135. Outlays 

136. Recreation Field Maintenance Labor 

137. Recreation Field Maintenance Exp. 

TOTAL PARK DEPARTMENT 
Motion Carried 

PERSONNEL BOARD 

138. Expenses 
Motion Carried 



Finance Committee 
Recommendation 



$18,143.00 
4,075.00 
1,200.00 
3,858.00 
2,496.00 

$29,772.00 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT 



SALARIES 

152. Janitor's Salary 

153. Vacation and Sickness 
Total 

EXPENSES 

154. Fuel, Light and Water 

155. Repairs, Equipment and Expenses 

156. Outlays 
Total 

TOTAL PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT 
Motion Carried 



$ 8,171.00 
380.00 



$21,100.00 

12,425.00 

0.00 

$33,525.00 

$42,076.00 



RECREATION COMMISSION 

157. Salaries Directors & Asst. Youth 

158. Expenses, Youth 

159. Outlay 

TOTAL RECREATION DEPARTMENT 
Motion Carried 



$19,448.00 
94,425.00 
10.000.00 

$123,873.00 



Mr. William Dempster moved to table the Recreation Budget till 
Monday May 2,. Mr. Dempster withdrew his motion to table the 
budget. A vote was taken on the Recreation Comm. Budget. 

Motion Carried 

EAST SCHOOL 



160. Expenses $ 7,700.00 

161. Salaries, Custodians 1 00 

162. Recreational Supervisor 1.00 

TOTAL EAST SCHOOL $ 7,702.00 

Motion Carried 

REGISTRARS DEPARTMENT 

SALARIES 

163. Registrars (3) 

164. Asst Registrars: Wages & Mileage 

165. Clerk 

166. Clerk for Board 
Total 

EXPENSES 

167. Printing; Men & Women Directory 

168. Printing: Voters' Lists 

169. Other Expenses 

170. Data Processing 

171. Census 
Total 

TOTAL REGISTRAR'S DEPARTMENT 

Motion Carried 

Mr. Norman LeBreque questioned why the 
department went from a part-time clerk to a full time- 
clerk. Mr. Schenk explained that due to the workload of 
the census it was necessary for the full time clerk. A 
lengthy discussion followed, Mr. LeBreque made a 
motion to amend line #165 to read $4,524. Mr. Edward 
Hilliard spoke against the amendment. A vote was taken 
by voice, which left the chair in doubt. A hand count was 
taken YES 160, NO 168. Motion to amend defeated. A 
vote was taken on the main motion, Motion Carried. 



$ 1,080.00 

0.00 

8,807.00 

884.00 

$10,771.00 



$ 1,100.00 

200.00 

500.00 

2.400.00 

4.700.00 

$ 8.900.00 
$19,671.00 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

SALARIES 

94. Administrtion 

95. Engineer's Fee 

96. Labor-Men 
Total 

EXPENSES 

97. Utilities-Materials-Misc. 

98. Waste Collection 

99. Stabilization Fund 

100. Machine Hire-other 

101 . Snow & Ice 

102. Sidewalks 
Total 
TOTAL HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation from Antiression Fund 

COST TO THE TOWN 

Motion Carried 

Selecman Philip L. Currier moved to adjourned the 
Town Meeting till Wednesday nite April 27, 1977, 
McCarthy Jr. High at 7:30 P.M. 

A Discussion followed, Planning Board Chairman A. 
Robert Rabb explained that the Planning Board had a 
scheduled advertised hearing on Wednesday night, that 
would have to be cancelled. Selectman Lovering 
supported the motion. A vote was taken on the motion, 
motion defeated. Mr. Rabb made a motion to adjourned 
till Monday Night, May 2, 1977, McCarthy Jr. High at 
7:30. Motion carried. 



$ 32,530.00 

10,000.00 

589,290.00 

$631,820.00 



$173,980.00 

70,490.00 

0.00 

6,000.00 

166,905.00 

7,000.00 

$ 424,375.00 

$1,026,195.00 

$ 67,045.00 

$ 989,150.00 



SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 



172. Clerk 

173. Expenses 



0.00 
0.00 



TOTAL SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE $ 0.00 

Motion Carried 

Selectman Paul C. Hart moves to remove from the 
table the Highway Department's Budget with a total 



figure of $989,150. 
Motion carried. 



A vote was taken on the motion. 



34 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN 

MEETING 

May 2, 1977 



The adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to 
order at 7:55 by the Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin Jr. 
who recognized the presence of a quorum. There were 
547 voters present. 



Mrs. Carol Cleven moves that the sum of $13,024,958. 
be raised and appropriated for the operation of the 
Chelmsford Public Schools including vocational 
education, said sum to be reduced by the use of available 
and anticipated federal funds of $106,071. and 
educational collaborative funds of $6,803. to 
$12,912,084. The Finance Committee recommended the 
budget as presented by the School Committee. 
Chairperson of the School Committee Carol elevens 
presented the School Budget: 



Finance Committee 
Recommendation 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

174. School Committee 

175. Superintendent's Office 

176. Supervision 

177. Principals 

178. Teaching 

179. Textbooks 

180. Library 

181. Audio-Visual 

182. Guidance 

183. Career Education 

184. School Attendance 

185. Health Services 

186. Transportation 

187. Food Services 

188. Athletics 

189. Other Student Activities 

190. Driver Education 

191. Health Education 

192. Custodial 

193. Utilities 

194. Maintenance of Grounds 

195. Maintenance of Building 

196. Maintenance of Equipment 

197. Adult Education 

198. Civic Activities 

199. Programs with other schools 



29 

274 

256 

610 

7,448, 

133 

251, 

116, 

347, 

39, 

17, 



636 
548 
19 
64 
73 
20 
10 
15 



400.00 
674.00 
473.00 
868.00 
187.00 
054.00 
105.00 
608.00 
794.00 
338.00 
825.00 
291.00 
000.00 
827.00 
972.00 
000.00 
0.00 
0.00 
342.00 
794.00 
770.00 
,130.00 
,550.00 
,707.00 
,000.00 
,000.00 



Subtotal 


$11,909,709.00 


Chapter 766 


1,115.249.00 


Total 


$13,024,958.00 


Minus PL875 


■106,071.00 



RECEIPTS 

200. State Education Aid Law 

201. School Transportation 

202. Rental of Auditoriums 

203. Custodial Services 

204. Special Education - Chapter 766 

205. Vocational Education 

206. Dog Licenses 

207. Miscellaneous 

208. Adult Evening Education 

209. Education Collaborative fund 

210. Federal Funds 

Total Receipts 
NET COST TO CHELMSFORD 
Motion Carried 



$2,467,658.00 

385.059.00 

0.00 

11,145.00 

321.900.00 

22,479.00 

4,487.00 

3,192.00 

4,245.00 

6,803.00 

106,071.00 

$3,334,400.00 
$9,577,684.00 




A lengthy discussion followed, J. Paul J. Gravell made 
a motion to commit the School budget Article 3, Line 
Items 174 thru 210, back to the School Committee for 
further consideration and reductions, the School 
Committee to report back to this Town Meeting, next 
Monday May 9, if ready. Mr. Gravell made comments 
about his motion, the School Committee opposed the 
motion. More discussion followed, Anthony Cotroneo 
wanted to amend the motion which was still on the floor, 
the Moderator ruled this out of order. Mr. Edward 
Marshall moved the question to stop debate on the 
motion to amend. A show of hands YES 470 NO 12, 
motion carried. On Mr. Gravell's motion to send the 
budget back to the School Committee by voice vote left 
the Chair in doubt the following tellers were appointed: 



Richard Burtt 
Arthur Osborne 
Clement McCarthy 



Ina Greenblatt 

Judy Hass 

Bernice O'Neil 



Connie Fabien 



Subtotal 
Minus Educational Collaborative Funds 

TOTAL TOWN FUNDS 



$12,918,887.00 
6.803.00 

$12,912,084.00 



Mr. Gravell's motion defeated YES 171 NO 284 



Under the main motion (sch. budget) Paul Therrien 
made a motion to amend Line 193 to read $511,945. & 
Line 192 to read $586,631. The Finance Committee was 
against these motions, Mrs. Cleven was also against the 
motion. A voice vote on to amend Line #193 left the chair 



35 



in doubt. A hand count was taken. In the middle of 
taking the hand count, Carol Cleven requested Town 
Counsel's opinion on amending a line item. The 
Moderator decided to hold the opinion until after the 
final vote was taken. On the motion to amend line item 
193, YES 179 NO 256 the motion was defeated. A Voice 
Vote was taken on the motion to amend line #192. 

Under the main motion Eric Eldering made a motion 
to amend line #181, to read $136,472.00. Finance 
Committee opposed the motion. A discussion followed. A 
voice vote was taken motion defeated. Dennis Ready 
made a motion to stop debate on the main motion, a 
voice vote was taken leaving the chair in doubt, hand 
count taken YES 388 NO 39. Motion Carried 

A voice vote was taken on the main motion which left 
the chair in doubt. A hand count was taken YES 309 NO 
114 Motion Carried. Mr. Edward McKeon made a 
motion to move to reconsider the School Budget. A voice 
vote was taken Motion defeated. The moderator then 
recessed for ten minutes. 



Finance Committee 
Recommendation 



SEWER COMMISSION DEPARTMENT 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

211. Salary 

212. Expenses 

TOTAL SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
Motion Carried 
SELECTMEN'S DEPARTMENT 



$ 2,000.00 
300.00 



SALARIES 

213. Chairman 

214. Board Members 

215. Selectmen Administrative Assistant 

216. Labor Relations Advisor 

217. Clerk (Part time) 

218. Senior Clerk (Full time) 

219. Purchasing Agent 

220. Town Planner 

221. Recreation Supervisor 

222. Clerk-Overtime 

223. Superintendent of Eng Landfill Operations 
Total 

EXPENSES 

224. Expenses 

225. Conference Expenses 

226. Outlays 

227. Emergency Employment 

228. Out of State 

229. Purchasing Agent 

230. Local Growth Policy Comm 

231. Photo Copy Machine 

232. Insurance for Selectmen 
Total 

TOTAL SELECTMEN' DEPARTMENT 

Motion Carried 



$15,000.00 
2.000.00 



234. Professional Fee and Services 

235. Expenses 

TOTAL SEWER COMISSION DEPARTMENT $17,000.00 

Motion Carried 

Mr. Richard Sullivan of the Finance Committee makes 
note a change on line 234 to read Professional Fee & 
Services. Sewer Commissioner Theodore Rapallo 
reviewed the budget. 

Motion Carried 



STREET LIGHTING 



$74,000.00 



236. Street Lighting 

Motion Carried 

Mr. Paul Therrien makes a motion to amend Line #236 
to read $54,560. Selectmen Currier explains that the cost 
of just turning on lights is $66,000. with no new lights. A 
voice vote was taken on the motion to amend - Motion 
Defeated, vote taken on the main motion. 

Motion Carried 



TOWN AIDE 

237. Salary 

238. Expenses 

TOTAL TOWN AIDE 
Motion Carried 
TOWN CELEBRATION COMMITTEE 



$ 8,960.00 
1,025.00 



$ 9,985.00 



$ 1,500.00 
4.000.00 
12.241.00 


239. Expenses 
Motion Carried 


$ 5,000.00 


5.000.00 
5.567.00 


TOWN CLERKS DEPARTMENT 




8.806.00 


SALARIES 




0.00 


240. Town Clerk 


$15,340.00 


0.00 


241. Senior Clerk (2) 


17,613.00 


0.00 


242. Clerk (Part-time) 


3,699.00 


1.402.00 


243. Clerk (Overtime) 


884.00 


0.00 


244. Vacation and Sickness 


800.00 


$38,516.00 


Total 
EXPENSES 


$38,336.00 


$ 7,216.00 


245. Expenses 


$ 4,000.00 


1.000.00 


246. Board of Appeals Variance Rec. Fees 


0.00 


0.00 


247. Printing By-Law Books 


300.00 


0.00 


248. Outlays 


1.00 


250.00 
1,245.00 


Total 


$ 4,301.00 


250.00 


TOTAL TOWN CLERK'S DEPARTMENT 


$42,637.00 


5.500.00 
0.00 


Motion Carried 




$15,461.00 


TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE 





249. Expenses 
Motion Carried 



36 



TREASURER & COLLECTOR DEPARTMENT 



SALARIES 








250. Treasurer and Collector 






$18,720.00 


25 1 . Assistant Treasurer 






10,074.00 


252. Senior Clerk (4) 






J35.227.00 


253. Clerk (Part-time) (2) 






9,248.00 


254. Vacation and Sickness 






1.000.00 


Total 






$74,269.00 


EXPENSES 








255. Postage 






$ 9,000.00 


256. Printing Advertising Bind 


ing 


& Stationery 


2,000.00 


257. Bonds 






850.00 


258. Expenses 






3,800.00 


259. Outlays 






1.00 


Total 






$15,651.00 


TOTAL TREASURER & COLLECTOR DEPT. 


$89,920.00 



Motion Carried 
TREE WARDEN'S DEPARTMENT 

SALARIES 

260. Tree Warden 

261. Fees 
Total 

EXPENSES 

262. Other Expenses 

263. Outlay 
Total 

TOTAL TREE WARDEN'S DEPARTMENT 

Motion Carried 

UNCLASSIFIED DEPARTMENTS 



284. Expenses 2,150.00 

285. Outlay 175.00 

286. Cash and Material Grants 80,000.00 

TOTAL VETERAN'S BENEFITS DEPARTMENT $93,350.00 

Motion Carried 

Harry Silveria made a motion to amend Line 282 to 
read $13,000. many persons spoke in favor of this 
amendment. The Finance Committee was against the 
motion. A Voice Vote was taken - to amend motion, 
Motion Defeated. A vote was taken on the main motion 
Motion Carried. 

WIRING INSPECTOR'S DEPARTMENT 



287. Inspector's Fees 

288. Inspector's Salary 

289. Expenses 

290. Senior Clerk (V6) 

291 . Vacation and Sickness 

292. Transportation 

293. Out of Town Expenses 



$ 800.00 




4,000.00 


TOTAL WIRING INSPECT 


$ 4,800.00 


Motion Carried 


$14,150.00 


YOUTH CENTER 


600.00 


294. Salaries 


$14,750.00 


295. Expenses 


$19,550.00 


296. Outlay 




TOTAL YOUTH CENTER 




Motion Carried 



$ 0.00 

14,560.00 

1.000.00 

1.00 

0.00 

1.500.00 

250.00 

$17,311.00 



$23,524.00 
8.618.00 
1,140.00 

$33,282.00 



264. Town & Finance Committee Reports $10,000.00 

265. CATV Committee 50.00 

266. Expenses for Memorial Day 1,500.00 

267. Expenses for Town Clock 300.00 

268. Development & Industrial Commission 0.00 

269. Ambulance Service 10,000.00 

270. Lowell Mental Health Association 8,695.00 

271. Veteran Pension Claims 5.009.00 

272. Chelmsford Industrial Development Financing Authority 0.00 

273. D.P.W. Committee 275.00 

274. Historic District Committee 695.00 

275. Bus Transportation Subsidy 28.000.00 

276. Share Inc. (Drug Rehabilitation) 23,737.00 

277. NMAC Assesment 8,592.00 

278. Unemployment Benefits Due State 10,000.00 



TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED DEPARTMENTS 
Motion Carried 
VARNEY PLAYGROUND 

279. Labor 

280. Expenses 

281. Outlays 

TOTAL VARNEY PLAYGROUND 
Motion Carried 
VETERAN'S BENEFITS DEPARTMENT 

282 . Salary of Veteran's Agent 

283. Clerical 



$ 2.548.00 
3.000.00 
1.600.00 

$ 7,148.00 



$11,024.00 
1.00 



Selectman Philip Currier moves to adjourned until 
Thursday May 5, at the McCarthy Jr. High at 7:30 P.M. 
Motion Carried 

The Town Meeting adjourned at 10:55 P.M. 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

May 5, 1977 

The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to 
order at 7:55 P.M. by the Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin 
Jr. 

Mr. Richard Sullivan of the Finance Committee made 
a motion for the Town Meeting body to meet again on 
Thursday May 12, Motion Carried. 

Mr. A. Robert Raab moves to take articles 50 & 51 out 
of order so that they will be heard directly after the 
Special Town Meeting which is scheduled for the same 
night. Motion Carried. 



37 



Cost as Kevg has questioned the quorum. The 
following tellers were appointed: Connie Fabien, Carl 
Olsson, Richard Burtt, Ina Greenblatt, and Judy Hass. 
Results of the count 204 voters present. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4. Mr. Philip J. McCormack moves 
that the Town vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money 
from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the 
financial year beginning July 1, 1977; in accordance with 
the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44 Section 4 and 
to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, 
and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a 
period of less than one year in a accordance with General 
Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

Finance Committee recommends the article 
Motion Carried unanimously 

UNDER ARTICLE 5. Sel. Philip L. Currier moves that 
the Town vote to request the Department of Corporations 
and Taxation, Division of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts to make an audit of all accounts in all 
departments in the Town of Chelmsford. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 6. Sel. Philip L. Currier moves that 
the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$420,569.00 to pay the Treasurer of Middlesex County 
Retirement System, the said amount being the Town's 
share of the pension, expense and military service funds. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 7. Mr. Schenk of the Finance 
Committee moves that the Town vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $150,000.00 to be used as a 
Reserve Fund at the discretion of the Finance Committee 
as provided in General Laws, Chapter 40 Section 6. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 8. Selectman Philip L. Currier 
moves that the Town vote to adopt the following: Be it 
resolved that the Town of Chelmsford asks its 
representatives in the General Court that there be no 
extension of Compulsory and Binding Arbitration 
beyond its termination date of June 30, 1977. Selectman 
Murphy explained the meaning of the article. The 
Finance Committee is in favor of the article. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 9. Selectman Philip L. Currier 
moves that the Town vote to adopt the following: Be it 
resolved that the Town of Chelmsford asks it 
representatives in the General Court to support an 
increase in the amount of local aid funding for fiscal 1978 
at least sufficient to cover the increased costs of the State 
mandated programs caused by inflation. Selectman 
Murphy explained the article. Mr. J. Paul J. Gravell 



moved to amend the article to read as follows: The Town 
vote to adopt the following: Be it resolved that the Town 
of Chelmsford directs its representatives in General Court 
to support an increase in the amount of local aid funding 
for Fiscal 1978 at least sufficient to cover the cost of the 
State mandated programs. 

Motion Carried, Main motion as amended, Motion 
Carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 10. Selectman Currier moves that 
the Town vote to adopt the following: Be it resolved that 
the Town of Chelmsford asks its representatives in the 
General Court to work against passage of all legislation 
imposing additional costs on local governments unless full 
funding is also voted. Selectman Murphy spoke for the 
article, Mr. J. Paul Gravel moved to amend the article to 
read as follows: To see if the Town will vote to adopt the 
following: Be it resolved that the Town of Chelmsford 
directs its representatives in the General Court to work 
against passage of all legislation imposing additional costs 
on local governments unless full funding is also voted and 
to actively work to recind all legislation which imposes 
directly on the town, to be raised by real estate taxes, 
without providing state funds. 

Motion Carried, Main motion as amended, Motion 
Carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 11. Selectman Currier moves that 
the Town vote to authorize the transfer of reimbursement 
funds in the sum of $645,000.00 received from the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts Flood Relief Board to 
pay a bond, issue note or notes borrowed for the purpose 
of reconstruction of Crystal Lake. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 12. Selectman Philip L. Currier 
moves to withdraw this article. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 13. Mr. Simonian moves that the 
Town will direct the School Building Committee, from 
present bonding authority to erect bleachers and 
appurtenant structures at the site of the new Chelmsford 
High School Football field from specifications furnished 
by the Chelmsford School Administration in an amount 
not to exceed $100,000.00. Mr. Simonian spoke on this 
motion. A discussion followed. The Finance Committee 
made a motion to amend by adding after the last 
sentence, conditional upon the availability of 65% 35% 
reimbursement from the State. 

Motion Carried 

More discussion followed, Harry McKeon moves to 
amend the main motion as amended by striking out 
"From specifications furnished by the Chelmsford School 
Administration". 



38 



Motion Carried 

Main motion as amended: To see if the Town will 
direct the School Building Committee, from present 
bonding authority, to erect bleachers and appurtenant 
structures at the site of the new Chelmsford High School 
football field, in an amount not to exceed $100,000. 00 
conditional upon the availability of 65% 35% 
reimbursement from the state. 

Dolores McGuire moves the question Motion to stop 
debate. Motion Carried, Unanimously. 

Main motion as amended, Motion Carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 14. Mr. Simonian moves to 
withdraw this article. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 15. Mr. Marvin Schenk moves that 
the Town authorize the transfer of $266, 133.33 from free 
cash for principal and interest payment on New High 
School Bond Issue due June 1, 1977. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 16. Mr. James Sullivan moves that 
the Town vote to rescind the sum of $440,000.00 from 
"Loans Authorized" as approved under Article 8 at the 
adjourned Special Town Meeting Held November 15, 
1971. Mr. Sullivan explained the article. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 17. Selectman Currier moves that 
the Town vote to rescind the amount of $1,280,000.00 
from "Loans Authorized" as approved under Article 1 at 
the Special Town Meeting held September 16, 1968, Said 
article authorized the borrowing of $1 ,280,000.00 for the 
construction of sewerage system in accordance with plans 
contained in a report dated June 15, 1964, by Camp. 
Dresser, and McKee, Engineers. As the proposed 
sewerage system for the Town is presently progressing 
under engineering plans other than mentioned, the 
borrowing as authorized under the Article in question is 
ineffective. The Finance Committee recommends the 
article. 

Motion Carried 



UNDER ARTICLE 18. Selectman Currier moves that 
the Town vote to rescind transfer of $2,841.60 from the 
Road Machinery Fund and $10,000.00 from the 
stabilization fund as approved under Article 13 at the 
Adjourned Annual Town Meeting held May 10, 1976. 
Said Article authorized the purchase of several pieces of 
Highway Department equipment which included one 
Front End Loader which purchase was determined to be 
unnecessary. 

Motion Carried 



UNDER ARTICLE 19. Selectman Currier moves that 
the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$6,672.00 to purchase warning and regulatory signs the 
cost of which will be 100% reimbursement by the State. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 20. Selectman Currier moves that 
the Town vote to raise and appropriate $23,040.00 for 
the purchase and/or construction of a Salt Storage shed 
for the Highway Department said shed to be located on 
Town owned property. A question was raised on the 
location of Town owned property. Selectman Currier 
answered that the Board of Health gave the Board of 
Selectmen Town owned property suitable for the shed. 
Pine Hill Road, Carlisle Street McCarthy Jr. High and 
Evergreen St. A discussion followed, a vote was taken on 
the motion. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 21. Selectman Currier moves to 
withdraw this article. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 22. Selectman Currier moves that 
the Town vote to raise and approriate the sum of 
$12,500.00 to be used by the Department of Public 
Works Study Committee to engage professional services 
to study the most effective means of providing certain 
town services. Mr. Gerald Silver of the DPW Study 
Committee explained the article. The Finance 
Committee is in favor of the Article. A voice vote was 
taken which left the Chair in doubt, A hand count taken 
YES 86 NO 82. 

Motion Carried 

The Chair recognized the lack of a quorum. The 
meeting adjourned at 10:00 P.M. Selectman Currier 
moves that the Town Meeting adjourn till 7:30 P.M. 
Thursday May 12, at the McCarthy Jr. High. 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

May 12, 1977 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at 8:00 
P.M. by the Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin who 
recognized the presence of a quorum. There were 671 
voters present. Chairman of the Board of Selectmen 
Philip L. Currier moves that the reading of the 
Constable's return of service and the posting of the 
warrant be waived. It was so voted, unanimously. 
Selectmen Currier moved that the reading of the entire 
warrant be waived. It was so voted. 



39 



The Moderator then appointed the following tellers: 



Judy Hass 
Ina Greenblatt 
Wesley Harper 
David McLachlan 



Carl Olsson 

Charles Fairburn 

Richard Burtt 

Walter Wilkins 



UNDER ARTICLE 1. Selectman Philip L. Currier, 
moves that the Town vote to accept Fletcher Street as laid 
out, relocated or altered by the Board of Selectmen and 
shown by their reports and plans duly filed in the Office 
of the Town Clerk and as set forth on a plan of land 
entitled "Relocation Plan of Fletcher Street in 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts as ordered by the Chelmsford 
Board of Selectmen" dated April 1977 by Emmons, 
Fleming and Bienvenu, Engineers and Surveyors, North 
Billerica, Massachusetts, and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to acquire the land necessary to institute said 
acceptance pursuant to Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 82, Section 24. Providing all construction meets 
with the requirements of any remaining bonds until such 
requirements have been met. Selectman Lovering 
explained that a estimated cost would be $51,000.00 but 
there would be no impact on the tax rate if article is 
passed. The Finance Committee recommends the article. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 2. Selectman Philip L. Currier 
moves that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $5,280.00 for the purpose of paying salaries for 
the supervision of the beach area at Crystal Lake. 
Selectman Murphy explained that the majority of the 
Board is for passage of this article. The Recreation 
Commission is in favor of this article. Chairman of the 
Finance Committee Marvin Schenk, states the Finance 
Committee will only support the article if the amount 
reads $2,500.00 after a discussion Mr. Schenk makes a 
motion for the article to read that the Town vote to Raise 
and appropriate the sum of $2,500.00 for the purpose of 
paying salaries for the supervision of the beach area at 
Crystal Lake. Voice vote left the Chair in doubt - hand 
count YES 268 NO 238. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 3. Selectman Philip L. Currier 
moves that the Town vote to amend the General By- 
Laws, Article VI, Police Regulations, by adding the 
following: 

Regulation of Motor Boats on Crystal Lake 

It shall be unlawful for any person to operate a marine 
or recreational vehicle powered by an engine in excess of 
three (3) horsepower on any portion of Crystal Lake at 
any time. The Board of Selectman asks for support of the 
article. Reginald M. Larkin moves to amend the article 
to read in excess of six (6) horsepower on any portion. 
Finance Committee is in favor of the motion. Motion 
Carried. 



Vote on Main motion as amended. Motion Defeated. 

Selectman Currier asks for reconsideration of Article 3, 
Motion Carried. 

Robert Charpentier moves to amend the article to 
read: That the Town vote to amend the General By-Laws 
Article VI, Police Regulations by adding the following: 

Regulation of Motor Boats on Crystal Lake 

It shall be unlawful for any person to operate a marine 
or recreational vehicle powered by an engine on any 
portion of Crystal Lake at any time. Motion to amend 
carried. 

Vote on main motion as amended. Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 4. Selectman Philip L. Currier 
moves that the Town vote to raide and appropriate the 
sum of $92,000.00 for the engineering and construction 
of sidewalks at the following locations: 

Summer Street, Grove Street, Westford Street, 
Stedman Street, Dalton Road, Chelmsford Street, Boston 
Road, Mill Road. 

Voice vote left the Chair in doubt. Hand count YES 
295 NO 221 

Motion Carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5. Selectman Philip L. Currier 

moves that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 

sum of $16,886.92 with which to meet bills for previous 

years. 

Motion Carried, Unanimously 

UNDER ARTICLE 6. Selectman Philip L. Currier 
moves that the Town vote to transfer the sum of 
$6,500.00 from the Fire Department Officers and 
Administration Account to the Fire Department's 
Maintenance and Equipment Account. 

Motion Carried Unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7. Selectman Philip L. Currier 
moves to withdraw article. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 8. Selectman Philip L. currier 
moves to see if the Town will vote to amend its action 
taken under Article 78 of the Annual Town Meeting 
May 14, 1973 as follows: 

To grant longevity benefits to all permanent employees 
who are members of the respective collective bargaining 
units of the Police Department and Fire Department in 
accordance with the following schedule: 



a. Upon completion of five years of employment, said 
employee shall receive a three percent (3%) increase. 



40 



b. Upon completion of ten years employment, said 
employee shall receive a six percent (6%) increase. 

c. Upon completion of fifteen years of employment, said 
employee shall receive a nine percent (9%) increase. 

d. Upon completion of twenty years of employment, said 
employee shall receive a twelve percent (12%) 
increase. 

This amendment shall not apply to persons employed 
by the Town on the effective date of this amendment in a 
position that would entitle that person to longevity 
benefits under Article 78 of the Annual Town Meeting of 
May 14, 1973. Selectman Currier explains the article. 
The Finance Committee is in favor of the article. 

Motion Carried 

Selectman Philip L. Currier moves to adjourn the 
Special Town Meeting sine die at 9 : 1 P . M . 

Motion Carried 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

May 12, 1977 

The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to 
order by the Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin who 
recognized the presence of a quorum, at 9:12 P.M. 

Mr. A. Robert Raab moves to take article 51 out of 
order prior to article 50. 

UNDER ARTICLE 51. Chairman of the Planning 
Board A. Robert Raab briefly outlined the areas to be 
covered. Mr. Herr the Board's consultant, explained the 
effects of the article. Mr Raab then gave a presentation, 
by reading the Planning Boards recommendation: 
Article 51 would replace the current zoning by-law and 
map with new ones, which are intended to be clearer, 
better organized, reflective of current state law and better 
tuned to current land management needs. At the Public 
hearing held on April 28, with about sixty people present, 
no objections to this article were voiced. The Planning 
Board recommends adoption as presented in the warrant. 
The Finance Committee was in favor of the Article. Mr. 
Joseph Gutwein moves to amend the article by: 
Amending Paragraph 1425, Section (d) page 7 of the 
Proposed Zoning Bylaws dated March 1, 1977, to read (d) 
Utilities and drainage and assurances that sanitary liquid 
waste disposal in and abutting the proposed development 
are adequate to serve the uses contemplated, or will be 
made adequate within the time that construction occurs, 
so that there will be no nuisance, hazard, or inconvience 
to adjacent areas. 

Motion carried to amend. 

A vote by voice taken on the Main Motion as amended, 
Motion Carried Unanimously on the article in its entirety. 



Article Fifty- One as amended in its entirety reads as 
follows: 

ARTICLE X. ADMINISTRATION AND PROCEDURE 

1100. Title, Authority, Purpose 

1110. Title. This bylaw shall be known as and 
may be cited as the "Zoning Bylaw of the Town of 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts", hereinafter referred 
to as "this bylaw". 

1120. Authority. This bylaw is adopted pursuant 
to the provisions of Chapter 40A of the General 
Laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and 
amendments thereto, hereinafter referred to as 
the "Zoning Act". 

1130. Purpose. It shall be the purpose of this By- 
law to lessen congestion in the streets; to conserve 
health; to secure safety from fire, flood, panic and 
other dangers; to provide adequate light and air; 
to prevent overcrowding of land; to avoid undue 
concentration of population; to encourage housing 
for persons of all income levels; to facilitate the 
adequate provision of transportation, water 
supply, drainage, sewerage, schools, parks, open 
space and other requirements; to conserve the 
value of land and buildings including the 
conservation of natural resources and the pre- 
vention of blight and pollution of the environment; 
to encourage the most appropriate use of land 
throughout the town, including consideration of 
the recommendations of the master plan, if any, 
adopted by the Chelmsford Planning Board and 
the comprehensive plan, if any, of the regional 
planning agency; and to preserve and increase 
amenities. 

12.00 Administration 



1210. Responsibility. This Bylaw shall be enforced 
by the Building Inspector, who shall thake such 
action as may be necessary to enforce full 
compliance with the provisions of this Bylaw and 
of permits and variances issued hereunder, 
including notification of non-compliance and 
request for legal action through the Selectmen 
to the Town Counsel. 

1220. Compliance Certification. Buildings, 
structures, or land may not be erected, sub- 
stantially altered, or changed in use without 
certification by the Building Inspector that such 
action is in compliance with then applicable 
zoning, or without review by him regarding 
whether all necessary permits have been received 
from those governmental agencies from which 
approval is required by federal, state, or local 
law. Issuance of a Building Permit or Certificate 



41 



of Use and Occupancy, where required under the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts State Building 
Code, may serve as such certification. 

1230. Professional Inspection. Construction on 
projects under a single building permit involving 
either one or more structures (other than one- 
and two-family dwellings) each containing 35,000 
cubuic feet of volume or more, or involving 50 
or more dwelling units, irrespective of type, shall 
be done with the inspection of a registered 
professional engineer or architect, retained by the 
developer. Such engineer or architect shall 
periodically, as requested by the Building Inspector, 
attest that all work being done under his 
supervision is being done in accordance with the 
plans as approved for a building permit, in 
accordance with any stipulations of applicable 
permits, special permits, or variances, and in 
accordance with all applicable town and state 
codes and regulations. Discrepancies from the 
above noted by such engineer or architect shall 
be reported forthwith to the Building Inspector. 

1240. Penalty. Any person violating any of the 
provisions of this Bylaw shall be fined not more 
than $100 for each offense. Each day that such 
violation continues shall constitute a separate 
offense. 



1300. Board of Appeals 

1310. Establishment. The Board of Appeals shall 
consist of five members and three associate 
members, who shall be appointed by the 
Selectmen and shall act in all matters under this 
Bylaw in the manner prescribed by Chapters 40A, 
40B, and 41 of the General Laws. 

1320. Powers. The Board of Appeals shall have 
and exercise all the powers granted to it by 
Chapters 40A, 40B, and 41 of General Laws and 
by this Bylaw. The Board's powers are as follows: 

1321. To hear and decide applications for Special 
Permits upon which the Board is empowered 
to act under this Bylaw, in accordance with 
Section 1500. 

1322. To hear and decide appeals or petitions for 
variances from the terms of this Bylaw, 
including variances for use, with respect to 
particular land or structures. Such variance 
shall be granted only in cases where the 
Board of Appeals finds all of the following: 
(a) A literal enforcement of the provisions 
of this Bylaw would involve, a substantial 
hardship, financial or otherwise, to the 
petitioner or appellant. 



(b) The hardship is owing to circumstances 
relating to the soil conditions, shape or 
topography of such land or structures and 
especially affecting such land or structures 
but not affecting generally the zoning 
district in which it is located. 

(c) Desirable relief may be granted without 
either: 

(1) substantial detriment to the public 
good; or 
(2) nullifying or substantially derogating 
from the intent of purpose of this Bylaw. 

1323. To hear and decide other appeals. Other 
appeals will also be heard and decided by 
the Board of Appeals when taken by: 

(a) Any person aggrieved by reason of his 
inability to obtain a permit or enforcement 
action from any administrative officer 
under the provisions of Ch. 40A, G.L.; 
or by 

(b) The Northern Middlesex Area Planning 
Council; or by 

(c) Any person including any officer or 
Board of the Town of Chelmsford or of 
any abutting town, if aggrieved by any 
order or decision of the Building Inspector 
or other administration official, in violation 
of any provision of Ch. 40 A, G.L.; or this 
Bylaw. 

1324. To issue Comprehensive Permits. Compre- 
hensive Permits for construction may be 
issued by the Board of Appeals for 
construction of low or moderate-income 
housing by a public agency or limited 
dividend or non-profit corporation, upon 
the Board's determination that such con- 
struction would be consistent with local 
needs, whether or not consistent with local 
zoning, building, health, or subdivision 
requirements, as authorized by Sec. 20-23, 
Ch. 40 B, G.L. 

1325. To issue withheld Building Permits. Building 

Permits withheld by the Building Inspector 
acting under Sec. 81 Y, Ch. 41, G.L., as 
a means of enforcing the Subdivision 
Control Law may be issued by the Board of 
Appeals where the Board finds practical 
difficulty or unnecessary hardship, and if 
the circumstances of the case do not 
require that the building be related to a 
way shown on the subdivision plan in 
question. 

1330. Public Hearings. The Board of Appeals 
shall hold public hearings in accordance with the 
provisions of Chapters 40A, 40B, and 41 of the 



General Laws on all appeals and petitions brought 
before it. 

1340. Repetitive Petitions. Repetitive petitions. 
Repetitive petitions for exceptions, appeals and 
petitions for variances, and applications to the 
Board of Appeals shall be limited as provided in 
Section 16 of Chapter 40A, General Laws. 



1400. Planning Board 



1410. Special Permits. In instances where this 
Bylaw provides for Special Permits to be 
acted upon by the Planning Board, those actions 
shall be based upon the considerations of Section, 
1500. 

1420. Site Plan Review 



1421. No permit for the construction, alteration, 
reconstruction, relocation or change of use 
shall be issued for the categories listed at 
Section 1423 without referral of the 
applicant's proposals to the Planning 
Board, and the receipt of said Board's 
written approval thereof by the Inspector 
of Buildings, unless thirty-five days have 
elapsed without receipt of such report from 
the Planning Board. 

1422. At the time of application for a building 
or occupancy permit, a site plan, as 
required in Section 1424, shall be trans- 
mitted to the Planning Board in two copies, 
together with all supporting documentation. 
The applicant may, prior to submitting his 
application, request in writing to the 
Planning Board, a waiver of one or more 
of the requirements of Section 1424 by 
submitting a preliminary plan sufficient to 
describe the proposed development and 
conferring thereon with the Planning 
Board at a regular meeting. The Planning 
Board shall prepare a written report, 
within fourteen days of its conference with 
the applicant, on the waiver request which 
shall accompany the application recom- 
mending either (a) that the applicant's 
preliminary plan is sufficient for review and 
is either approved not approved or approved 
with certain changes by the Planning 
Board without furhter review by them, or, 
(b) that a site plan under Section 142 A 
is necessary and must be submitted to the 
Planning Board, or, (c) a modified site 
plan, with specifically named elements, is 
necessary and must be submitted to the 
Planning Board. 



1423. The following types of applications, either 
for a building permit, an occupancy 
permit, or a special permit for exception 
shall be subject to Planning Board site plan 



(a) any proposed commercial or industrial 
development involving construction of 
3,000 sq. ft. floor area or more. 

(b) any multi-family construction, or multi 
family residential development. 

(c) any proposed alteration, expansion or 
change in a parking area for eight or 
more cars, or off-street loading area 
abutting a residential or institutional use. 

(d) any proposed construction, alteration, 
relocation, or structural or use change in a 
Flood Plain District defined in Section 
2700 of this Bylaw. 

(e) any proposed construction, alteration, 
relocation or structural or use change of a 
non-residential building or structure of 
greater than 3,000 square feet of ground 
floor area in an RA, RB or RC District. 

1424. Site Plan. Unless waived in accordance 
with recommendations of the Planning 
Board as provided for in subsection 1422, a 
site plan shall be prepared in conformity 
with the following requirements. No waiver 
of these requirements shall be permitted 
unless the scope of the applicant's proposal 
is such that it is evident that adequate 
review and compliance with this Bylaw can 
be obtained with lesser requirements. 

(a) The site plan shall be prepared by a 
registered, Architect, Landscape Architect, 
Professional Engineer, or Land Surveyor. 

(b) The site plan shall show the boundaries 
of the lot or lots in the proposed 
development, proposed structures, drives, 
parking, landscaping, screening, fences, 
walls, walks, outdoor lighting, utilities, 
drainage, topography and final grading at 
two foot contour, intervals, all facilities 
for refuse and sewage disposal and disposal 
or storage of all wastes, loading facilities, 
all recreation facilities proposed, all open 
space areas proposed, the location, size, 
and design of all proposed, all open space 
areas proposed, the location, size, and 
design of all proposed signs, the location 
of all hydrants, fire alarm and fire 
fighting facilities on site, all wetland areas 
and areas included in a Flood Plain 



43 



District, the ground floor plan, architec- 
tural elevations of all proposed buildings, 
and any other matters necessary to describe 
the proposed development. 

(c) The site plan shall be accompanied 
by a written statement indicating the 
estimated time required to complete the 
proposed project and any and all phases 
thereof. 

(d) There shall be submitted a written 
estimate, showing in detail the costs of all 
site improvements planned. 

(e) A written summary of the contem- 
planted project shall be submitted with the 
site plan indicating where appropriate, the 
number of dwelling units to be built and 
the acreage in residential use, the evidence 
of compliance with parking and off-street 
loading requirements, the forms of owner- 
ship contemplated for the property and a 
summary of the provisions of any ownership 
or maintenance thereof, indentification 
of all land that will become common 
or public land, and any other evidence 
necessary to indicate compliance with this 
Bylaw. 

(f) The site plan shall be accompanied by 
drainage calculations by a Registered 
Professional Engineer. Storm drainage 
design must conform to Town of Chelmsford 
Subdivision Regulations. 

1425. Planning Board Approval. The Planning 
Board shall approve the site plan when the 
following requirements are satisfied; 

(a) Internal circulation and egress are such 
that traffic flow is adequately served and 
the safety of individuals is protected, and 
further that access via minor streets serving 
residential neighborhoods is minimized. 

(b) Visibility of parking areas from public 
ways is minimized and adequate screening 
measures are taken to minimize headlight 
glare from parking lots adjacent to 
residential areas, to minimize floodlight 
glare from parking areas, and to confine 
vehicles to the parking are and restrict 
them from using adjacent properties. 

(c) Adequate access to each structure for 
fire emergency and service equipment is 
provided. 

(d) Utilities and drainage and assurances 
that sanitary liquid waste disposal in and 



abutting the proposed development are 
adequate to serve the uses contemplated, or 
will be made adequate within the time that 
construction occurs, so that there will be no 
nuisance, hazard, or inconvenience to 
adjacent areas. 

(e) Major totographic changes or removal 
of existing tress or other important natural 
elements of the site will be minimized. 

(f) Effective use is made of topography, 
landscaping, building placement, and 
building design to maintain, to the degree 
feasible, the character of the neighborhood. 

(g) Particular care is taken in the plan to 
provide a reasonable degree of compatibility 
between the proposed development and 
adjacent areas through the use of natural 
buffer strips, screening, and the location of 
like uses or like intensity along the boundary 
where other uses, particularly residential 
uses, exist or are permitted. 

(h) The site plan and supporting data 
clearly indicate that noise, odor, glare, 
flashing and other such elements shall be 
effectively confined to the area as required 
in Section 3200, Environmental Protection 
Standards. 

(i) The appropriate amount of parking is 
provided and efforts are made to avoid 
where possible overly expansive parking 
areas by utilizing raised planting strips, 
trees, and similar landscape features. 

(j) Pedestrian circulation is provided for 
within the development and there is a 
rational linkage of the system within the 
development to existing or potential circu- 
lation outside. 

(k) That all other requirements of this 
Bylaw applicable to the site plan have been 
satisfied. 

1426. Conformity. A site plan which has been 
approved by the Planning Board and 
approved by the Inspector of Buildings or 
Board of Appeals, as the case may be, shall 
become a part of the building permit(s) 
and continuing conformance therewith 
shall be the basis for issuance of occupancy 
permits. If construction fails to follow the 
approved site plan, all permits shall be 
revoked until compliance is assured. No 
such revocation or suspension of permits 
shall be permitted to exceed six months 
duration without submission of a new site 



44 



plan and supporting documents and review 
and approval as provided for in this Secion. 
The Inspector of Buildings shall periodically 
inspect progress and compliance with the 
provisions herein and with the approved 
site plan and shall take whatever action is 
required consistent with the above and with 
Section 1230 of this Bylaw. Where the site 
improvements required for conformity with 
this Bylaw, including screeing, landscaping, 
parking, off-street loading facilities, access 
roads and drives, and other similar 
required improvements are extensive, the 
approving authority, as provided herein, 
may require a performance bond or other 
performance guarantees in a form 
complying with those provided for in the 
Rules and Regulations of the Planning 
Board of the Town of Chelmsford. Such 
required performance guarantee shall be 
properly executed and submitted to the 
approval authority before any building or 
occupancy permits for the development 
shall be issued. Release of performance 
guarantee shall not occur until such time as 
construction has been completed in 
compliance with this Bylaw and the 
approved site plan. 



1500. Special Permits 

1510. Public Hearing. Special permits shall only 
be issued following public hearing sheld within 
sixty-five days after filing with the special permit 
granting authority an application, a copy of which 
shall forthwith be given to the town clerk by the 
applicant. 

1520. Criteria. Special permits for exceptions 
shall normally be granted where specific provisions 
of this Bylaw are met, except when particulars 
of the location or use, not generally true of the 
district or of the uses permitted in it, would cause 
granting of such permit to be to the detriment 
of the public interest because: 

1521. it appears that the performance standards 
of Section 3200 or other requirements of 
this Bylaw cannot or will not be met, or 

1522. traffic generated or patterns of access or 
egress would cause congestion, hazard, or 
substantial change in established neighbor- 
hood character, or 

1523. the continued operation of or the develop- 
ment of adjacent uses as permitted in the 
Zoning Bylaw would be adversely affected 
by the nature of the proposed use, or 



1524. nuisance or hazard would be created to the 
detriment of the health, safety and/or 
welfare of the occupants of the proposed 
use or the citizens of the Town, or 

1525. for other reasons, the proposed use would 
impair the integrity of the district or 
adjoining district, or otherwise derogate 
from the intent and purpose of this Bylaw. 

1530. Conditions. Special permits may be granted 
with such reasonable conditions, regulations, or 
limitations as the special permit granting authority 
may deem necessary to serve the purposes of this 
Bylaw. 

1540. Expiration. Special permits shall expire 
upon transfer of ownership prior to initiation 
of substantial construction on the site, or if a 
substantial use thereof or construction has not 
begun, except for good cause, within 12 months of 
Special Permit approval (plus such time required 
to pursue or await the determination of an appeal 
referred to in Section 17, Ch. 40 A, G.L., from the 
grant thereof. ) 

1600. Amendments 



This bylaw may from time to time be changed by 
amendment, addition, or repeal by the town meeting in 
the manner provided in Ch. 40A, G. L. , as amened. 

1700. Court Appeal 

Any person aggrieved by a decision of the Board of 
Appeals or any special permit granting authority, 
whether or not previously a party to the proceeding, or 
any municipal officer or board may, as provided in 
Section 17, Ch. 40A, G.L., appeal to the Superior Court 
or to the Land Court by bringing an action within twenty 
days after the decision has been filed in the office of the 
Town Clerk. 

1800. Applicability 

1810. Other Laws. Where the application of this 
Bylaw imposes greater restrictions than those 
imposed by any other regulations, permits, 
easements, covenants or agreements, the provisions 
of this Bylaw shall control . 

1820. Minima. The regulations set by this Bylaw 
shall be the minimum regulations and shall apply 
uniformly to each class or kind of structure or use 
and, particularly: 

1821. No building, structure, or land shall 
hereafter be used or occupied, and no 
building or structure shall be erected, 
raised, moved, placed, reconstructed, 
extended, enlarged, or altered except in 



45 



conformity with the regulations specified 
herein for the district in which it is located. 

1822. No building shall hereafter be used, 
erected, or altered to accommodate or 
house a greater number of families; to 
occupy a greater percentage of lot area; 
to exceed the height or bulk requirements; 
or to have narrower or smaller rear yards, 
front yards, side yards, than is specified 
herein. 

1823. No yard or other open space, or off-street 
parking or loading area, or any portion 
thereof, provided for any building, structure, 
or use in conformity with this Bylaw shall 
be included as part of the yard, open 
space or off-street parking or loading area 
similarly required for any other building, 
structure, or use, unless specifically allowed 
in this Bylaw. 

1900. Validity 

The invalidity of any section or provision of this Bylaw 
shall not invalidate any other section or provision thereof. 



ARTICLE II. DISTRICT REGULATIONS 

2100. Establishment of Districts 

For the purpose of this Bylaw, the Town of Chelmsford is 
hereby divided into the following types of districts: 



Single Residence Districts 
General Residence District 
Multiple Residence District 
Neighborhood Commercial District 
Roadside Commercial District 
Shopping Center District 
General Commercial District 
Limited Industrial District 
Special Industrial District 



RA, RB 
RC 
RM 
CA 
CB 
CC 
CD 
IA 
IS 



The boundaries ol each district are hereby established as 
shown, defined, and bounded on the map accompanying 
this Bylaw and on file with the Clerk of the Town of 
Chelmsford, entitled, "Zoning Map", originally dated 
May. 1963. as most recently amended. All explanatory 
matter thereon is hereby made a part of this Bylaw. And. 

(a) where the boundary lines are shown upon said 
map as approximately following the street lines of 
public and private ways or railways, the center- 
lines of such ways shall be the boundary lines. 

(b) where the boundary lines are shown 
approximately on the location of property lot 
lines, and the exact location of property, lot. or 
boundary lines is not indicated by means of 



dimensions shown in figures, then the property or 
lot lines shall be the boundary lines. 

(c) boundary lines located outside of street lines 
and shown approximately parallel thereto shall be 
regarded as parallel to such street lines, and 
dimensions shown in figures placed upon said 
map between such boundary lines and street lines 
are distance in feet of such boundary lines from 
such street lines; such distances being measured 
at right angles to such street lines unless otherwise 
indicated. 

(d) in all cases which are not covered by other 
provisions of this section, the location of boundary 
lines shall be determined by the distance in feet, 
if given, from other lines upon said map, by the 
use of identifications as shown on the map, or 
by the scale of the map. 

(e) where the district boundary line follows a 
stream, lake, or other body of water, said 
boundary line shall be construed to be at 
the thread or channel of the stream, or at the 
limit of the jurisdiction of the Town of Chelmsford, 
unless otherwise indicated. 

(f) where a district boundary line divide any lot 
existing at the time such line is adopted, the 
regulations of any district in which the lot has 
frontage on a street may be extended not more 
than thirty feet into the other district. 

2200. Use Regulations 

2210. Application. No building or structure shall 
be erected, and no premises shall be used, 
except as set forth in the Use Regulations 
Schedule. 

2220. Uses Not Listed. If a particular use is not 
specifically included in the Use Regulations 
Schedule, then the Board of Appeals may 
determine whether in the district in which an 
unlisted use is proposed, uses having similar 
externally observable attributes are or may be 
permitted, and if so, the Board of Appeals 
may authorize such use or uses as a special 
permit for exception under Section 1500. 

2230. Symbols. In the following Use Regulations 
Schedule, symbols shall mean the following: 



P 
O 
BA 



PB 



A permitted use 

An excluded or prohibited use. 

A use authorized under Special Permit for 

Exception from the Board of Appeals as 

provided for in Section 1500. 

A use authorized under Special Permit for 

Exception from the Planning Board as 

provided for in Section 1500. 



2300, Use Regulations Schedule 



46 



RA RB RC RM CA CB CC CD IA IS 



Business Uses 

Retail stores and services not elsewhere listed 
Motor Vehicle 

Sales, rental 

General repair 2 

Light service, parts 2 

Restaurant 

Fast Food Establishment 

Business, Professional Offices 

Medical Center, Clinic 

Bank, Finance Agency 

Indoor Commercial Recreation 

Outdoor Commercial Recreation 

Fairs, Carnivals, Similar Events (See Sec. 4300) 

Animal Kennel or Hospital 

Funeral Home 

Nursing or Convalescent Home 



O O 



O O 



O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


p 


BA 


O 


O 


O 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


p 


O 


O 


P 


P 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


p 


BA 


C 


O 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


p 


P 


P 


O 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


BA 


O 


O 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


P 1 


p 


P 


P 


P 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


P 1 


p 


P 


P 


P 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


P 1 


p 


P 


P 


O 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


p 


P 


BA 


O 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


O 


O 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


o 


o 


o 


o 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


P 


P 


P 


O 


O 



BA 



O BA 



O O 



Industrial Uses 

Earth Removal (see Sec. 4200) 

Light Industry 

Warehouses and Open Storage 

Junk Yard 

Contractor's Yard 

Granite Operations 

Public Utility or Public Works Storage Yard or 

Repair Shop 
Reserarch, Experimental and Testing Laboratory 
Solid Waste Disposal Facility 
Transport Terminal 



o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


BA 


BA 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


p 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


p 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


BA 


o 


o 


p 


p 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


p 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


BA 


o 


o 


p 


p 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


p 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


BA 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


p 


O 



Institutional Uses 
Religious Purposes 
Educational Purposes 

Exempt by Statute 

Other Nursery Schools 

Other Schools 
Cemetery 
Municipal Building Except Garages, Storage 

Yards or Repair Shops 
Hospital 
Other Public or Semi-Public 

Institution of a Historic, Philanthropic, or 

Charitable Character 



p 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


P 


P 


P 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


O 


P 


P 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


P 


O 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


p 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


O 


P 


O 


O 


BA 


O 



BA BA BA BA BA BA BA BA BA BA 



Recreational Use s 
Club or Lodge 

Riding Academy or Public Stables 
Boathouse, Private 
Boathouse, Public 
Golf Course 
Campground 



O 


O 


BA 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


o 


BA 


O 


O 


O 


BA 


O 


O 


BA 


BA 


p 


P 


BA 


PB 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


o 


O 


O 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 



47 



Residential Uses 

Single-family Dwelling 

Two-family Dwelling 

Multi-family Dwelling 

Conversion of Dwellings (see Sec. 2560) 

Motel or Hotel 

Non-family Accommodations 

Mobile Home 

Rural Uses 



Farm, 5 acres or more 
Farm, under 5 acres 3 
Wood Operation 
Wildlife Raising 

Other Principal Uses 

Airport 

Temporary Structure 

Accessory Uses 

Mobile Home Storage 

Roadside Stand 

Home Occupation (see Sec. 41 10) 

Barn Sale, Garage Sale, Yard Sale, Flea Market, 

(Sec. 4130) 
Scientific Uses (see Sec. 4140) 
Retail sale of goods the majority of which are 

produced or undergo major processing on the 

premises 

Notes to Use Regulations Schedule 

1 - Except "O" for any establishment over 3,000 sq. ft. gross floor area. 

2 - Provided there are no structures, pumps, or fuel storage tanks within fifty feet of a residential lot or residential district. 

3 - Provided that there are neither hogs nor fur-bearing animals. 



p 


P 


P 


P 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


o 


O 


P 


P 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


o 


O 


O 


PB 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


o 


O 


P 


P 


O 


P 


O 


P 


O 


O 


o 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


PB 


PB 


O 


O 


o 


O 


P 


O 


P 


P 


P 


P 


O 


O 


o 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


p 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


p 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


o 


P 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


P 


P 


p 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


o 


O 


O 


O 


o 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


p 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


o 


O 


O 


O 


o 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


o 


P 


P 


P 


p 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


p 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


p 


P 


P 


P 


P 


P 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


BA 


O 


O 


O 


O 


P 


P 


P 


P 


BA 


BA 



2400. Nonconforming Uses 

The lawful use of any structure or land existing at the 
time of enactment or subsequent amendment of this 
Bylaw may be continued although such structure or use 
does not conform with provisions of the Bylaw, subject to 
the following conditions and exceptions: 

2410. Abandonment. A nonconforming use 
which has been abandoned or doscontinued for a 
period of two years or more shall note be re- 
established and any future use shall conform with 
the Bylaw. 

2420. Extension or Alteration. As provided in 
Section 6 of Chapter 40A, G.L., pre-existing 
nonconforming structures or uses may be extended 
or altered, provided that no such extension or 
alteration shall be permitted unless there is a 
finding by the Board of Appeals that such 
extension or alteration shall not be substantially 
more detrimental to the neighborhood than the 
existing nonconforming use. 



2430. Operation Continuance. Construction or 
operations under a building or special permit shall 
conform to any subsequent amendment of this By- 
law unless the use or construction is commenced 
within a period of six months after the issuance 
of the permit and in cases involving construction, 
unless such construction is continued through to 
completion as continuously and expeditiously as is 
resonable. 

2440. Restoration. No nonconforming structure, 
other than a single or two-family dwelling, 
damaged by fire, storm , or other accidental 
causes to the extent of more than seventy-five 
(75) percent of its replacement value shall be 
repaired except in conformity with this Bylaw, 
and provided further that such restoring shall be 
completed within two years after such catastrophe. 

2450. Changes. Once changed to a conforming 
use, no structure or land shall be permitted to 
revert to a nonconforming use. 



48 



2500. Intensity of Use Regulations 

2510. Building. All building in any district shall 
meet the minimum requirements set forth in the 
following Intensity of Use Schedule unless other- 
wise expressly provided by this Bylaw or by Section 
CofCh. 40A, G.L. 

2520. Lot Change. No lot shall be created, nor 
shall an existing lot be changed in size or shape 
except through a public taking, or except where 
otherwise permitted herein, so as to result in 
violation of the requirements set forth in the 
following Intensity of Use Schedule. 

2530. Isolated Lots. Any increase in area, 
frontage, width, yard or depth requirements of 
this Bylaw shall not apply to a lot for single and 
two-family residential use which at the time of 
recording or endorsement, whichever occurs 
sooner, was not held in common ownership with 
any adjoining land, conformed to then existing 
requirements, and had less than the proposed 
requirement but at least five thousand square feet 
of area and fifty feet of frontage. 

2540. Accessory Building. No accessory building 
or structure, except a permitted sign or roadside 
stand, shall be loaded within a required front 
yard area. A detached accessory building may be 
located in the rear yard areas and on the same 
lot as the principal building, provided that not 
more than twenty-five percent of the required 
yard area shall be so occupied, and further 
provided that an accessory building shall not be 
located nearer than ten feet from the principal 
building and at least five feet from any side 
or rear lot line. An accessory building attached to 
its principal building or within ten feet of it shall 
be considered an integral part thereof and as such 
shall be subject to the front, side, and rear yard 
requirements applicable to the principal building. 

2550. Erection of More Than One Principal 
Building on a Lot. In any district, more than one 
principal building or sturcture may be erected or 
moved onto a lot provided that area and yard 
requirements can be met as though each sturcture 
were located on an individual lot, and provided 
that the plans therefor are reviewed by the 
Planning Board in accordance with Section 1420. 

2560. Conversion of Dwelling Units. Alteration 
of a single-family dwelling, existing at the time of 
adoption of this bylaw, for occupancy by not more 
than two families, is permitted, in accordance 
with Section 2300 of this Bylaw, provided that the 
lot contains not less than 15,000 square feet; that 
the exterior design of the structure is not changed 
from the character of a single-family dwelling; 



and provided further that at least 600 square feet 
of living space shall be provided for each resulting 
dwelling unit. 

2600. Intensity of Use Schedule 

RA. 

RB RC RM CA CB CC CD IA IS 

Minimum Lot Requirements 
Area 

(1000s.f.) h 40 20 40 a 20 40 b 100 b 40 40 C 

Width (feet) 150 125 150 125 150 b 200 b 150 150 

Depth (feet) 150 125 150 125 b 200 b 150 150 

Frontage (feet) 150 125 150 125 150 b 200 b 150 150 

Minimum Yard Requirements 
Front (feet) 40 20 40 20 20 20 40^ 40S 



Side (feet) 25 12 25 e 1 1 

Rear (feet) 30 20 30° 20 20 



()' 40^ 40R 



30R 30* 



Maximum Building 
Coverage (%) 15 20 15 30 30 30 40 40 30 
Height (feet) 35 45 35 35 45 35 45 45 45 

Landscaped Open Space 
Min. % of 

lot area 10 10 10 10 10 1 10* 

Min. sq. ft. per 
dwelling unit 2000 2000 

Footnotes to Intensity of Use Schedule 

a. For multi-family dwellings, not less than 80,000 
square feet for the first dwelling unit and 3,000 
square feet per unit for each dwelling unit thereafter. 

b. Requirements for the RC district shall apply to 
residential uses permitted in the CB and CD districts. 

c. For Solid Waste Disposal Facility or Granite 
Operations, the minimum shall be 10 acres. 

d. Corner lots shall maintain front yard requirements 
for each street frontage. 

e. Increase by 35 feet where abutting an RA or RB 
district. At least 25 feet of any or all such yards 
abutting an RA or RB district shall be landscaped 
open space or natural screening subject to Section 
3400 of this Bylaw. 

f. Increase to 20 feet when abutting a residential 
district or use. Required side and rear yards 
abutting any residential district or use shall be 
landscaped open space and screened subject to 
Section 3400. 

g. Increase to 100 feet when abutting a residential 
district; 20 feet of this shall be landscaped open space. 

h. For non-family accomodations, increase minimum lot 
area by 10% for each person accommodated in excess 
of eight. 

i. Required to be located in front yards. 

2718. Purpose. The purposes of this District are: 

— To provide the lands in the Town of Chelmsford 
subject to seasonal or periodic flooding as 
described hereinafter shall not be used for 
residence or other purposes in such manner as to 



49 



endanger the health or safety of the occupants 
thereof. 

To protect, preserve, and maintain the water 
table and water recharge areas within the Town so 
as to preserve present and potential water supplies 
for the public health and safety of the residents of 
the Town of Chelmsford. 

— To assure the continuation of the natural 
flow of the water course(s) within the Town of 
Chelmsford in order to provide adequate and safe 
floodwater storage capacity to protect persons 
and property against the hazards of flood 
inundation. 

2720. District Definition. The Flood Plain 
District Boundaries are defined as all areas 
designated on the attached map, entitled Flood 
Plain District Map, Town of Chelmsford, 1973, 
which is incorporated herein by reference: 

(a) Whose elevation above mean sea level 
based on the U.S. Coast and Geodetic 
Datum and specified on U.S. Geologic 
Survey Quadrants is at or below the 
elevation specified. 

(b) Whose distance from the thread of the 
indicated waterway or waterbody is equal 
to or less than that specified. 

2730. District Delineations (Refers to Areas 
Correspondingly Numbered on Floodplain Zoning 
Map) 

1. Swains Pond (Deep Brook, Scotty Hollow), 
120.0 feet MSL, South of Dunstable Road. 

2., 3., 4., 5. Stony Brook, 100.0 feet MSL, 
southwest of Boston and Maine Railroad 

6. Crooked Springs Brook, 130.00 feet MSL, 
southeast of Crooked Spring Road and north of 
Graniteville Road. 

7. Route 3 interchange, 140.00 feet MSL, west of 
Drum Hill Rotary and between Old Westford 
Road and Route 3. 

8. Black Brook, 120.00 feet MSL, south of Smith 
Street, west of Steadman Street. 

9. Brook running to Middlesex Canal, 110.0 feet 
MSL, Arlington Street to eastern Chelmsford- 
Lowell Town Line. 

10., 11., 12. River Meadow, 110.00 feet MSL, 
Chelmsford- Lowell Town Line to Mill Dam south 
of Mill Road. 

13. Blood Brook a.k.a. Hale's Brook, 100.00 feet 
MSL, south of Lowell -Chelmsford Town Line to 



Route 495. 

14. Blood Brook, a.k.a. Hale's Brook, 110.00 feet 
MSL, south of Route 495, to southeastern 
Chelmsford-Billerica Town Line. 

15. Concord River, 107.00 feet MSL, east of 
Gorham Street to the easter Chelmsford-Billerica 
Town Line. 

16., 17. Russell Mill Pond, 130.00 feet MSL, Mill 
Dam south of Mill Road to Chelmsford's Carlisle 
Town Line. 

18. Putnam Brook and Farley Brook, 170.00 feet 
MSL, south of Parker Road, and Acton Road, 
east of Burning Tree Lane, north of Sierra Drive, 
and West of Old Stage Road. 

19. Putnam Brook, 100.00 feet MSL, east of Park 
Road and south of Acton Road. 

20. Pond, 197.00 feet MSL, north of Chelmsford- 
Carlisle Town Line, west of Park Road, south- 
easterly of Acton Road. 

21. South, inlet to Heart Pond, 200 feet MSL, 
east of the Chelmsford-Westford Town Line, 
southeast of Acton Road, and north and west of 
Sleigh Road. 

22., 23. Heart Pond, 197.00 feet MSL, south of 
Parkerville Road, of Maple Road, and NORTH 
OF Acton Road. 

24. Beaver Brook (West), 200.00 feet MSL, east 
of the Chelmsford-Westford Town Line, North of 
Parkerville Road, southeast of Littleton Road, 
and west of Garrison Road. 

25. Beaver Brook (East), 190.00 feet MSL, south 
of Littleton Road, west of New York, New Haven, 
and Hartford (NY, NH & H RR) right-of-way, 
northeasterly of Garrison Road. 

26. Beaver Brook, 180.00 feet MSL, east of NY, 
NH & H RR right-of-way, south of High Street, 
and west of Locust Street. 

27. Beaver Brook, 170.00 feet MSL, north of the 
NY, NH & H RR right-of-way, south of Interstate 
Route 495, and west of the first bridge on 
Littleton Road. 

2740. District Use Regulations 

2741 . The Flood Plain District shall be considered 
as overlying other Districts. Any uses 
permitted in the portions of the Districts so 
overlaid shall be permitted subject to all 
of the provisions of this Section. 

2742. In the Flood Plain District no new building 



50 



shall be erected or constructed, and no 
existing structure shall be altered, enlarged 
or moved;; no dumping, filling, or earth 
transfer or relocation shall be permitted; 
nor any land, building, or structure used 
for any purposes except: 

(a) Conservation of water, plants, and 
wildlife. 

(b) Outdoor recreation, including play 
areas, nature study, boating, fishing and 
hunting, where otherwise legally permitted, 
but excluding buildings and structures. 

(c) Non-commercial signs (as permitted in 
the residential districts), wildlife manage- 
ment areas, foot, bicycle, and/or horse 
paths and bridges, provided that such uses 
do not affect the natural flow pattern on 
watercourse. 

(d) Grazing and farming, including truck 
gardening and harvesting of crops. 

(e) Forestry and nurseries. 

2743. The portion of any lot within the area 
delineated in Subsection 2730 above may 
be used to meet the area and yard 
requirements for the District or Districts 
in which the remainder of the lot is situated. 

2750. Exceptions. In the Flood Plain District, 
the Board of Appeals may grant a special permit 
for exception for uses or structures in addition to 
those allowed under Section 2740, subject to the 
following: 

2751. The request has been referred by the 
applicant to the Planning Board, the 
Board of Health, and the Conservation 
Commission for review and recommendation 
as provided in Section 1 1 , Ch. 40 A, G.L. 

2752. The land is shown to be neither subject to 
flooding nor unsuitable for the proposed 
use because of hydrologic and/or topo- 
graphic conditions; 

2753. The proposed use will not be detrimental 
to the public health, safety, and welfare; 
and 



2754. The proposed use will comply in all respects 
to the provisions of the underlying District 
or Districts within which the land is located. 



ARTICLE III. GENERAL REGULATIONS 
3100. Off-Street Parking and Loading 

3110. Parking Requirements 

3111. Adequate off-street parking must be pro- 
vided to service all parking demand created 
by new structures, additions to existing 
structures, or changes of use. Existing 
buildings and uses need not comply unless 
expanded or otherwise changed to increase 
their parking needs. 

3112. In applying for building or occupancy 
permits, the applicant must demonstrate 
that the minimum parking requirements 
set forth below will be met for the new 
demand without counting existing parking 
necessary for existing uses to meet these 
requirements. 

3113. These requirements may be reduced on 
Special Permit by the Planning Board if 
it finds that fewer spaces meet all parking 
needs. Such cases might include: 

(a) Use of a common parking lot for 
separate uses having peak demands 
occurring at different times; 

(b) Age or other characteristics of 
occupants which reduce their auto usage; 

(c) Peculiarities of the use which make 
usual measures of demand invalid. 

3114. Common parking areas may be permitted 
for the purpose of serving two or more 
principal uses on the same or seperate 
lots, provided that: 

(a) Evidence is submitted that parking is 
available within 500 feet of the premises, 
which lot satisfies the requirements of this 
Bylaw and has excess capacity during all 
or part of the day, which excess capacity 
shall be demonstrated by competent parking 
survey conducted by a Traffic Engineer 
registered in the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. 

(b) A contract, agreement, or suitable 
legal instrument acceptable to Chelmsford's 
Town Counsel, shall be filed with the 
application for building permit, occupancy 
permit, or special permit for exception 
which shall specify the location of all spaces 
to be jointly used, the number of such spaces, 
the hours during the day that such parking 
shall be available, and the duration 



51 



or limit, if any on such parking. 

(c) Any reduction in area required for 
parking because of these joint use pro- 
visions shall be reserved in landscaped 
open space. Such area shall be computed 
at the rate of 400 square feet per parking 
space. 

(d) Nothing in this section shall relieve 
the owner from providing parking facilities 
in accordance with this Bylaw if sub- 
sequently the joint use of parking facilities 
shall terminate. 

3120. Number of Spaces. For the purpose of 
computing the parking requirements of different 
uses, the number of spaces required shall be the 
largest whole number obtained after increasing 
all fractions upwards to one. Employees shall 
include the largest number of owners, managers, 
full and part time workers, and volunteers that 
may be normally expected on the premises during 
any single shift or portion thereof. The number of 
seats in benches, pews, or other continuous seating 
arrangements shall be calculated at twenty inches 
for each seat. The following minimum parking 
requirements shall apply to uses as listed below. 

Stores, Retail Business, and Services. One space 
per 200 square feet of gross leasable floor 
area or a minimum of at least three spaces 
per establishment. 

Banks, Libraries, and Post Offices. One space per 
100 square feet of Floor area developed to 
public use, plus one space per employee. 

Bowling Alleys. Four spaces for each alley. 

Business and Professional Offices, Office Buildings, 
and Office of a Wholesale Establishment 
including Sales Space. One space per 200 
square feet of gross floor area. 

Medical and Dental Offices and Clinics. One space 
per 200 square feet of gross floor area. 

Restaurants, Lounges, and Function Rooms. One 
space per three seats based on the legal 
seating capacity of the facility. 

Fast Food Establishment. One space per 50 square 
feet of gross floor area. 

Theater, Funeral Home, and Places of Assembly. 
One space for each four seats or for each 50 
square feet of assembly area. 

Hotels. Motels, Tourist Homes. One space per 
guest room, plus one space per employee, 
plus a number of spaces as required 
elsewhere herein for restaurants, assembly 
halls, function rooms, shops and similiar 
functions if occurring on the premises. 

Non-family Accommodation. One space per two 



persons accommodated. 

Nursing and Convalescent Hoimes. One space for 
each three beds, plus one space for each 
employee serving on the shift having the 
greatest number of employees, plus one 
space for each visiting staff. 

Clubs, Lodges and Association Buildings. One 
space per three memberships. 

Lumber and Building Material Yards, Nurseries, 
and Outdoor Sales. One space per 150 
square feet of office and indoor sales area 
and/or one space per 1,000 square feet of 
outdoor sales area. 

Manufacturing, Truck Terminals, Wholesale 
Establishments, Public Utility Buildings 
other than their Business Offices, Ware- 
houses and similar uses not normally visited 
by the general public. One space per 1.4 
employees plus one space for each vehicle 
used in the operation. 

Any Other Non-Residential Use, Or Any Use 
Involving A Combination of Functions 
Similar To or Listed Herein. A number of 
spaces as determined by the Inspector of 
Buildings by application of the ratios above. 

Single Family, Two Family, and Multi-Family 
Dwelling. Two spaces per dwelling unit 
for units with two or more bedrooms, one 
space per dwelling unit for others. 

Home Occupations. In additions to the spaces 
required for the dwelling, one space per 
non-resident employee, plus a member of 
spaces sufficient to satisfy the requirement 
of Sec. 3111. 

3130. Off-Street Loading. All buildings 
requiring the delivery of goods, supplies, or 
materials, or shipment of the same, shall have 
bays and suitable maneuvering space for off-street 
loading of vehicles in accordance with the 
following: 

3131. Retail Stores and Services. For each es- 
tablishment with a gross floor area from 
5,000 to 8,000 square feet, at least one 
berth. Additional space is required at the 
rate of one berth per 8,000 square feet or 
nearest multiple thereof. Where two or 
more such establishments are connected 
by a common wall such as in a shopping 
center, common berths may be per- 
mitted for the use of all establishments 
at the rate of one berth space per 8,000 

square feet in the entire shopping center. 

3123. Office Buildings. For each office building 
with gross floor area of 4,000 square feet 



52 



or more, at least one berth shall be 
provided. 

3133. Manufacturing, Industrial Warehousing. 
For manufacturing, industrial and 
warehousing and similar uses up to 8,000 
square feet of gross floor area, at least one 
berth shall be provided. For larger floor 
areas, additional berths shall be provided 
as required by the Inspector of Buildings 
adequate for off-street loading and un- 
loading. 

3140. Parking and Loading Area Design and 
Location 

3141. No off-street parking area shall be located 
within 15 feet of a street right-of-way, or 
in any required yard adjacent to a 
residential or institutional use. 

3142. Parking spaces more than 500 feet from the 
building entrance they serve may not be 
counted towards fulfillment of parking 
requirements unless the Planning Board 
determines that circumstances justify this 
greater seperation of parking from use. 

3143. All required parking areas except those 
serving single-family residences shall be 
paved, unless exempted on Special Permit 
from the Planning Board for cases such 
as seasonal or periodic use where unpaved 
surfaces will not cause dust, erosion, 
hazard, or unsightly conditions. 

3144. Parking areas for 5 or more cars shall not 
require vehicles to back onto a public way. 
The following shall apply to entrances or 
exits to all parking areas having 20 or more 
spaces: 

(a) Entrance or exit centerlines shall not 
fall within 50 feet of an intersection of 
street sidelines or within 150 feet of the 
centerline of any other parking area 
entrance or exit on the same side of the 
street, whether on the same parcel or not, 
if serving 20 or more spaces. Uses shall 
arrange for shared egress if necessary to 
meet these requirements. 

(b) Egressing vehicles shall have 400 feet 
visibility in each travel direction. 

(c) Such parking lots shall contain or be 
bordered within 5' by at least one tree per 
10 parking spaces, trees to be of 2" 
caliper or larger, with not less than 40 
square feet of unpaved soil area per tree. 
Trees and soil plots shall be located 



so as to assure safe internal circulation 
and to provide visual screening from streets 
and residential areas. 

(d) Street entrances shall be designed 
consistant with Massachusetts DPW Traffic 
Regulations, Section 10A-9 or subsequent 
revisions. 

(e) Continuous curbing shall be provided 
to control access and damage, and wheel 
stops shall be provided for all other parking 
areas of five or more vehicles. 

3145. Loading areas and parking areas for 10 or 
more cars shall provide screening in 
accordance with Section 3400. 

3200. Environmental Protection Standards 

3210. Compliance. No activity shall be permitted 
in any district unless it shall be in conformity with 
the standards for environmental protection in- 
cluded herein. The Inspector of Buildings may 
require an applicant for a building or occupancy 
permit to supply, at his expense, such technical 
evidence as is necessary in support of the 
application, and may, in connection therewith, 
and at the applicant's expense, obtain expert 
advice as necessary to review the plans and 
proposals of the applicant. Payment for such 
expert advice to the Inspector of Buildings shall 
be made, or guaranteed by bond or by other 
legally binding device, before further consideration 
of the application shall continue. After a permit is 
issued in accordance with this Section, continuing 
compliance is required. When the Inspector of 
Buildings suspects a subsequent violation he may, 
as necessary, obtain expert advice, which if the 
violation is established, shall be paid for by the 
violator, otherwise, by the Town. 

3220. Water Quality. No discharge at any point 
into any public sewer, private sewerage disposal 
system, stream, water body, or into the ground, 
of any materials of such nature or temperature 
as can contaminate such water body or water 
supply, or cause emission of dangerous or offensive 
elements in reaction thereto, shall be permitted 
except in accordance with applicable federal, 
state, and local health and water pollution 
control laws and regulations. 

3230. Air Quality. No building or occupancy 
permit shall be issued for any facility specified 
in regulation 2.3 Regulations As Amended For 
the Control of Air Pollution in the Merrimack 
Valley Air Pollution District, Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, Department of Public Health, 
Bureau of Air Quality Control, until written 



53 



approval for the facility has been obtained from 
the Department of Public Health. The provisions 
of said Regulations shall apply to dust, flash, 
gas, fume, mist, odor, smoke, vapor, pollen, 
microorganism, radioactive material, radiation, 
heat, sound, any combination thereof, or any 
decay or reaction product thereof in the ambient 
air space. 

3240. Noise. No use shall be permitted within the 
Town of Chelmsford which, by reason of excessive 
noise generated there from, would cause nuisance 
or hazard to persons or property. Exempt from 
the provisions of this subsection are (a) vehicles 
not controlled by an owner or occupant of a lot 
within the Town, (b) temporary construction 
activities occurring during the hours of 7 a.m. 
to 6 p.m. on weekdays, (c) Occasionally used 
safety signals, warning devices, emergency pressure 
relief valves, or other such temporary activity, 
(d) use of power tools and equipment such as 
lawn mowers, snow-blowers, chain saws, tractors, 
and similar equipment for the maintenance of 
property. For the purposes of the Bylaw the 
standards in the following Table shall apply: 

3241. Noise Standards: Table I 

For Sounds Generated Max. Permitted 

Continuously From Any Source Sound Levels 

Not Otherwise Exempted Above, (in DBA)* 
and Measured: 

(a) At the lot line of an adjacent or nearby 
residence or institutional use, weekdays during 
the hours of 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. 60 

(b) At the lot line of an adjacent or nearby 
residence or institutional use, Sundays or during 
the hours of 6 p . m . to 7 a . m . weekdays 50 

(c) At the lot line of an adjacent Business 
Use 65 

(d) At the lot line of an adjacent Industrial 
Industrial Use 70 

*dBA shall mean the A-weighted sound pressure 
levels in decibels, as measured by a General 
Purpose Sound Level Meter complying with the 
provision of "American National Standards 
Institute. The instrument shall be properly 
calibrated and set in the A-weighted response 
scale, and the meter set to the slow response. 
Reference pressure shall be 0.0002 microbars. 

3242. Exceptions For Intermittent Noise. The 
levels (dBA) specified in Table I may be 
exceeded by 10 dBA, weekdays during 
the hours of 7 a.m. to 6 p.m., but not 
at any other time, for a period not to 



exceed twenty minutes during any one day. 

3243. Impact Noise. Impact Noise such as from a 
punch press, drop forge hammer, or 
similar equipment, shall be measured using 
the fast response of the Sound Level Meter, 
and shall not exceed the levels specified 
in Table I by more than 10 dBA. 

3250. Other Requirements 

3251. No vibration, odor, glare, or flashing shall 
be detectable without instruments at any 
lot line of a residence or an institutional 



3252. Cinders, dust, fumes, gases, odors, smoke, 
radiation, refuse or other waste materials 
shall be effectively confined to the premises 
and treated or disposed of in accordance 
with state, federal, and Town laws and 
regulations. 

3253. No process shall be used which creates 
visual or audible interference in any radio 
or television receivers off the premises or 
causes fluctuations in excess of ten percent 
in line voltage off the premises. 

3254. All activities involving, and all storage of, 
inflammable and explosive materials shall 
be provided with adequate safety devices 
against hazards from fire and explosion, 
and with adequate fire fighting and fire 
supression equipment standard in this 
industry. Burning of waste materials in the 
open, contrary to state law is prohibited. 

3255. All materials which may be edible by or 
attractive to rodents or insects shall, when 
stored in or outdoors, be stored in tightly 
closed containers. 

3300. Signs and Outdoor Lighting 

3310. General Regulations 

3311. Permits. No sign shall be erected, enlarged, 
or structurally altered without a sign 
permit issued by the Building Inspector, 
with the exception of unlighted signs one 
square foot or smaller and temporary real 
estate signs. Permits shall only be issued for 
signs in conformance with this Bylaw. 
Permit applications shall be accompanied 
by two prints of scale drawings of the sign, 
supporting structure, and location. A copy 
of any relevant Special Permit shall also 
accompany the application. All free- 
standing signs shall be registered and 



54 



identified as required by Section 1407.0 
of the State Building Code. 

3312. Maintenance. All signs shall be maintained 
in a safe and neat condition to the 
satisfaction of the Building Inspector and 
in accordance with Sections 1404.0 and 
1405.0 of the State Building Code. 

3313. Nonconformancy. Any nonconforming sign 
legally erected prior to the adoption of this 
provision, or any amendment hereto, may 
be continued and maintained, except that 
no off-premises signs (Sec. 3314g) may be 
maintained after June 1, 1980. Any sign 
rendered nonconforming through erection 
of additional signs on the premises or 
through change or termination of activities 
on the premises shall be removed within 
thirty days of order by the Building 
Inspector. No existing sign shall be 
enlarged, reworded, redesigned, or altered 
in any way except in conformity with the 
provisions contained herein. Any sign 
which has been destroyed or damaged to 
the extent that the cost of repair or 
restoration will exeed one-third of the 
replacement value as of the date of 
destruction shall not be repaired, rebuilt, 
restored, or altered unless in conformity 
with this Bylaw. 

3314. Prohibitions 

(a) No sign shall be lighted, except by 
a steady, stationary light, shielded and 
directed solely at or internal to the sign, 
resulting in sign brightness not inconsistent 
with other signs in the vicinity or the town. 

(b) No sign shall be illuminated in any 
residential district or within 300 feet of any 
residential district if within sight from it 
between the hours of 11:00 p.m. and 7:00 
a.m. unless indicating an establishment 
open to the public during those hours, 

(c) No moving, animated, revolving, 
moving light, or flashing sign or sign 
elements shall be permitted. No pennants, 
streamers, advertising flags, spinners, or 
similar devices shall be permitted. 

(d) Visibility of autos on an intersecting 
way shall not be obstructed by signs within 
twenty-five feet of any intersection. 

(e) No part of any sign shall be more than 
twenty feet in height above ground level 
unless granted a Special Permit for an 
exception by the Board of Appeals where 



such additional height is justified by need 
for visibility but will not visually intrude 
into residential districts. 

(f) Temporary signs (including those 
mounted on wheels, trailers, or motor 
vehicles if those vehicles, trailers, or 
wheeled signs are regularly located for 
fixed display) are prohibited unless 
complying with all requirements of this 
bylaw as applicable to permanent signs. 

(g) No billboard or other sign shall be 
erected or maintained unless its subject 
matter relates exclusively to the premises 
on which it is located, or to products, 
accommodations, services, or activities 
on those premises. 

3320. Signs Permitted in Residential Districts. 
RA, RB, RC, and RM, shall include: 

3321. One sign for each family residing on the 
premises indicating the owner or occupant 
or pertaining to a permitted accessory use, 
provided that no such sign shall exceed 
one square foot in area. 

3322. One sign not over nine square feet in 
area pertaining to a permitted use or 
building other than dwellings or their 
accessory uses. 

3323. One temporary unlighted sign not over six 
square feet in area pertaining to the sale, 
rent, or lease of the premises provided 
that it shall be removed within seven days 
after sale, rent, or lease thereof. 

3324. Unlighted directional signs not exceeding 
one square foot in area each and pertaining 
to permitted building, uses of the premises 
other than dwellings and their accessory 
uses, or prohibiting use of the premises or 
certain portions of it. 

3330. Signs Permitted in Business Districts, CA, 
CB, CC, and CD shall include: 

3331 . One sign mounted on the face or wall of the 
building not to exceed in area 15 percent 
of the front wall area of said building 
if occupied by a single business, or one 
sign similarly mounted for each separate 
business jointly occupying a divided 
building, each sign not to exceed 15 
percent of the front wall area of that 
section of the building occupied by any 
individual business; and provided that in 
either circumstance the sign does not 
extend above or beyond its wall or parapet. 



55 



3332. One free standing sign located within the 
front yard area of a building and not 
exceeding 15 percent of the front wall of 
the building, or 60 square feet, whichever 
is smaller, provided that the building has a 
minimum setback of 30 feet and the sign 
is so located as to be set back 15 feet 
from the street line and 20 feet from any 
side lot line. 

3333. Directional signs, each not to exceed 3 
square feet in area. 

3334. One window sign for each window of the 
building not to exceed in area 20 percent of 
the area of any window upon which located. 

3335. Temporary, freestanding pole or ground 
signs may be erected on the premises to 
identify any building under construction, 
its owner, architect, builder or others 
associated with it, provided that such sign 
shall not exceed sixty square feet in area 
and shall not be erected to interfere with 
sight lines along the public way. Such sign 
shall be removed within seven days of the 
issuance of an occupancy permit. 

3336. Temporary freestanding ground or 
pole sign or sign attached to the front 
wall of the building and pertaining to the 
sale, rental, or lease of the premises. Such 
sign shall be removed within seven days of 
the sale, rental, or lease of said premises. 

3340. Signs Permitted in Industrial Districts, IA 
and IS. Any sign permitted in a business district 
excepting window signs and provided that any 
freestanding sign shall be permitted only where 
the building has a minimum setback of fifty feet 
and the sign is set back a minimum of twenty 
feet from the street line and thirty feet from 
side lot lines. 

3350. Outdoor Lighting. Outdoor lighting devices 
shall employ only steady stationary light of 
reasonable intensity and shall be shielded or 
placed in such way as to not cast a direct 
beam on a public way, pedestrian way, or an 
adjacent property or cause a glare or reflection 
that may constitute a traffic hazard or nuisance. 

3400. Grading and Screening 



3410. Grading. 

3411. Slopes of 15% or greater which will result 
from grading, construction, or other land 
alteration shall be stabilized either through 
a structural retaining wall or cribbing, or 



through vegetative slope stabilization; 
comprising not less than 4" of topsoil 
planted densely with plants having shallow 
fibrous roots sufficient to retain the soil, 
such as grasses, legumes, dogwood, amur 
privet, rugosa rose, and bayberry. 

3412. Lots having average finish grades in excess 
of 10% shall either retain existing 
vegetaion, or provide vegetative slope 
stabilization as above, on a percentage of 
of lot area equal to not less than twice 
the average percentage slope. 

3420. Screening 

3421. The following shall be screened from any 
adjacent residential district or use from 
which they would otherwise be visible: 

(a) outdoor commercial recreation; 

(b) outdoor sales displays. 

3422. The following shall be screened from any 
adjacent residential district or use from 
which they would otherwise be visible, 
and also from any public way from which 
they would otherwise be visible: 

(a) contractor's yard; 

(b) open storage; 

(c) loading and service areas; 

(d) drive-in theater; 

(e) outdoor parking or storage for ten or 
more cars; 

(f) granite operations; 

(g) solid waste facility. 

3423. "Screening" in this context shall mean an 
area four feet wide densely planted and 
maintained with evergreen trees or shrubs 
three feet or more in height when planted, 
or a wall, 50% opaque fence, or earth 
berm 42" or more in height, supplemented 
with plantings, or equivalent visual 
screening by building placement, natural 
vegetation, or difference in elevation 
between potential viewers and the screened 
areas; except that lower elements shall be 
used where necessary for egress visibility. 

ARTICLE IV. SPECIAL REGULATIONS 

4100. Accessory Uses and Structures 

4110. Home Occupations. Any permitted Home 
Occupation shall comply with the following 
requirements, conditions, and guidelines: 

4111. The occupation or profession shall be 
carried on wholly within the principal 



56 



building or within a building or other 
structure accessory thereto, provided that 
no more than twenty-five (25) percent of 
the floor area of the residence is used for 
the purposes of the home occupation or 
the professional use; 

4112. Not more than one person outside the 
household shall be employed in the home 
occupation; 

4113. There shall be no exterior display, no 
exterior sign except as permitted under 
Section 3300, no exterior storage of 
materials and no other exterior indication 
of the home occupation or variation from 
the residential character of the principal 
building; 

4114. No offensive noise, vibration, smoke, dust, 
odors, heat or glare shall be produced; 

4115. Sufficient space shall be provided so that all 
parking is accommodated off-street, but 
not more than two spaces within any 
required yard, and not occupying more 
than twenty (20) percent of the lot area. 
Any such parking area of greater than two 
spaces shall be designed, located, land- 
scaped and screened as as to be unobtrusive 
to view from any public way or from any 
adjacent residential lot line; 

4116. No traffic shall be generated by the Home 
Occupation in substantially greater volumes 
than would normally be expected in a 
residential neighborhood of the type in 
which said use is located. 

4120. Swimming Pools. Any constructed pool, 
located above or below the ground, whether 
portable or fixed, used or capable of being 
used for swimming, wading, or bathing purposes 
and having a depth of at least two feet and a 
capacity of at least two hundred cubic feet in 
volume shall be subject to the following 
requirements: 

4121. Every outdoor swimming pool shall be 
completely surrounded at all times, 
whether or not filled with water, by a fence 
or wall not less than four feet in height; 
unless the pool wall itself is four feet or 
more above grade at all points. 

4122. Every such fence, wall, door or gate shall 
be constructed as not to have openings, 
holes or gaps larger than 2 inches in a 
horizontal dimension and 4 inches in the 
vertical dimension or shall be otherwise 
designed, constructed and maintained to 



be non-climable by small children. The 
wire sizes for all fences and doors fabricated 
with wire mesh shall not be less than 
No. 16 Wire. The gates or doors opening 
in the fence shall be at least of the same 
height and construction as the fence or wall 
and shall be equipped with a self-closing 
and self-latching device located at least 
four feet above the underlying ground and 
inaccessible from the outside to small 
children. Every gate or door shall be kept 
locked at all times when the swimming 
pool enclosure is not in use. 

4123. All ladders used to gain access to above 
ground pools shall be removed or placed 
so as not to allow entrance by small 
children when the pool is not in use. 
No permanent ladders may be attached to 
above ground pools on the outside unless 
the pool is surrounded by a separate fence 
as specified above. 



4130. Barn Sale, Yard Sale, Garage Sale, or Flea 
Market. The temporary use of residential, 
institutional, or industrial premises for sale of 
personal property is permitted provided that a 
temporary occupancy permits is obtained. Such 
permits shall be issued by the Inspector of 
Buildings for up to two consecutive days only, 
not more than twice each calendar year for any 
given premises. For each such sale a separate 
permit shall be required. No merchandise 
dangerous to life or limb shall be shown or 
sold and all persons conducting such sales shall 
take all necessary steps for the protection of 
persons while on their premises. 

4140. Scientific Uses. Uses, whether or not on the 
same parcel as activities permitted as a matter of 
right, accessory to activities permitted as a matter 
of right, which activities are necessary in 
connection with scientific research or scientific 
development or related production, may be 
permitted upon the issuance of a Special Permit 
by the Board of Appeals provided the granting 
authority finds that the proposed accessory use 
does not substantially derogate from the public 
good as evidenced by consistency with the criteria 
of Section 1520. 

4150. Roadside Stands. Roadside stands shall be 
located at least 15 feet back from any street 
right-of-way and 20 feet from any lot line. 
Portable stands shall be removed during seasons 
when not in use. 

4160. Animals Accessory to Dwellings. Cattle, 
horses, sheep, hogs, goats, or similar livestock 
shall be maintained accessory to a dwelling only 



57 



on a lot having an area of not less than 40,000 
square feet plus 15,000 square feet per large 
animal (25 pounds or heavier at maturity) in 
excess of one or per ten smaller animals in excess 
of the first ton. Such animals and their wastes shall 
be contained at least 50 feet from any abutting lot 
line of a residentially used lot, and at least 50 feet 
from any year-round surface water body. 
4170. Unregistered Motor Vehicles. No person 
shall permit more than two unregistered motor 
vehicles or trailers or major parts thereof, except 
for farm vehicles, to remain ungaraged on his 
premises at any time unless under a Class 1 or 
Class 2 Licenses for salr of motor vehicles (Sec. 57- 
69, Ch. 140. 

4200. Earth Removal and Landfill 



4210. General. No operations for the removal of 
sod, loam, peat, humus, clay, sand, or gravel, and 
no land fill operations shall be permitted except in 
accordance with the conditions and procedures 
contained herein. The provisions of this Section 
shall not apply to removal or filling incidental to 
the construction of a building at the site of 
removal or filling, for which a building permit has 
been issued which is not more than six months old, 
or for grading or otherwise improving the premises 
around the building, provided that any fill 
material imported to the site shall be inorganic 
material and further provided that any such 
earthwork, final grades, planting and landscaping 
is conducted with due regard for the protection 
of persons and property adjacent to the site. The 
provisions of this Section shall not apply to any 
Townoperated or Town maintained land fill. 

4220. Special Permit for Exception. The Board 
of Appeals may, by special permit for exception, 
permit earth removal or land fill operations but 
only in accordance with the procedural require- 
ments for such permits contained in the Zoning 
Act and Section 1500 of this Bylaw, and further 
subject to the following conditions: 

4221. Application. Each application for earth 
removal or land fill shall be accompanied 
by a plan of land, at least six 8'xlO" 
photographs of the area, and a statement 
describing the fill material to be used and 
where such fill would be obtained. The 
plan of land shall indicate existing grade, 
proposed area of fill, proposed area of cut, 
area to be left as natural ground, grades 
below which no removal is to take place, 
proposed final landscaping, and bench 
marks. A final plan of land shall be 
prepared showing the final grades, cross 
sections, location of culverts and other site 



improvements, and cover vegetaion, trees 
and landscaping. Both plans of land shall 
be prepared by a registered civil engineer 
and surveyor, except that the Board of 
Appeals may waive these requirements, 
upon written request, where it is evident 
that the applicant's plan is sufficiently 
accurate for the scope of operations and 
where such operations will be minor. The 
initial plan of land shall be prepared in 
five copies and, at the time of application 
to the Board of Appeals, shall be dis- 
tributed to the Inspector of Buildings, 
Town Engineer, Planning Board, and 
Conservation Commission who may make a 
report with recommendations to the Board 
of Appeals either at or prior to the hearing 
on the application. The final plan of land 
shall be prepared in at least three copies, 
one of which shall be distributed to the 
Inspector of Buildings and one to the Town 
Engineer who shall review the final plan 
and completed site for conformity with this 
Bylaw and any terms and conditions 
imposed by the Board of Appeals. 

4222. A performance bond in an amount 
determined by the Board of Appeals shall 
be posted in the name of the Town assuring 
satisfactory compliance with this Bylaw and 
any conditions imposed by the Board of 
Appeals in the interests of saft-guarding the 
area and the Town against injury, assuring 
proper future use of the land after 
operations are completed, or to control the 
transportation of such material through the 
Town. Upon failure to comply and 
forfeiture of the bond, monies there from 
shall be utilized by the Town for the 
purpose of fulfilling these requirements. 

4223. Before granting a special permit for 
removal or filling, the Board of Appeals 
shall give due consideration to the location 
of the proposed operation, to the general 
character of the neighborhood surrounding 
such location, to the existing topography 
and natural landscape, drainage patterns, 
ground cover and vegetaion, and to the 
general safety of the public on the public 
ways and in the vicinity of the removal or 
land fill operations. 

4224. The Board of Appeals may set additional 
conditions governing the conduct of opera- 
tions, hours when trucking is permitted, 
trees, screening, and landscaping which 
shall be in writing and a part of the permit 
issued. No permit shall be issued for more 



58 



than one year, and may be renewed only 
upon application and following a public 
hearing. Prior to renewal, inspection of the 
premises shall be made by the Inspector of 
Buildings. The Board of Appeals, after 
hearing and proof of violation of the terms 
of the permit or of this Bylaw shall withdraw 
the permit, after which the operation shall 
be discontinued, and the area restored in 
accordance with Section 4240 of this Bylaw 

4225. The Inspector of Buildings is authorized 
to make periodic inspections of any earth 
removal or land fill site and promptly 
make reports to the Board of Appeals when 
non-compliance is observed. 

4226. Bond shall not be released until sufficient 
time has lapsed to ascertain that any filled 
area has stabilized, that vegetaion planted 
has successfully been established, and the 
drainage is satisfactory. 

4230. Earth Removal. Removal operations shall 
comply with the following standards: 

4231. Removal shall not take place below a level 
that would reasonably be considered a 
desirable grade for the later development 
of the area, or below the grades specified 
on the plan accompanying the permit, 
provided such plan has been approved or 
modified in accord with the directive of the 
Board of Appeals. 

4332. During removal operations, no slope shall 
exceed one foot rise to one and one half 
feet horizontal distance or the natural 
angle of repose of the material in a dry 
state, whichever is lower, except in ledge 
rock. 

4233. Provisions shall be made for safe drainage 
of water, and for preventing wind or water 
erosion carrying material onto adjoining 
properties. 

4234. Soil shall not be disturbed within 100 feet 
of the boundaries of the premises, excepting 
at the conclusion of operations, if required 
in order to improve the overall grading. 

4240. Restoration. Forthwith following the expira- 
tion or withdrawal of a permit or upon voluntary 
cessation of operations, or upon completion of 
removal in a substantial area, that entire area 
shall be restored as follows: 

4241. All land shall be graded so that the 
elevation of any disturbed areas shall be 
one foot or more above the grade level 



of any adjacent street or way and so that 
no slope exceeds a rise of one foot 
vertical for each three feet of horizontal 
distance, and shall be graded as to safely 
provide for drainage without erosion. 

4242. All boulders larger than one half cubic yard 
shall be removed or buried. 

4243. The entire area of disturbed ground shall 
be covered with not less than four inches 
of loam, which shall be planted with cover 
vegetation adequate to prevent soil erosion, 
using either grasses or ground cover, 
depending upon conditions. 

4250. Land Fill. Land fill operations shall comply 
with the following standards: 

4251. Material. Only inorganic matter lending 
itself to high density packing may be used 
for landfill operations. 

4252. Grade. All land fill operations when 
completed shall not be more than one foot 
above grade level any adjacent street or way 
adjoining properties. 

4253. Slope and Drainage. All land fill operations 
when completed shall be so graded that no 
slope exceeds one foot rise to three feet 
horizontal distance and shall be graded so 
as to safely provide for drainage without 
erosion. 

4254. Loam. All land fill operations, when 
completed shall be covered with at least 
four inches of loam, landscaped and 
seeded (or hot-topped if the prior written 
approval of the Board of Appeals is 
obtained). 

4255. Retaining Walls. Where it is necessary to 
erect retaining walls to guard against 
erosion, such retaining walls shall be no 
more than eighteen inches above the grade 
of all adjacent streets or ways with the 
filled land at least eight inches below the 
top of the retaining wall. 

4300. Fairs, Carnivals and Similar Events 

Special permits for carnivals, fairs, exhibits, 
or similar outdoor events may be granted only 
consistent with the following: 

4310. Sponsorship. The sponsor shall be a religious, 
charitable, social or public organization. 

4320. Duration. The event shall continue no 
longer than one week at any one time, and not 
more than two such events shall be authorized 



59 



within any 12 months for any one sponsor. 

4330. Other Requirements. All requirements of 
this bylaw, except paving for parking areas but 
including Section 3200, Environmental Protection 
Standards, and Section 3350, Outdoor Lighting, 
shall be observed. 



ARTICLE V. DEFINITIONS 

In this Bylaw, the following terms and constructions 
shall apply unless a contrary meaning is required by the 
context or is specifically prescribed in the text of the 
Bylaw. Words used in the present tense include the 
future. The singular includes the plural and the plural 
includes the singular. The word "shall" is mandatory and 
"may" is permissive or discretionary. The word "and" 
includes "or" unless the contrary is evident from the text. 
The word "includes" or "including" shall not limit a term 
to specified examples, but is intended to extend its 
meaning to all other instances, circumstances, or items of 
like character or kind. The word "lot" includes "plot"; 
the word "used" or "occupied" shall be considered as 
though followed by the words "or intended, arranged, or 
designed to be used or occupied". The words "building", 
"structure", "lot", or "parcel", shall be construed as 
being followed by the words "or any portion thereof. 
The word "person" includes a firm, association, 
organization, partnership, company, or corporation, as 
well as an individual. Terms and words not defined 
herein but defined in the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts State Building Code shall have the 
meaning given therein unless a contrary intention is 
clearly evident in the Bylaw. 

ASSESSORY BUILDING. A subordinate building 
located on the same lot as the main, or principal 
building or principal use, the use of which is 
customarily incidental to that of the principal building 
or use of the land. 

ACCESSORY USE. A use customarily incidental to that 
of the main or principal building or use of the land. 

ALTERATIONS. As applied to a building or structure, 
a change or rearrangement in the structural parts or 
in the exit facilities, or an enlargement whether by 
extending on a side or by increasing in height, or 
the moving from one location or position to another. 

ANIMAL KENNEL OR HOSPITAL. Permises used for 
the harboring and/or care of more than three dogs or 
other domestic, non-farm animals (three months old 
or over). Use shall be so classified regardless of the 
purpose for which the animals are maintained, 
vvhether fees are charged or not, and whether the use 
is a principal or accessory one. 

BARN SALE, GARAGE SALE OR YARD SALE. Any 
sale of personal property conducted by the owner or 



the immediate members of his family at his or their 
own residence. 

BOATHOUSE, PRIVATE. Facility for storage of boats 
for private use and not for hire. 

BOATHOUSE, PUBLIC. A structure for the storage of 
boats for remuneration or hire, for boat sales, fuel 
sales, and boat repairs. 

BUILDING. A structure enclosed within exterior walls 
or firewalls, built, erected, and framed of a combination 
of any materials, whether portable or fixed, having 
a roof, to form a structure for the shelter of persons, 
animals, or property. For the purpose of this definition, 
"roof shall include an awning or any similar covering, 
whether or not permanent in nature. 



BUILDING COVERAGE. That percentage of the lot or 
plot area covered by the roof area or a building or 
buildings. 

BUILDING HEIGHT. The vertical distance from the 
grade to the highest point of the roof. When a 
building faces more than one street, the height shall 
be measured from the average of the grade at the 
center line of each street front. Not included are 
spires, cupolas, antennae, or similar parts of structures 
which do not enclose potentially habitable floor space. 

BUILDING PRINCIPAL. A building in which is 
conducted the main of principal use of the lot on which 
said building is situated. 

BUSINESS OR PROFESSIONAL OFFICE. A building 
or part thereof, for the transaction of business or the 
provision of services exclusive of the receipt, sale, 
storage, or processing of merchandise. 

CLUB OR LODGE. Buildings, structures and premises 
used by a non-profit social or civic organization, or by 
an organization catering exclusively to members and 
their guests for social, civic, recreational, or athletic 
purposes which are not conducted primarily for gain 
and provided there are no vending stands, merchandi- 
sing, or commercial activities except as may be 
required generally for the membership and purposes 
of such organization. 

CONTRACTOR'S YARD. Premises used by a building 
contractor or sub-contractor for storage of equipment 
and supplies, fabrication of sub-assemblies, and 
parking of wheeled equipment. 

DWELLING. A building designed and occupied as the 
living quarters of one or more families. Single and Two 
Family Dwellings shall be designed for and occupied 
by not more than one or two families, respectively. 
A Multi-Family Dwelling shall be one designed for and 
occupied by three or more families. 



60 



EARTH REMOVAL. Extraction of sand, gravel, top 
soil, or other earth for sale or for use at a site removed 
from the place of extraction exclusive of the grading 
of a lot preparatory to the construction of a building 
for which a building permit has been issued, or the 
grading of streets in accordance with an approved 
Definitive Plan, and exclusive of granite operations. 

EDUCATIONAL PURPOSE, EXEMPT BY STATUTE. 
Educational purposes exempted from prohibition, 
regulation, or restriction as provided in Section 3, 
Chapter 40A, G.L. 

ERECT. To build, construct, reconstruct, move upon, 
or conduct any physical development of the premises 
required for a building; to excavate, fill, drain, 
and the like preparation for building shall also be 
considered to erect. 

FAMILY. Any number of individuals living and cooking 
together on the premises as a single housekeeping unit. 

FARM. Any parcel of land containing at least vie five 
acres which is used for gain in the raising of agri- 
cultural products, livestock, poultry and dairy 
products. It includes necessary farm structures within 
the prescribed limits and the storage of equipment 
used. It excludes the raising of fur bearing animals, 
hogs, riding academies, livery or boarding stables and 
dog kennels. 

FAST FOOD ESTABLISHMENT. Premises used for the 
sale of on- premises prepared food and drink for off- 
premises consumption or for on-premises consumption 
if, as sold, such food or drink is ready for take-out; 
unless such use is wholly incidental to another use 
defined in this Bylaw (e.g. "Restaurant"). 

FUNERAL HOME. FAcility for the conducting of 
funerals and related activities such as embalming. 

GRANITE OPERATIONS. The removal and processing 
of granite for construction use, not including stone 
crushing. 

HOME OCCUPATION. An occupation, business, trade, 
servcie or profession which is incidental to and 
conducted in a dwelling unit or in a building or 
other structure accessory thereto, by a resident thereof. 

JUNK. Any article or material or collection thereof 
which is worn out, cast off or discarded and which is 
ready for destruction or has been collected or stored 
for salvage or conversion. Any article or material 
which, unaltered or unchanged and without further 
reconditioning can be used for its original purpose 
as readily as when new shall not be considered junk. 

JUNK YARD. The use of any area of any lot, whether 
inside or outside of a building for the storage, 
keeping, or abandonment of junk, or scrap or 



discarded materials, or the desmantling, demolition, 
or abandonment of automobiles, or other vehicles, or 
machinery or parts thereof. The keeping of such 
articles including unregistered, inoperative motor 
vehicles, shall constitute a junk yard regardless of the 
length of time that any one or more such articles 
remain on the premises. 

LIGHT INDUSTRY. Fabrication, assembly, processing, 
finishing work or pacakaging in such a manner that 
regulations of Section 3200 are conformed to. 

LOT. A continuous parcel of land with legally definable 
boundaries. 

LOT CORNER. A lot with two adjacent sides abutting 
upon streets or other public spaces. 

LOT, DEPTH OF. The mean distance from the street 
line of the lot to its opposite rear line measured in the 
general direction of the side lines of the lot. 

LOT, FRONTAGE OF. That portion of a lot fronting 
upon and providing rights of access to a street, to 
be measured coninuously along a single street or along 
two intersecting streets if their angle of intersection 
is greater than 120 degrees. 

LOT LINE. A line dividing one lot from another, or 
from a street or any public place. 

LOT, WIDTH OF. The horizontal distance between 
side lot lines, measured parallel to the lot frontage 
at the front yard setback line. 

MOBILE HOME. A dwelling built on a chassis, 
containing complete electrical, plumbing and sanitary 
facilities, and designed without necessity of a 
permanent foundation for year round living, ir- 
respective of whether actually attached to a foundation 
or other wise permanently located. 

MOTEL OR HOTEL. A building or group of buildings 
providing accomodations for compensation on a 
transient basis, but not meeting the definition of "non- 
family accommodations". Accommodations individu- 
ally having a stove and either or both a refrigerator 
and sink shall be considered dwelling units. 

MOTOR VEHICLE GENERAL REPAIRS. Premises 
for the servicing and repair of autos, but not to 
include fuel sales. 

MOTOR VEHICLE LIGHT SERVICE. Premises for the 
the supplying of fuel, oil, lubrication, washing, or 
minor repair services, but not to include body work, 
painting, or major repairs. 

NON-FAMILY ACCOMMODATIONS. Boarding houses, 
lodging houses, guest houses, tourist homes, dormi- 
tories, half-way houses, or similar accommodations. 



61 



Accommodations shall be considered hotels or motels 
if having a sign in excess of two square feet or 
other departure from residential character; or, if 
having specified term of residence less than one week. 
Accommodations individually having a stove and 
either or both a refrigerator and a sink shall be 
considered dwelling units. 

NURSERY SCHOOL. A school designed to provide 
daytime care or instruction for two or more children 
from two to five years of age inclusive and operated 
on a regular basis. 

NURSING OR CONVALESCENT HOME. Any building 
with sleeping rooms where persons are housed or 
lodged and furnished with meals and nursing care for 
hire. 

OPEN SPACE, LANDSCAPED. That part or parts of 
a lot designed and developed with trees, plants, 
shrubs, flowers, grass, groundeover, and other 
landscape features, including natural features of the 
site, walks, terraces, and open areas otherwise free 
of any structures or pavement. Such landscaped open 
space as is provided shall be maintained by the owner 
throughout the duration of his or her tenure. 

OUTDOOR COMMERCIAL RECREATION. Drive in 
theater, golf driving range, mainiature golf, race 
track, amusement park, professional sports stadium, 
or similar commercial recreation conducted in whole 
or in part outdoors. The term shall not include 
exhibits, fairs, carnivals, or similar events conducted 
by, for the benefit of, or under the auspices of 
clubs, religious organizations, institutions, or similar 
non-profit or public organizations under 
a temporary use permit issued by the Inspector of 
Builings. 

RESTAURANT. A building, or portion thereof, con- 
taining tables and/or booths for at least two-thirds 
of its legal capacity, which is designed, intended and 
used for the indoor sales and consumption of food 
prepared on the premises, except that food may be 
consumed outdoors in landscapted terraces, designed 
for dining purposes, which are adjuncts to the main 
indoor restaurant facility. The term "restaurant" 
shall not include "fast food establishments". 



RIDING/ACADEMY OR PUBLIC STABLE. An 
establishment where horses are kept for sale, riding, 
driving, or stabling, for compensation or incidental to 
the operation of a club, association, or similar 
establishment. 

ROADSIDE STAND. A structure of a semi-permanent 
type or of a temporary nature, from which farm 
products the major portion of which are produced 
on the lot, are offered for sale to the public. 



SIGN. Any device desinged to inform or atract the 
attention of persons not on the premises on which the 
device is located. Any building surfaces other than 
windows which are internally illuminated or decorated 
with gaseous tube or other lights are considered 
"signs". The following, however, shall not be 
considered signs within the context of this Bylaw: 

a) flags and insignia of any government except when 
displayed in connection with commercial promotion, 

b) legal notices, or informational devices erected or 
required by public agencies, 

c) temporary devices erected for a charitable or 
religious cause, 

d) temporary displays inside windows, covering not 
more than thirty (30) per cent of window area, 
illuminated by building illumination only, 

e) standard gasoline pumps bearing thereon in usual 
size and form the name, type, and price of gasoline, 

f) integral decorative or architectural features of a 
building, except letters, trademarks, moving parts, 
or parts internally illuminated or decorated with 
gaseous tube or other lights. 

SIGN AREA. The area of the smallest horizontally or 
vertically oriented rectangle which could enclose all the 
display area of the sign, together with any backing 
different in color or material from the fininsh material 
of the building face, without deduction for open space 
or other irregularities. Structural members not bearing 
advertising matter shall not be included unless 
internally or decora tively lighted. Only one side of flat, 
back-to back signs need to included in calculating 
sign area. 

SOLID WASTER DISPOSAL FACILITY. Sanitary 
landfill, refuse transfer station, refuse incinerator with 
grate area in excess of ten (10) square feet, composting 
plant, solid waste, recycling operation, and any other 
works or use approved by the Massachusetts Depart- 
ment of Public Health and the Board of Health of 
the Town of Chelmsford for processing, handling, 
treating, and disposing of solid or liquid waste 
materials, including garbage, rubbish, junk, discarded 
bulk items, and sludges but not raw sewage, and any 
similar waste items. 

STREET. An accepted town way, or a way established 
by or maintained under County, State, or Federal 
authority, or a way established by a subdivision 
plan approved in accordance with the Subdivision 
Control Law, or a way determined by the Planning 
Board to have sufficient width, suitable grades, and 
adequate construction to provide for the needs of 
vehicular traffic in relation to the proposed use of the 
land, and for the installation of municipal services 



62 



to serve such land and the buildings erected or to be 
erected thereon. 

STRUCTURE. A combination of materials assembled at 
at a fixed location to give support or shelter, such as 
a building, framework, retaining wall, tent, reviewing 
stand, platform, bin, fence, sign, flagpole, recrea- 
tional tramway, mast for radio antenna or the like. 

TEMPORARY STRUCTURE. A portable or demount- 
able structure to be removed within twelve months. 

TRANSPORT TERMINAL. Yards or structures for the 
storage and/or servicing of two or more commercial 
vehicles or of one or more trucks over two tons. 

WAREHOUSE AND OPEN STORAGE. Storage of 
bulk goods and products whether indoors or out for 
distribution but not for sale on the premises. 

WOOD OPERATION. Forests, wood lots, portable 
wood-working mills and machinery located on the 
property for use in connection with the forest and 
wood lot operations of the owner only, with products 
stored not within 100 feet of a street line. 

YARD. A space open to the sky, located between a 
building or structure and a lot line, unoccupied except 
by fences, walls, poles, paving, and other customary 
yard accessories. 

YARD, FRONT. A yard extending the full width of the 
lot and situated between the street line and the nearest 
point of the building. 

YARD, REAR. A yard the full width of the lot and 
situated between the rear line of the lot and the nearest 
part of the main building projected to the side line of 
the lot. 

YARD, SIDE. A yard situated between the nearest point 
of the building and the side line of the lot and 
extending from the front yard to the rear yard. Any 
lot line not a rear line or a front line shall be deemed a 
side line. 

UNDER ARTICLE 50. Chairman of the Planning 
Board A. Robert Raab gave a presentation on the article, 
after Mr. Herr the Board's consultant explained the 
proposed changes. Mr. Raab: Article 50 would revise 
how multifamily development is regulated, and would 
amend the zoning map at ten locations in order to 
facilitate business development, allow for multifamily 
development, and afford environmental protection. 
Based on its studies and the testimony at its hearing on 
April 28, the Planning Baord recommends approval of 
the article, Mr. Raab then moves to amend the following: 

The following map changes to be deleted: the change 
from RB to RM On Riverneck Road. 

Motion Carried unanimously 



Section 4421 to be reworded to read as follows: 4421. 
RM Districts may be created by Town Meeting vote, but 
only if the district will contain at least five acres of land 
and contain rights of access for 250 linear feet upon one 
or more of the following: 

1 . a state-numbered highway, or 

2. a street having right-of-way width of sixty feet or 
more, or 

3. a street determined by the Planning Board to have 
current annual average daily traffic equal to 1,000 
vehicles per day or more. 

Finance Committee is in favor the motion to amend 

Motion Carried 

Shirley Boyd moves to amend the main motion by 
deleting from the proposed Zoning By-Law and Zoning 
map the proposal to rezone from RC (General Residence) 
to RB (Singles Residence) that parcel of land bounded by 
Golden Cove Road, Billerica Road, Wilson Street, 
Chelmsford Street and the N.Y.N.H. & H.R.R. Tracks, 
Mr. Geary representing Miss Boyd, spoke on the motion. 
Mr. Raab explained why the Planning Board wanted the 
change to stay RB. A discussion followed with a number 
of residents speaking against the motion, Sandra A. 
Kilburn, Chris Alexion & Joseph Gutwein. Paul Bienvenu 
spoke in favor of the motion as did Shirley Boyd, and the 
Finance Committee was also in favor of the Boyd motion. 
Timothy Hehir moves to stop debate on the motion. 

Motion Carried 

A Voice Vote was taken on the main motion as 
amended. Motion Defeated 

John Hibbard then moved to amend the article as 
follows: That the map change to IA District in area of 
Manning Road be deleted and that this area be retained 
as RB (Single Residence) Mr. Raab as Chairman 
representing the Planning Board spoke in favor as the 
change appears on the map (IA). Then Mr. Raab as a 
Planning Board Member spoke in favor to delete the IA 
and change back to RB. Motion Carried to amend. Mr. 
Brian Sullivan moves to stop debate, motion carried 
unanimously. 

A voice vote was questioned by Brian Sullivan - a hand 
count YES 286 -NO 147 

Motion Carried as amended. 

John H. Jason then moves to amend the article as 
follows: That the map change to RB District in the area 
of Canal Road be deleted and that this area be retained 
as IA (Light Industry). Mr. Raab as Chairmen 
representing the Planning Board spoke in favor again as 
the change appears on the map (RB) then as a Planning 
Board Member he spoke in favor of the amendment to 
delete RB and change back to IA. The Finance 



63 



Committee supported the motion, Motion Carried to 
amend. Mr. Arthur Riopelle moves the question. A voice 
vote left the chair in doubt-hand vote YES 339 - NO 60 
Motion carried. 

The Finance Committee recommends Article 50 as 
amended. Motion Carried. 

A vote taken on Article as amended in its entirety 
YES 388 -NO 17 

Motion Carried 



Article Fifty as amended in its entirety reads as follows: 

1. Revise Section 2600, INtensity of Use Schedule, as 
follows: 

1 . 1 Replace footnote "a", referenced to the minimum 
lot area in the RM District, with the following: 

"a. For multi-family dwellings, not less than 
80,000 square feet or 6,000 square feet per 
dwelling unit, whichever is greater." 

1.2 Under Landscape Open Space, delete the row 
headed "Min. sq. ft. per dwelling unit" in its 
intirety, and in the row headed "Min. % of lot 
area" insert "10" in the RC and RM columns. 

2. Revise Article IV Special Regulations by inserting a 
new Section 4400, to read as follows: 

4400. Multi-Family Dwellings 

4410. Objectives. The objectives for allowing controlled 
multi -family development in Chelmsford are to 
provide greater variety and choice in housing 
types, to broaden availability of housing for 
persons and families of limited income, to focus 
development at locations able to support it with 
relatively small environmental or municipal cost, 
and to protect the town's natural environment, 
existing character and development, and ability 
to provide public services. 

4420. District Creation 

4421. RM Districts may be created by town 
meeting vote, but only if the district will 
contain at least five acres of land said 
contain rights of access for 250 linear feet 
upon one or more of the following: 

1. a state-numbered highway, or 

2. a street having right-of-way width of 
sixty feet or more, or 

3. a street determined by the Planning 
Board to have current annual average 
daily traffic equal to 1,000 vehicles per 
day or more 



4422. Except as part of a comprehensive re- 
consideration of the zoning map, the 
Planning Board shall neither sponsor nor 
favorabley recommend any proposal to 
create an RM district unless it has had 
presented to it at a public hearing pre- 
liminary proposals and analyses, including 
the following: 



a. A schematic site plan of the district, 
showing general shape and location of 
structures, parking, retained vegetation, 
wetlands, and points of egress onto 
public ways. 

b. Materials indicating proposals for 
methods of water supply and sewage 
disposal; number of dwelling units, 
distinguishing single-family v. multi- 
family; a development schedule for 
dwellings and improvements; proposed 
form of tenure, whether rental, con- 
dominium, cooperative, or other; 
means, if any, of providing for design 
control; and means, if any, of providing 
assurance of long-term conformity to 
present proposals. 

c. Analysis of the consequences of the pro- 
posed development, evaluating the 
following impacts at a level of detail 
appropriate to the number of units 
proposed, and using analysis materials 
provided by the Planning Board: 

Natural environment: groundwater and 
surface water quality, groundwater 
level, stream flows, erosion and siltation, 
vegetative removal (especially unusual 
species and mature trees), and wildlife 
habitats. 

Public services: traffic safety and con- 
gestion, need for water system improve- 
ments, used for public sewerage, need 
for additional public recreation facili- 
ties, need for additional school facilities. 

Economics: municipal costs and 
revenues, local business activity, local 
jobs. 

Social environment: rate of town 
population growth, range of available 
housing choice. 

Visual environment: visibility of build- 
ings and parking, visual consistency 
with existing development in the area. 



64 



443 0. Procedures 

4431. Applicants for a Special Permit for multi- 
family dwelling shall, in addition to the 
materials required for Section 1420 Site 
Plan Review, submit a development 
phasing schedule indicating the maximum 
number of dwelling units proposed to be 
erected in each calendar year, and the 
timing of construction of any proposed 
community facilities. 

4432. The applicant shall transmit one addition- 
al copy of the materials required for 
Section 1420 Site Plan Review to each of 
the following for their review and recom- 
mendation, to be made not later than the 
public hearing: the Conservation Com- 
mission, Board of Selectmen, and Fire 
Department. 

4440. Requirements. A Special Permit shall be 
approved by the Planning Board only upon its 
determination that the requirements of Section 
1520 Special Permit Criteria, Section 1425 
Planning Board (Site Plan) Approval, and the 
following have been met. 

4441. The proposed plan is consistent with any 
submittals previously made under Section 
4420. District Creation, or in the event of 
inconsistency, satisfactory explanation has 
been submitted showing why the departure 
is necessitated by changed conditions or 
earlier error, and that the departure does 
not reduce compliance with the objectives 
for multi-family housing specified in Sec. 
4410. 

4442. Departure from the scale of single-family 
development is minimized through in- 
cluding not more than 24 dwelling units in 
a single structure, serving not more than 6 
dwelling units from a single entrance, 
limiting building length to not more than 
200 feet, having unbroken roof area of not 
more than 3,000 square feet, and having 
parking areas individually contain not 
more than 36 parking spaces and be 
separated from all other parking areas by 
at least 50 feet. 

4443. Visual separation from nearby premises is 
assured through providing yards of at least 
1.5 times building height measured from 
each lot line, which shall contain no 
parking areas, and through use of outdoor 
lighting fixtures not higher than 15 feet. 

3. Amend Section 2300. Use Regulations Schedule by 



adding the reference "(see Sec. 4400)" following the 
row heading "Multi-family Dwelling". 

4. Revise the Zoning Map as indicated on "Map 2", ( 
9:00 P.M. Public Hearing, 4/8/77) 

Selectmen Philip L. Currier moves to Adjourn the 
Annual Town Meeting until 7:30 P.M. on Monday 
May 16, 1977, at the McCarthy Jr. High. 

Motion Carried 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

May 16, 1977 

The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to 
order at 8:15 P.M. by the Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin 
who recognized the presence of a quorum. There were 
245 voters present. 

Selecman Philip L. Currier moved to withdraw the 
following articles: 29, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 53, 
54, 55, 56, and 64. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Gerald Tucke moved to take Article 52 out of order. 
The Finance Committee is against the motion. A voice 
vote left the chair in doubt the following counters were 
appointed: 



Connie Fabien 
Mark Gravell 
Barbara Ward 
Ina Greenblatt 



Charles Fairburn 

Judy Hass 

Richard Burtt 

Edward Hilliard 



The results of the hand count YES 103 - NO 106. Mr. 
Tucke withdrew his motion. 

UNDER ARTICLE 23. Mr. Gerald Silver moves that 
the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$2,000.00 for participating in a demonstration public 
works managment program. Finance Committee is in 
favor. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 24. Selectman Philip L. Currier 
moves that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
$28,1 16.00 for the purpose of purchasing six (6) new 1977 
four door sedans to be used by the Police Department, 
said purchase to be made under the supervision of the 
Board of Selectmen; and to authorize the Selectmen to 
transfer by a good and sufficient bill of sale, title to one 
(1) 1971, one (1) 1974, and one (1) 1975 and three (3) 
1976 cruisers now being used by the Police Department. 
The Finance Committee is in favor of the article. 

Motion Carried 



65 



UNDER ARTICLE 25. Selectman Philip L. Currier 
moves that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $2,100.00 to match LEA A Federal Funds, for the 
purpose of providing mutual aid programs for Police 
Department. The Finance Committee is in favor of the 
article. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 26. Selectman Philip L. Currier 
moves that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $15,000.00 to engage an outside professional 
consultant for an evaluation of the efficiency and 
performance of the Chelmsford Police Department. Sel. 
Lovering explains the article. 

Voice Vote left the Chair in doubt - hand count 
YES 119 NO 112 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 27. Selectman Philip Currier moves 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$1,800.00 to be used to join or buy into the Merrimack 
Valley Home Care Center, Inc. for the purpose of 
obtaining services for the care of the Town's older 
Americans. The Finance Committee recommends 
passage. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

UNDER ARTICLE 28. Mr. Stratos Dukakis moves that 
the Town vote to amend the agreement between the 
Towns of Chelmsford, Groton, Littleton and Westford 
creating the Nashoba Valley Technical High School 
District in accordance with Section VII, Amendments, of 
said agreement, so as to amend sub-section (D) 
Apportionment of said Capital Costs, of Section IV, 
Budget, by adding after the first paragraph of said sub- 
section (D) the following paragraph: 

"Effective July 1, 1977, and thereafter, capital costs on 
new capital expenses, as set forth in sub-section (B) of 
Section IV, shall be apportioned annually in January for 
the enusing fiscal year to the member towns on the basis 
of their respective pupil enrollments in the regional 
district schools. Each member town's share of such 
capital cost for each fiscal year shall be determined by 
computing the ratio which the Town pupil enrollment in 
the regional school district on October 1st of the year next 
preceding the year for which the apportionment is 
determined bears to the total pupil enrollment from all 
the member towns in the regional school district school 
on the same date. In computing this apportionment, the 
"persons" referred to in sub-section IV (F) shall be 
excluded, In the event that enrollment in the regional 
district school has not been accomplished by October 1st 
of any year, capital cost shall be apportioned to the 
member towns on the basis of the average enrollment in 
Grades 9 through 12 in the previous three years of pupils 
residing in eac member town and receiving education at 



town's expense on October 1st of those years. Capital 
costs incurred prior to July 1, 1977, however, shall 
continue to be apportioned in accordance with the 
provisions of the first paragraph of sub -section (D) of 
section IV. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 29. Mr. Stratos Dukakis moves to 
withdraw this article. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 30. Selectman Currier moves that 
the Town vote to direct the Board of Selectmen to request 
that the Chelmsford Recreation Commission assume 
control of Town Property known as the Sheehan property 
at the intersection of Pine Hill Road and Singlefoot Raod 
and to develop the property as a passive Community 
recreation site. Selectman Paul C. Hart asks the Town 
Meeting body not to pass the article. Finance Committee 
agrees with the Selectmen. William Dempster of the 
Recreation Commission asks for support of the article. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 31. Philip L. Currier moves that the 
Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $1.00 to 
implemtn the Master Plan of Recreation, or a portion of 
the Master Plan of Recreation developed at the direction 
of the 1975 Annual Town Meeting under Article 44 and 
to embrace the Robert's property at the intersection of 
Old Westford Road and Westford Street; the Sheehan 
property at the intersection of Pine Hill Road and 
Singlefoot Road and the property bordering the 
Merrimack River in North Chelmsford known as the 
Shelmsford Sewer Commission development site. 
Development to follow the completed Master Plan as 
presented by Frank C. Gelinas and Associates, and 
presented to the Town at a public hearing with 
motification to abutters, Town of Chelmsford, 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and the United States 
Government. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 32. Selectman Philip L. Currier 
moves that the Town vote to amend the General By-laws, 
Article VIII Waste Disposal by deleting: 

Section 3 Trash Disposal (Recycling) 

In order to implement a program of recycling in 
conjunction with regular waste collections, residents of 
every household are requested to separate glass, cans and 
newspapers from the regular waste material before 
depositing same for collection. 

°' Section 3 Trash Disposal (Recycling) 
In order to implement a program of recycling in 
conjunction with regular waste collections, residents of 



66 



every household are required to separate waste material 
in the following catagories before depositing same for 
collection: 

1 . Glass and cans 

2. Paper 

3. Other waste 

If no separation takes place, the Highway Department 
will not pick up the material and the household will be 
granted a twelve hour period to remove the material or 
suffer a fine of $15.00. The Finance Committee is in 
favor of the article. Alfter a lenghty discussion Melvin 
Dejager moves the question. Motion carried 
unanimously. 



A Vote taken by hand YES 122 
Carried. 



NO 89 Motion 



UNDER ARTICLE 33. Selectman Currier moves that 
the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
enter negotiations for the construction and placement of 
collection bins at the land fill for temporary storage of 
recycable materials. The Finance Committee 
recommends the article. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 34. Mr. J. Paul J. Gravell moves to 
amend the article. After much discussion the article is 
tabled to be the last article taken up on the Town 
Meeting Warrant. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 35. Selectman Philip L. Currier 
moves that the Town vote to Raise and appropriate the 
sum of $129,000.00 to implement the Camp, Dresser and 
McKee report dated November 8, 1976, as approved by 
the Commonwealth for a Sanitary Landfill Development. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 36. Selectman Philip L. Currier 
moves that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $500.00 to obtain appraisals of land adjacent to 
the Swain Road Landfill. Finance Committee is in favor 
of the article. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 37. Selectman Philip L. Currier 
moves that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $58,825.40 transfer from the Stabilization Fund 
the sum of $63,000.00 and transfer from the Road 
Machinery Fund the sum of $2,841.60 for the purchase of 
equipment for the Highway Department, such purchase 
to be made under the supervisions of the Board of 
Selectmen, and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
dispose of equipment presently being used by the 
Highway Department as follows: (a) To Purchase two (2) 
Dump Trucks for the Highway Department and sell by 



good and sufficient bill of sale two (2) Dump Trucks 
presently being used by the Highway Department, (b) To 
purchase two (2) truck chassis (for waste collections) for 
the Highway Department and to sell by good and 
sufficient bill of sale one (1) waste collection truck 
presently being used by the Highway Department, One 
(1) 1971 truck to be traded, (c) To Purchase two (2) 
packer bodies (for waste collections) for the Highway 
Department, (d) To purchase two (2) snow plows for the 
Highway Department, (e) To purchase two (2) sander 
bodies for the Highway Department (Hydraulic type) (f) 
To purchase one (1) sidewalk snowplow tractor for the 
Highway Department. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 38. Mr. Donald A. House, 
Chairman of the Conservation Commission moves that 
the Town vote to transfer from the Conservation Fund 
$16,000.00 for the purpose of engaging a consultant to 
delineate limits of "Wetlands" on the Town's two foot 
contour map. The Finance Committee is in favor of the 
article. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 39 Withdrawn 

UNDER ARTICLE 40 Withdrawn 

UNDER ARTICLE 41 Withdrawn 

UNDER ARTICLE 42 Withdrawn 

UNDER ARTICLE 43 Withdrawn 

UNDER ARTICLE 44 Withdrawn 

UNDER ARTICLE 45 Withdrawn 

UNDER ARTICLE 46 Withdrawn 

UNDER ARTICLE 47. Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin 
Jr. moves that the Town vote to amend the General By- 
Laws Article 2 "Town Meeting" Section 3 Town Meeting 
Rules of order by deleting the following: 



Section 2 - Quorum Requirements 

2.1 A quorum of not less than 200 registered votes eligible 
to vote on March 1 preceding the Town Meeting must be 
present at any or all Town Meetings to legally transact 
and consummate the business of the Town. 

2.2 No Special Town Meeting shall be held without a 
quorum of 300 registered voters eligible to vote on March 
1 preceding the Special Town Meeting; 

and add the following: 

Section 2 - Quorum Requirements 



2.2 A quorum of not less than 200 registered voters 
eligible to vote must be present at any or all Annual 
Town Meetings to legally transact and consummate the 
business of the Town. 

2.2 No Special Town Meeting shall be held without a 



67 



quorum of 300 registered votes eligible to vote preceding 
the Special Town Meeting. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

UNDER ARTICLE 48. Selectman Philip L. Currier 
moves that the Town vote to amend the General By-Laws 
Article VI Police Regulations, Section 9 Littering, by 
adding the following section: 

Any person causing to be delivered any advertising or 
informational material either singularly or collectively 
packaged upon any premises in the Town shall make 
known his identity and the location of his usual place of 
business or residence to each owner or occupant receiving 
said materials. Any person who does not desire to receive 
said materials may notify the distributor at this address of 
his desire not to receive said materials, Who ever, after 
receiving notification of a person's desire not to receive 
said materials or causes to be delivered any advertising or 
informational materials either singularly or collectively 
packaged upon that person's premises shall be punished 
by a fine of $50.00. Selectman Lovering explained the 
article^a-diseussign followed. 

Motion Carried 

lam Perry questioned the quorum. A Count 
was taken - 167 voters present. 200 voters are required for 
a quorum. 

Selectman Currier moves to adjourned until 7:30 P.M. 
on Thursday May 19, at the McCarthy Jr. High School. 
Meeting adjourned at 10:15 P.m. 

Motion Carried 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
May 19, 1977 

The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to 
order at 8:05 P.M. by the Moderator Danile J. Coughlin 
who recognized the presence of a quorum. There were 
217 voters present. The Following tellers were appointed: 



Mark Gravell 
David McLachlan 
Judy Adams 



Connie Fabien 

Richard Burtt 

Carl Olsson 



UNDER ARTICLE 49. Selectman Philip L. Currier 
moves that the Town vote to amend the General By-Laws 
Article VII, Miscellaneous, by adding the following: 

No person shall engage in the roadside sale of flowers, 
blankets, paintings, gifts, fish, food, rugs and trees 
without first obtaining a license issued by the Board of 
Selectmen and said license shall be conspicuously 
displayed by the vendor. The Finance Committee is in 
favor of the article. 

Motion Carried 



UNDER ARTICLE 52. Mr. Gerald C. Tucke, moves 
that the Town vote to amend the Chelmsford Zoning By- 
Law now in force and effect as follows: 

Beginning at a point 470.06 feet Northerly from the 
intersection of the Northerly line of Middlexex Street 
with the Easterly line of Kennedy Drive; thence Easterly 
at a right angle 210 feet; thence Southwesterly 320.00 feet 
to land of Hazel L. Swallow; thence Southeasterly along 
land of Swallow 113,45 feet to a point; thence 
Northeasterly along land of Vernon B. and Mabel L. 
Morris 11.51 feet to a point; thence Southeasterly along 
land of aforesaid Morris, Chaterine A. Dixon and Joseph 
H. and Mary E. Mercier 315.47 feet to a point; thence 
Easterly along land of Robert W. and Sophie A. Barnet 
and John J. 3rd and Florence McSheehy 377.46 feet to 
land of the Boston and Maine Railroad; thence 
Northwesterly in a curved line along of said railroad 1450 
feet, more or less, to a point in the Northeasterly line of 
Wotton Street; thence running Southwesterly along the 
line of Wotton Street 490 feet, more or less, to land 
formerly of DeAmbis, now of James J. and Mary H. 
Urban; thence Easterly along the last named land in two 
courses 435.00 feet, more or less, and 291.20 feet to a 
point in the Westerly line of Kennedy Drive; thence still 
Easterly, crossing Kennedy Drive 55.00 feet to the point 
of beginning, containing approximately 14 acres to be 
changed from zone IB to zone RM; 

Also a second parcel bounded and described as follows: 

Beginning at a point 260,06 feet Northerly from the 
intersection of the Northerly line of Middlesex Street with 
the Easterly line of Kennedy Drive 210 feet to a point; 
thence Easterly at a right angle 210 feet to a point; 
Thence Southwesterly 210 feet to a point; thence 
Northwesterly along land of National Construction 
Company 210 feet to the point of beginning, containing 
44,100 square feet, to be changed from zone IB to zone 
CA. Both parcels comprising 15.5 acres, more or less, 
shown on a plan of land in Chelmsford, Mass. prepared 
for Vincent P. Morton, Inc.. Scale 40 feet to an inch, 
December 23, 1969, Brooks, Jordan & Graves, 387 
Middlesex Street, Lowell, Mass. on which a public 
hearing was held at 8:00 P.M. on March 23, 1977, notice 
of which was advertised in the Chelmsford Newsweekly as 
required by law. 

Mr. A. Robert Raab, Chairman of the Planning Board 
presented the Board's recommendations of the above 
article: 

Article 52 would change from IB to RM and CD a 
15.50 acre parcel of land in North Chelmsford. The 
Planning Board held a public hearing on this on March 
23, 1977. At its meeting April 13, 1977, the Planning 
Board vote to recommend against the adoption of this 
article because it is not consistent with Planning Board 
Articles 50 and 51, and it is unclear about the access, 
which lends a puzzling aspect to the situation. This article 



68 



is not recommended by the Planning Board. 

Mr. Gerald Tucke spoke in favor of the article as did 
Mr. Barnett and Charles Higgins. Mr. Timothy Heir 
moves the question to stop debate. A voice vote left the 
chair in doubt, hand count YES 166 - NO 16. 

Motion Carried 

Vote on the Main Motion YES 158 - NO 47 % vote 
required, 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 53 Withdrawn 
UNDER ARTICLE 54 Withdrawn 
UNDER ARTICLE 55 Withdrawn 
UNDER ARTICLE 56 Withdrawn 

UNDER ARTICLE 57. Selectman Philip L. Currier 
moves that the Town vote to accept the following 
mentioned streets as laid out by the Board of Selectmen 
and shown by their reports and plans as duly filed in the 
Office of the Town Clerk: 

Ideal Avenue Extension 

Lisa Lane 

Piccadilly Circle 

Baldwin Road 

Brush Hill Road 

Providing all construction of same meets with the 
requirements of the Board of Selectmen, and subject to 
the withholding of any remaining bonds until such 
requirements have been met. The Finance Committee 
recommends the article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

UNDER ARTICLE 58. Selectman Philip L. Currier 
moves that the Town vote to disband the Library Needs 
Committee as voted at the Annual Town Meeting held on 
March 19, 1968, Article 31. Finance Committee is in 
favor of the article. 

Motion Carried 



UNDER ARTICLE 59. Selectman Philip L. Currier 
moves that the Town vote to accept the provisions of 
Chapter 45, Section 21 of Mass. General Laws to delegate 
the care and management of the Town Forest to the 
Town Conservation Commission. The Finance 
Committee is in favor of the article. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 61. Selectman Philip L. Currier 
moves that the Town vote to approve the filing of a 
petition in the General Court for an act enabling the 
Town to abolish the Sinking Fund Commission which was 
established by Article 16, Annual Town Meeting 1907, 
under Chapter 191 of the Acts of 1905. Finance 



Committee recommends the article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

UNDER ARTICLE 62. Selectman Philip L. Currier 
moves that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to convey to Ralph H. HOuse House and 
Catherine K. House all right, title and interest, if any, 
held by the Town in the following parcel of land, for 
consideration to be determined: 

Lot 31, Block 22 Assessor's Map 66, consisting of 3,300 
square feet of Land, more or less, and the buildings 
thereon, if any, located on Sixth Avenue, which was 
taken for non-payment of taxes from Alice Cunha by 
instrument recorded at the Middlesex North District 
Registry of Deeds in Book 1620, Page 83. Said land being 
described as follows: 

A certain parcel of land situated in North Chelmsford, 
in the County of Middlesex, Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, and being lots numbered 258 and 259, in 
all containing 3,300 square feet of land more or less, on 
plan of building lots at Crystal Lake Park, North 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts, dated May 1926, made by 
Brooks Jordan & Graves, C.E. revised May 1927, being 
sheet 1 , and recorded with Middlesex North District 
Registry of Deeds, July 1927 Plan Book 50, Plan 82. 

Said conveyance to be subject to restrictions contained 
in deed of Wendell A. Rosenberger recorded in said 
Registry of Deeds in Book 1253, Page 279. 

For title reference, see Treasurer's deed to the Town of 
Chelmsford, dated June 18, 1975, and recorded in said 
Registry at Book 2153, Page 301. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

UNDER ARTICLE 63. Selectman Philip L. Currier 
move that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to convey to Roger Clermont all right, title 
and interest if any, held by the Town in the Following 
parcel of land, for consideration to be determined: 

Lot 43, Block 22 Assessor's Map 66 consisting of 3,300 
square feet of land, more or less, located on Fifth 
Avenue, described as follows: 

The land in that part of said Chelmsford called North 
Chelmsford situated on Fifth Avenue and being Lots 178 
and 179 as shown on plan of land entitled "Crystal Lake 
Park owned by Workingmen's Home Realty Trust, Sheet 
1" which plan is recorded with Middlesex North District 
Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 50, Plan 82. 

For title reference, see deed of Edward E. Boudreau, 
dated July 19 1950, and recorded in said Registry at Book 
1 147, Page 506. The Finance Committee is in favor of the 
article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 



69 



UNDER ARTICLE 64. Withdrawn 

UNDER ARTICLE 34. Selectman Philip L. Currier 
moves to remove from the table and moves that the Town 
vote to adopt the following By-Law to read as follows: 

It shall be unlawful for any person to remove any 
materials, designated as recycable by the Board of 
Selectmen, from the curbside in the Town unless prior 
authorization is received from the Board of Selectmen. 
Violation of said By-Law shall be punishable by a fine of 
$100.00 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

Selectman Philip L. Currier moves for adjounement 
sine die at 8:45 P.M. 



DanielJ. Coughlinjr. 
Moderator 

Total Budget 
Article Appr. 
R&A (Annual) 
R&A (Special) 
Total R&A 
Special & Annual 



Regular (Transfers) 
Special (Transfers) 
Total Transfers 



Mary E. St. Hilaire, 
Town Clerk 

$20,255,368.00 

850,123.40 

21,105,491.40 

111,386.92 

21,216,878.32 



804,014.93 

6,500.00 

810,514.93 



Precinct 8. Small Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy 

Junior High School 
Precinct 9. South Row School Auditorium 
Precinct 10. South Row School Auditorium 
Precinct 1 1 . Westlands School Cafeteria 
Precinct 12. Fire House - Old Westford Road 

On Tuesday, the 24th day of May, 1977, being the 
fourth Tuesday in said month, at 10:00 A.M. to 8:00 
P.M. for the following purposes: 

To bring in their votes to the Primary Officers for the 
nomination of candidates for political parties for the 
following office: 



Senator in General Court 



5th Middlesex District 
(to fill vacancy) 



The polls will be open from 10:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with 
your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 

Given under our hands this 11th day of May, A.D., 1977. 

A true copy. ATTEST: 

Philip L. Currier, Chairman 

William R. Murphy 

Joseph B. Shanahan, Jr. 

Arnold J. Lovering 

Paul C. Hart 

Chelmsford Board of Selectmen 



TOWN WARRANT FOR 
SPECIAL STATE PRIMARY 

May 24, 1977 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford to meet in their several polling places, 
viz: 



McFarlin School - All Purpose Room 

North Elementary School Auditorium 

Junior High School (West) Band Room 

East Chelmsford School 

Byam School Cafetorium 

Westlands School Cafeteria 

North Elementary School Auditorium 



Precinct 


1. 


Precinct 


2. 


Precinct 


3. 


Precinct 


4. 


Precinct 


5. 


Precinct 


6. 


Precinct 


7. 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MAY 12, 1977 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 

Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: McFarlin School - All Purpose Room; North 
Elementary School Auditorium; Junior High School 
(West) Band Room; East Chelmsford School; Byam 
School Cafetorium; Westlands School Cafeteria; North 
Elementary School Auditorium; Small Gymnasium, C. 
Edith McCarthy Junior High School; South Row School 
Auditorium; South Row School Auditorium; Westlands 
School Cafeteria; Fire House - Old Westford Road, seven 
days at least before the time appointed for holding the 
meeting aforesaid. 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 

A true copy, Attest: 



70 



SPECIAL DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY 
May 24, 1977 

Prec. 1 Prec. 2 Prec. 3 Prec. 4 Prec. 5 Prec. 6 Prec. 7 Prec. 



Prec. 9 Prec. 10 Prec. 11 Prec. 12 TOTAL 



STATE SENATOR (to fill vacancy) 



5th Middlesex District 




























Carol C. Amick 


75 


33 


60 


23 


59 


66 


44 


37 


92 


104 


88 


75 


756 


Joseph T. Maguire 


21 


56 


44 


48 


21 


34 


54 


23 


14 


32 


33 


43 


423 


Virgina E. Mooney 


2 


1 


1 


1 


3 











2 








3 


13 


All Others 


1 





























1 





2 


Blanks 














1 


2 


1 











1 





5 


TOTAL 


99 


90 


105 


72 


84 


102 


99 


60 


108 


136 


123 


121 


1.199 



SPECIAL REPUBLICAN PRIMARY 
May 24, 1977 

Prec. 1 Prec. 2 Prec. 3 Prec. 4 Prec. 5 Prec. 6 Prec. 7 Prec. 8 Prec. 9 Prec. 10 Prec. 11 Prec. 12 TOTAL 
STATE SENATOR (to fill vacancy) 

5th Middlesex District 
Michael A. Ciara 
Marvin C. Gilkie 
Russell W. Miller 
Markham Lyons 
(Sticker Cand.) 
All Others 
Blanks 
TOTAL 



14 


13 


3 





10 


3 


8 


10 


7 


6 


8 


90 




2 


1 








3 


2 


1 


2 











1 


12 


28 


16 


16 


13 


26 


28 


18 


24 


16 


35 


17 


25 


262 





























2 





1 


3 








2 


1 


1 





1 





1 








1 


7 














2 


1 


3 








6 


2 


1 


15 


44 


30 


21 


14 


42 


34 


31 


36 


24 


49 


27 


37 


389 



SPECIAL AMERICAN PRIMARY 

May 24, 1977 

Prec. 1 Prec. 2 Prec. 3 Prec. 4 Prec. 5 Prec. 6 Prec. 7 Prec. 8 Prec. 9 Prec. 10 Prec. 11 Prec. 12 TOTAL 

STATE SENATOR (to fill vacancy) 

5th Middlesex District 
Parker Weaver 
All Others 
Blanks 

TOTAL 00 00 00000 00 



TOWN WARRANT FOR 

SPECIAL STATE ELECTION 

June 21, 1977 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford to meet in their several polling places, 
viz: 

Precinct 1 . McFarlin School - All Purpose Room 
Precinct 2. North Elementary School Auditorium 



Junior High School (West) Band Room 

East Chelmsford School 

Byam School Cafetorium 

Westlands School Cafeteria 

North Elementary School Auditorium 

Small Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy 

Junior High School 

South Row School Auditorium 

South Row School Auditorium 

Westlands School Cafeteria 

Fire House - Old Westford Road 



On Tuesday, the 21st day of June, 1977, being the 
third Tuesday in said month, at 10:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. 
for the following purposes: 

To bring in their votes to the Election Officers for the 
election of a candidate for the following office: 



Precinct 


3 


Precinct 


4. 


Precinct 


5 


Precinct 


6. 


Precinct 


7. 


Precinct 


8. 


Precinct 


9. 


Precinct 


10 


Precinct 


11 


Precinct 


12. 



Senator in General Court 



5th Middlesex District 
(to fill vacancy) 



71 



The polls will be open from 10:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with 
your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 



Given under our hands this 10th day of June, A.D., 
1977. 



A true copy, Attest: 



Philip L. Currier 

William R. Murphy 

Joseph B. Shanahan, Jr. 

Arnold J. Lovering 

Paul C. Hart 

Chelmsford Board of Selectmen 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

JUNE 13, 1977 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: McFarlin School - All Purpose Room; North 
Elementary School Auditorium; Junior High School (West) 
Band Room; East Chelmsford School; Byam School 
Cafetorium; Westlands School Cafeteria; North Elemen- 
tary School Auditorium; Small Gymnasium, C. Edith 
McCarthy Junior High School; South Row School Audi- 
torium; South Row School Auditorium; Westlands School 
Cafeteria; Fire House - Old Westford Road, seven days 
at least before the time appointed for holding the 
meeting aforesaid. 

A true copy, Attest: 

William E. Spence 

Constable of Chelmsford 



SPECIAL ELECTION 
June 21, 1977 

Prec. 1 Prec. 2 Prec. 3 Prec. 4 Prec. 5 Prec. 6 Prec. 7 Prec. 8 Prec. 9 Prec. 10 Prec. 11 Prec. 12 TOTAL 



STATE SENATOR (to 


All 


vacancy) 


























5th Middlesex District 






























CarolC. Amick 




104 


80 


64 


30 


87 


85 


81 


50 


102 


146 


126 


81 


1.036 


Michael A. Caira 




132 


97 


112 


47 


122 


122 


115 


109 


57 


97 


93 


99 


1.202 


Parker Weaver 




3 


1 

















3 





5 


2 


2 


16 


All Others 











































Blanks 







2 


1 





1 

















1 





5 


TOTAL 




239 


180 


177 


77 


210 


207 


196 


162 


159 


248 


222 


182 


2,259 



WARRANT FOR 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

June 30, 1977 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the of 
Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford to meet in the McCarthy Junior High 
School Auditorim on Thursday, the Thirtieth day of 
June, 1977, at 7:30 P.M. o'clock in the evening, then ant 
there to act upon the following articles, viz: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to amend its 
action taken on Article 1 1 of the Annual Town Meeting 
May 5, 1977, as follows: 

"To see fi the Town will authorize the transfer of 
reimubursement funds in the sum of $545,000.00 



received from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Flood 
Relief Board to pay a bond issue note or notes borrowed 
for the purpose of the reconstruction of Crystal Lake; or 
act in relation thereto." 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money which to meet bills incurred as a result of a 
storm May 9, 1977; or act in relation thereto. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money with which to meet bills for previous years; 
or act in relation thereto. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a 
certain sum of money from the Police Department 
Officers and Administration Account to the Police 
Department Maintenance and Equipment Account; or 
act in relation thereto. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



72 



ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$35,346 to the following-named accounts in the Police 
Department: 



1 . Officers and Administration 

2. Regular and Substitute Account 

or act in relation thereto. 



$ 5,440 
$29,906 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with 
your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 

Given under our hands this 15th day of June, A.D., 
1977. 

A true copy. ATTEST: 

Philip L. Currier, Chairman 

William R. Murphy 

Joseph B. Shanahan, Jr. 

Arnold J. Lovering 

Paul C. Hart 

Chelmsford Board of Selectmen 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
JUNE 15, 1977 
MIDDDLESEX, SS. 

Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notidied and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same of at the following 
places, to wit: McFarlin School - All Purpose Room; 
North Elementary School Auditorium; Junior High 
School (West) Band Room; East Chelmsford School; 
Byam School Cafetorium; Westlands School Cafeteria; 
North Elementary School Auditorium; Small 
Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy Junior High School; 
South Row School Auditorium; South Row School 
Auditorium; Westlands School Cafeteria; Fire House - 
Old Westford Road, fourteen days at least before the time 
appointed for holding the meeting aforesaid. 

A true copy, Attest 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

June 30, 1977 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at 7:50 
P.M by the Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin who recognized 
the presence of a quorum. Chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen Philip L. Currier moves taht the reading of the 
Constable's return of service and the posting of the 
warrant be waived. It was so voted, unanimously. 
Selectman Currier moves that the reading of the entire 
warrant be waived. It was so voted. 



The Moderator then gave a brief explanation of the 
purpose for calling a Special Town Meeting. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1. Selectman Philip L. Currier 
moves that the Town vote to rescind its action taken 
under Article 11 at the Annual Town Meeting of 1977 
and to authorize the transfer of reimbursement funds in 
the sum of $545,000.00 received from the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts Flood Relief Board to 
pay a bond issue note or notes borrowed for the purpose 
of the reconstruction of Crystal Lake. The Finance 
Committee recommends the article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

UNDER ARTICLE 2. Selectman Philip L. Currier 
moves that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
$9,991.80 with which to meet bills incurred as a result of 
a storm on May 9, 1977. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 3. Selectmen Philip L. Currier 
moves that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
$22,126.19 with which to meet bills for previous years. 

The Finance Committee recommends the article. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

UNDER ARTICLE 4. Selectman Philip L. Currier 
moves that the Town vote to transfer $1,175.00 from the 
Police Department Officers and Administration Account 
to the Police Department Maintenance and Equipment 
Account. 

The Finance Committee is in favor of passage. 

Motion Carried, unanimously 

UNDER ARTICLE 5. Selectmen Philip L. Currier 
moves that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $35,346.00 to the following named accounts in the 
Police Department: 

1. Officers and Administration $ 5,440.00 

2. Regular and Substitute Account $29,906.00 

Finance Committee recommends the article. 

Motion Carried 

Selectmen Philip L. Currier moves to adjourned the 
Special Town Meeting sine die at 8:40 P.M. 



Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr. 
Moderator 

Total R & A 
$ 9,991.80 

22,126.19 

35,346.00 



$67,463.99 



Mary E. St. Hilaire 
Town Clerk 

Total Transfers 



$1,175.00 



73 



WARRANT FOR 
SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

December 13, 1977 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford to meet in the McCarthy Junior High 
School Auditorium on Tuesday, the thirteenth day of 
December, 1977, at 7:30 P.M. o'clock in the evening, 
then and there to act upon the following articles, viz: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to approve 
certain proposed changes in the boundary line between 
Chelmsford and Westford, which changes, if approved by 
both Town, shall be submitted to the Department of 
Public Works for review and approval, pursuant to the 
provisions of Section 7 of Chapter 42 of the General 
Laws; or act in relation thereto. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds he sum of 
$122.43 with which to meet bills for previous years; or act 
in relation thereto. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate 
and transfer the sum of $27,339.58 from Antirecession 
Fiscal Assistance funds to congingency salary reserve fund 
for possible salary increases in the Fire Department and 
Highway Department; or act in relation thereto. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the 
sum of $2,500 from Article 2 of the Special Town 
Meeting, May 12, 1977 to Edwards Memorial Beach 
Expense; or act in relation thereto. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to disapprove 
the One Million ($1,000,000.00) Dollar indebtedness 
authorized by the Nashoba Valley Technical High School 
District Committee on November 1, 1977, for the 
purpose of construction, originally equipping and 
furnishing an addition to the existing Regional High 
School and for the purpose of remodelling and makin 
extraordinary repairs to the existing Regional High 
School; or act in relation thereto. 

BOARD OF HEALTH 



Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with 
your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 

Given under our hands this 28th day of November, 
a.d., 1977. 

S/Philip L. Currier, Chairman 

S/William R. Murphy 

S/Joseph B. Shanahan, Jr. 

S/ArnoldJ. Lovering 

S/Paul C. Hart 

Chelmsford Board of Selectmen 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 



NOVEMBER 28, 1977 



Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: McFarlin School - All Purpose Room; NOrth 
Elementary School Auditorium; Colonel Moses Parker 
Junior High School Band Room; East Chelmsford School; 
Byam School Cafetorium; Westlands School Cafeteria; 
North Elementary School Auditorium; Small 
Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy Junior High School; 
South Row School Auditorium; Westlands School 
Cafeteria; Fire House - Old Westford Road, fourteen 
days at least before the time appointed for holding the 
meeting aforesaid. 

A True copy Attest: 

William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

December 13, 1977 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at 7:45 
P.M. by Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin Jr., who 
recognized the presence of a quorum. There were 524 
voters present. 

Chairman of the Board of Selectmen Philip L. Currier, 
moved that the reading of the Constable's return of 
services and the posting of the warrant be waived. It was 
so voted. Selectman Shanahan moved that the reading of 
the entire warrant be waived, It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1. Selectman Philip L. Currier, 
moved that the Town hereby approve the following 
proposed change in the boundary line between 
Chelmsford and Westford: 

Beginning at a point in the existing townline between 
the Town of Chelmsford and the Town of Westford as 
established by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
Chapter 646 of the Acts of 1975; and said point by N 13° 



74 



31' 05" W., 1980. 33 feet on said established town line 
from a town line roadside designated as C-W-5; thence N 
17° 11' 52" W., 767.76 feet to a point; thence N. 11 ° 06' 
21" W., the aforementioned Chapter 646 of the Acts of 
1975. 

All as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Proposed 
Town Line Relocation, Chelmsford & Wesford", Scale 1" 
= 100 feet, dated December, 1977 by Emmons, Fleming 
& Bienvenu, Inc., Engineers and Surveyors, Billerica, 
Massachusetts. 

And that the Board of Selecmen be, and they hereby 
are, authorized, in the name and name and behalf of the 
Town, to submit the proposed change to the Department 
of Public Works for review and approval, pursuant to the 
provisions of Section 7 of Chapter 42 of the General Laws 
and take any and all furhter action which may be 
required in connection therewith in order to comply with 
the applicable provisions of the General Laws. 

Selectman Currier spoke briefly in favor of the article. 

Motion Carried 



UNDER ARTICLE 2. Selecman Philip L. Currier, 
Moved that the Town vote to transfer from the Overlay 
Surplus Reserve the sum of $122.43 to meet bills of 
previous years. 

The Finance Commitee recommended the article. 

Motion Carried, Unanimously 

UNDER ARTICLE 3. Selectman Philip L. Currier, 
moved that the Town vote to transfer from Antirecession 
Fiscal Assistance Funds the sum of $27,339.58 to the 
Contingency Salary Reserve Fund to meet possible salary 
increases in the Fire Department and Highway 
Deapartment. 

The Finance Committee recommended passage of the 
article. Selectman Hart spoke briefly on the article. 

Motion Carried 

UNDER ARTICLE 4. Selectman Philip L. Currier, 
moved that the Town vote to transfer the sum of 
$2,500.00 raised and appropriated under Article 2 of the 
Special Town Meeting May 12, 1977, to the following 
account under Edwards memorial Beach: 

1 . Expenses 

The Finance Commitee was in favor of the article. 
Selecman Lovering explained why the Board of 
Selectmen were in favor of passage. Robert 
McManamon, Chairman of the Varney Playground 
Commission, spoke against the article. After a lengthy 
discussion a vote was taken: 



UNDER ARTICE 5. Selecman Philip L. Currier, 
moved that the Town disapprove the One Million 
($1,000,000.00) dollar indebtedness authorized by the 
Nashoba Valley Technical High School District 
Committee on NOvember 1, 1977, for the purpose of 
constructing, originally equipping, and furnishing an 
addition to the existing Regional High School and for the 
purpose of remodeling and making extraordinary repairs 
to the existing Regional High School. 

Chariman of the N.V.T.H.S.D.C. Stratos Dukakis, 
gave a presentation explaining the reasons and needs for 
the authorization. The Finance Committe was in favor of 
the authorization. Selectman Shanahan explained why 
the Selectmen want the article to pass, as worded, (giving 
disapproval on authorizing the One Million Dollar 
indebtedness) After a lengthy discussion William 
Clements moved the question to stop debate. The 
Moderator attempted to receive a unanimous vote. 
Hearing none, a hand vote was taken. The following 
tellers were appointed: 



Richard Burtt 
Carrie Fenn 
David McLachlan 



Carl Olsson 

Ruth Delaney 

Carolyn Bennett 



A hand vote resulted 439 in favor of stopping debate, 
1 1 against, the motion carried to stop debate. 

A vote was taken on the Main Motion, Yes 347 No 125, 

Motion Carried as worded in the article to disapprove the 
One Million indebtedness. 

Selectman Currier made a motion to adjourned at 9:45 
P.M. Sine die, 



Motion Carried 

DanielJ. Coughlinjr. 
Moderator 



Mary E. St. Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



Motion Carried 



75 




SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Carol C. Cleven, Chairman 



MyraJ. Silver, Vice-Chairman 
William K. Sharpley, jr., Secretary 



Rev. Harry A. Foster 
Stan Norkunas 



Robert M. McHugh, High School Student Member 
Thomas L. Rivard, Superintendent 

THE ANNUAL REPORT FOR 1977 



Years 


Teachers 


Non-Teachers 


Budget 


Expenditures 


Enrollment 


1972 


497 


273 


8,305,023. 


8,090,812. 


8,990. 


1973 


512 


296 


14,767,112. 


14,328,428. 


9,059. 


1974 


548 


324 


10,660,533. 


10,532,793. 


9,627. 


1975 


553 


331 


11,719,467. 


11,719,112. 


9,555. 


1976 


565 


336 


12,348,725. 


12,337,877. 


9,311. 


1977-78 


550 


298 


13,024,958. 




8,936. 



Includes Part Time Personnel 

Includes Federal Funds 

Eighteen Month Budget (1/1/73-6/30/74) 

Not Finalized until 6/30/78 



The annual report for 1977 ... a record of some of the 
events of special interest an importance. 

The year 1977 includes the end of the 1976-1977 school 
year, events occurring during the summer period, and 
the beginning of a new 1977-1978 school year. This 
overlap of time has special significance because it calls to 
one's attention that education does not stop . . . nor does 
it simply start ... it continues. The very process of 
education emphasizes the veneration that it deserves. In 
the past ... in the present . . . and for the future it 
represents the hope of mankind. 

It is becoming clearly apparent that the trends of the 
last few years continued to affect our schools in 1977 and 



will undoubtedly continue in 1978 and for several years 
thereafter. These trends can be identified as declining 
enrollment, higher educational standards, higher salary 
rates and inflation. The most readily discernible effects 
of these trends is the annual school budget increase. 
These trends reflect nation-wide conditions and are by no 
means unique to our Town or Commonwealth. 

Keeping in mind that the primary goal of Chelmsford 
Public Schools is to provide good education in a cost 
effective manner, the School Committee has as its 
objectives for the 1978 school year the following: 

1. To be actively involved in the curriculum planning 
process, ensuring that Chelmsford students develop 



76 



to their fullest potential. 

2. To continue to expand the plan of alternative 
education which will allow a choice of instructional 
programs to parents and pupils in each elementary 
school. 



3. To be aware of and sensitive to community values, 
attitudes and curricular concerns. 



. To develop a 3 to 5 year plan which will include a 
projection of enrollment and staff, facilities, class 
organization and funding needed to maintain and/ 
or increase the quality of education appropriately 
for that enrollment, considering among other things: 

4.1 reduction in number of positions 

4.2 facilities consolidation and improvement 

4.3 grade level restructuring 

4.4 redistricting of school boundaries 



Chelmsford's official enrollment of 8,936 for the school 
year 1977-1978 represents a decline of 375 students or 
4.02% from the 9,311 enrolled in 1976-1977. The specific 
enrollment detail for all schools by grade level is shown in 
Table 1 . This year, in addition to the decline of 299 
pupils in the elementary schools, the junior high schools' 
enrollment decreased by 93 students. (In contrast, the 
high school enrollment increased by 22.) The decline in 
enrollment at the elementary level resulted in closing the 
twenty classroom building of the McFarlin School complex 
and reopening of the four classroom Highland School for 
the current school year. The School Committee has 
appointed an Ad Hoc Committee to conduct a study out- 
lining an orderly response to the currently perceived 
decline in student enrollment within the Chelmsford 
School System. The goal of the Declining Enrollment 
Study Committee is to prepare a systemwide plan of 
action for the next five year period. It is anticipated that 
the Study Committee will make its final report by early 
fall. 



STUDENT ENROLLMENT 



School 


K 


Gr. 1 


Gr. 2 


Gr. 3 


Gr. 4 


Gr. 5 


Gr. 6 


Gr. 7 


Gr. 8 


Gr. S 


Byam 


76 


94 


101 


121 


115 


125 


112 








Center 


54 


77 


96 


98 


95 


96 


58 








Harrington 

Highland 

McFarlin 


88 


97 


112 


124 


106 


130 

117 


108 
270 








North 


94 


118 


128 


139 


109 












South Row 


55 


73 


90 


102 


82 


90 


58 








Westlands 


105 


131 


124 


120 


120 


121 


107 








McCarthy 
Parker 
















418 
334 


452 
363 


402 
327 


High 























Gr. 10 Gr. 11 Gr. 12 Sp. Ed. Total 







744 




15 


589 
765 
117 
270 
588 




22 


572 
828 
1272 




24 


1048 


731 




2143 


IPC 







None of the School Committee's responsibilities is more 
vital than maintaining the quality of the curriculum and 
instructional programs. A complete description of the 
curriculum offered by the Chelmsford Public Schools and 
the effects involved in its maintainance is too lengthy for 
inclusion in this annual report. However, there are aspects 
to curriculum revision and development that deserve 
attention. 

The major task in curriculum work is organizing 
content at each grade level so that it has greatest effect in 
terms of meeting fundamental goals. 

Throughout the year members of the professional staff 
meet regularly to evaluate present curricula, to consider 
trends, to evaluate test results, and to suggest new, 
appropriate areas for action. 

During the summer of 1977, teachers worked on up- 
grading curricula in the fields of Language Arts, Reading, 
Mathematics, Foreign Language, and Social Studies. 
The resulting materials were distributed to all teachers at 
the appropriate grade level and are currently in use. 



Planning teaching strategies and materials to permit 
students to progress according to their needs requires a 
dedicated commitment of effort and time. The following 
excerpts which are taken from reports written by school 
personnel will help readers of this report to understand 
better some of the learning experiences their children are 
having in our schools today. 

FROM THE COORDINATOR OF 
LANGUAGE ARTS 

Curriculum development is a continuous process of 
change based on needs and interests that have been 
carefully examined and assessed. In this context, areas of 
the language arts curriculum which are needed and 
effective are maintained, while those that are in- 
appropriate or ineffective are revised or dropped. 

At the elementary level, the Language Arts Committee 
in each of the elementary schools continues to serve as a 
barometer for the needs of teachers and children. The 
committees, consisting of a representative from each 



77 



grade level within each school, make recommendations 
about the strengths and weaknesses of the language arts 
program. They also review and field-test new materials 
such as language builders which classify pictures on the 
basis of grammatical word categories, console kits with 
self-correcting formats for readiness skills, and com- 
munications programs utilizing telephones. The input 
from these committees helps in determining the common- 
ality that exists within and among the elementary schools 
and in adjusting the various points of view so that they 
move in a direction suggested by current scholarship in 
language and in psychology. 

Many of the language arts curriculum changes this 
year were made at the elementary level. A new curriculum 
guide- -The Language Arts Competencies Guide for 
Mechanical Skills in Writing, Grades K-6--was developed 
during a summer workshop. It provides the objectives, 
activities, tests, and resources for teaching grammar, 
punctuation, and capitalization. In addition to recom- 
mending and encouraging the use of a variety of materials 
and strategies for teaching mechanical skills, the guide 
provides the structure and the framework within which 
the skills can be effectively taught. A Student Profile 
Chart based on the skills addressed by the guide was also 
devised for grades four to six. 

Another important change in the elementary language 
arts program is the introduction of a new spelling program 
for grades two to six. The new program is research-based 
and features a current word list (which includes 97% of 
the words a child should be able to use in his/her writing), 
varied creative writingassignments, a spiraling sequence 
of dictionary skills, a dictionary organized specifically for 
helping spelling, and a variety of language arts activities 
which can be used at the discretion of the teacher. The 
responses of children and teachers to the program have 
been positive and reassuring. 

The new spelling program will be extended to grades 
seven and eight in September. Several junior high school 
teachers have been working on integrating the spelling 
program with units currently being taught. In addition to 
this formal spelling program, spelling lists generated 
from students' compositions are and will continue to be 
an integral part of teaching spelling at the junior high 
school level. 

Another change in the junior high school curriculum is 
the development of an annotated reading list for grades 
seven and eight. The list, compiled in cooperation with 
the library, will be available this spring. Parents may 
request the list from the junior high school library or 
from an English teacher. 

The junior high schools will continue to use diagnostic 
and mastery tests in mechanical skills at each grade level. 
They will also continue to monitor a student's progress in 
writing by keeping writing folders for each student in 
grades seven to nine. These folders are transferred with 
the student from year to year at the junior high schools 



and will follow the student to the high school. Finally, as 
was the case last year, teachers at both junior high schools 
will exchange classroom visits with the elementary schools 
and with the high school. 

For the past two years, both junior high schools have 
been working on the self-evaluation which will be com- 
pleted next year. Each teacher has been serving on several 
evaluation committees within and outside of his/her grade 
level and subject area. After the self -evaluation has been 
completed, an intelligent determination can be made of 
the best way to effect whatever changes are needed. 

At the high school, English teachers have been meeting 
on a regular basis to examine current materials and 
practices in teaching literature and writing and to make 
recommendations on guidelines for various levels of year- 
long curriculum courses. The English program will 
continue to provide a reasonable balance between elective 
and required courses, between full -year and semester 
courses, and between homogenous and heterogenous 
classes. A number of unifying practices will also continue 
to be supported: maintaining a reasonable balance of 
reading and writing in each_ course, diagnostic and 
achievement tests for mechanical skills in writing, and 
writing folders which make available the accumulative 
reading and writing assignments for each student. 

Starting in the junior year, a new honors program in 
English will be offered in September, 1978. Students who 
are successful in this program will be invited to participate 
in an Advanced Placement course during their senior 
year. Advanced Placement in English refers specifically 
to the senior year where a student following a course 
consistent with the College Entrance Examination Board 
Advanced Placement Program does work which is the 
equivalent of college freshmen English. 

Two new English elective courses will also be offered 
at the high school-Science Fiction and Periodical 
Literature. The Science Fiction elective will cover a wide 
variety of science fiction books which explore what the 
world might be like tomorrow or a million years from now. 
Periodical Literature is designed to teach students to 
read, understand, and appreciate a wide variety of 
periodical literature ranging from the Boston Globe to 
The New Yorker. 

To provide the highest quality of instruction possible, 
the language arts curriculum in Chelmsford is constantly 
in the process of being evaluated and improved: the weak 
areas strengthened, the strong areas reinforced. It is 
only in this way that Chelmsford's language arts curriculum 
can remain sensitive to the needs of students and teachers 
and responsive to change whenever necessary or ap- 
propriate. 

FROM THE COORDINATOR OF READING 

The goal of the reading program in the Chelmsford 
schools is to provide the opportunity for each student to 
reach his/her own potential in developing the ability to 



78 



read for necessity and for pleasure. The opportunity is 
provided for students to develop proficiency in using 
word recognition, comprehension, and study skills to gain 
essential information from a variety of types of materials 
read for specific purposes. Opportunity is also provided 
for students to become proficient in applying interpretive 
and creative reading skills in order to gain pleasure from 
reading for recreational purposes. 

The reading programs in the Chelmsford schools 
provide the above opportunities in the following ways. 
Current basal instructional materials representing various 
teaching approaches provide appropriate basic skill 
instruction for children of varying learning rates and 
styles. Additionally, a variety of supplementary materials 
provide worthwhile skill reinforcement work for children, 
according to each child's specific needs. Frequent in- 
service sessions for teachers provide information on the 
most effective ways of using the various materials in the 
classroom. 

School libraries, being an integral part of a total 
reading program, provide the foundation for students 
developing breadth and depth in their ability to apply all 
types of reading skills. To augment the integration of 
basic skill learning with application of the skills in wide 
reading, the reading coordinator has purchased certain 
supplementary materials for classrooms that require the 
reading of library books as the basis for skill reinforcement 
activities. Every effort is made to have students gain 
breadth and depth of knowledge through wide reading. 

There are reading teachers in each school who act as 
consultants to classroom teachers to provide appropriate 
basic and supplementary materials for each child, to 
advise on accurate group placement for instruction for 
each child, and to see that each child's progress is 
continuously evaluated to be sure that his/her needs are 
being met. The reading teachers also diagnose the 
reading skill needs of individual children; give small 
group instruction based on the diagnosed needs; and 
provide adapted reading programs to correlate with the 
skill needs and abilities of the individual children. Audio- 
visual equipment and programs are provided in 
classrooms and libraries in each school, to provide 
alternative ways of reinforcing skills and enjoying 
literature, thus strengthening the learning of children 
who may respond better either to visual or auditory 
presentation of material. 

All of the above-mentioned instructional and supple- 
mentary materials, and audio- visual programs, support 
the teaching of the reading skill sequence as outlined in 
the reading curriculum guide of the Chelmsford Public 
Schools. 

At the junior high and high school levels, there are 
developmental, remedial, and enrichment reading 
programs to provide instruction in the areas of word 
recognition, comprehension, study skills, and interpretive 
reading skills. Instruction in the developmental and 
remedial programs provides the opportunity of skill 



development for students to achieve their potential levels 
of reading proficiency. Enrichment reading programs 
provide opportunity for breadth and depth of vocabulary 
development, wide reading experience with teacher 
guidance, practice in increasing reading speed, and 
generally refining and increasing efficiency in applying 
reading skills according to type of material and purpose 
for reading. At the upper grade levels, as in the lower 
grades, many types of materials as well as audio- visual 
equipment and programs, provide skill instruction and 
reinforcement to meet the particular needs of individual 
students. 

Central planning to purchase basic instructional and 
support material and to provide necessary teacher in- 
service training according to a definite design to achieve 
specific purposes at each grade level and throughout the 
system provides the above described opportunities for 
children in the Chelmsford schools. 

The granting of the carefully planned requests for 
federal and school funds in the past year for the reading 
program make possible purposeful, well-adapted and 
continuous instruction for students in the total school 
system. 

FROM THE COORDINATOR OF MATHEMATICS 

The mathematics program in the Chelmsford Public 
Schools currently is an amalgamation of the advantages 
of the so called "New Math" with the advantages of the 
more "Traditional" system. The primary objective of the 
mathematics program continues to focus on the develop- 
ment of creativity, competence, and interest in the field 
of mathematics. Computational skills and problem solving 
abilities are two of the most important goals of the 
school mathematics program at all levels. Teachers, 
parents, and administrators are working diligently to 
help students gain a coherent understanding of math- 
ematical methods and to master basic skills and problem 
solving processes. 

Because the results of academic research indicate that 
many children benefit from the use of manipulative 
materials in mathematics concept development, a sig- 
nificant effort has been made to use various concrete 
materials in the elementary classroom. A great number of 
workshops on the techniques of using manipulative 
materials have been held for elementary teachers during 
the last year. In addition, a Mathematics Resource Center 
has been established for all teachers. This center contains 
materials frequently used in mathematics instruction and 
operates as a central lending service from which teachers 
may borrow and examine materials for classroom use. 
This more efficient allocation of resources will realize a 
substantial savings for the town and result in an increased 
use of current and innovative materials in all classrooms. 

In addition to the use of manipulative materials in 
instruction, provisions are being made for children with 
varying abilities in mathematics. For children having 



79 



difficulty in mathematics, various remedial programs 
which emphasize basic understanding and skill acquisition 
are being employed. For the most talented children, a 
significant achievement has been accomplished in provid- 
ing each teacher in grades three (3) to six (6) with the 
curriculum guide, Math Horizons. Math Horizons con- 
tains materials designed to challenge highly motivated 
students in mathematics and to produce productive 
thinking and problem solving training. In this way the 
material develops and expands the breadth and depth 
of a student's knowledge of mathematics and gives a very 
broad foundation for the future study of mathematics. 

The study of the metric system of measurement 
continues to be introduced into the elementary schools. 
Materials and curriculum guides have been provided for 
teachers of grades one (1), two (2), and three (3) and will 
be extended into the intermediate grades during the next 
year. A number of curriculum workshops on measurement 
have been held for teachers. Because the metric system is 
beginning to very slowly replace another system of 
measurement, many valuable opportunities are being 
created to study the more general aspects of measurement. 
This gradual conversion means that both measurement 
systems will be discussed in the classroom, but increased 
importance will be given to the metric system as conversion 
advances. 

At the secondary level, a great number of courses are 
offered so that individual students have many choices 
available in mathematics. At the high school, math- 
ematics is not a required subject. However, during the 
current year, nearly 90% of the student body elected to 
study mathematics. The students are able to choose 
courses from an offering which includes three levels of 
Calculus, various levels of Advanced Mathematics, 
Algebra, Geometry, and Basic Math. The content of 
various mathematics courses has recently been revised to 
include college board and basic skill review. Practical 
Living, an interdisciplinary course developed by the 
mathematics department, continues to be improved and 
now includes the study of many essential areas such as 
insurance, tax, banking, home improvement, and money 
management. 

More extensive use is being made of the computer 
resources at Chelmsford High School through the develop- 
ment of the mathematics laboratory. In addition to a 
basic programming course, initial steps are being con- 
sidered to provide a unit on computer literacy and 
experience for a broader segment of the student 
population. This increased interest in the use of the 
computer reflects a national trend to recognize and 
develop computer skills among students. 

The junior high mathematics program continues to 
provide various levels of mathematics instruction in 
largely homogeneous classes. Recent effort has been given 
to the development of the advanced seventh grade 
program at both junior highs. At all levels new textbooks 



or materials are being employed to reflect innvoations in 
national curricula. 

During the past several months, competency-based 
education has been receiving increased publicity as the 
next major reform movement in education. Currently 
this interest is reflected in a proposal by the Massachusetts 
State Board of Education to establish essential competency 
standards for high school graduation. This proposal is 
still under consideration and promises to be the center 
of much discussion and study. 

In anticipation of this movement toward essential 
competencies, the secondary mathematics teachers in 
Chelmsford began to study the situation in 1974 and 
took steps to develop an essential competency exam for 
students in the eighth grade. During each year since 1974, 
the exam has been revised to include more reliable test 
items and presently represents a highly respectable 
Criterion Referenced Test of Basic Computational Skills. 
Currently the test is used by all teachers at the eighth 
grade level to identify areas in which the students may 
need reinforcement of mathematical skills. 

The mathematics program in the Chelmsford Pulbic 
Schools continues to provide a rich and rewarding ex- 
perience for all students and remains committed to the 
development of competence and creativity in math- 
ematics. 

FROM THE COORDINATOR OF 
SOCIAL STUDIES 

In September 1820, Thomas Jefferson noted: 

/ know of no safe repository of the ultimate 
powers of the society but the people themselves; 
and if we think them not enlightened enough 
to exercise their control with a wholesome 
discretion, the remedy is not to take it from 
them, but to inform their discretion by ed- 
ucation. 

The Chelmsford social studies program takes seriously 
its responsibility to prepare our youth to assume roles as 
responsible adult citizens. This responsibility had a special 
focus on two specific areas during the past year: 
law studies and economic education. 

Last summer a group of elementary and secondary 
teachers identified the objectives of the social studies 
program as a whole which were law-related and then 
developed a guide for teachers which included activities 
and materials which could be used to develop these 
objectives at a specific grade level. Law-related activities 
are found in the social studies program from kindergarten 
through high school. Many of these activities are informal 
in nature and are worked into an activity which may 
have many purposes. Law studies has a major focus, 
however, in two of the units (Contrasting Communities in 
the United States and Early California Gold Mining 



80 



Camp) at the third grade level, in a short unit at the 
fifth grade level, as a major part of the judicial process 
and Constitutional units in the ninth grade political 
science course, and in two one-semester elective courses 
offered to high school students. Law studies is also the 
focus of a federally funded project for gifted students at 
Chelmsford High School. 

Economics and consumer economics showed great 
viability during the past year. 

The economic education program at the fourth grade 
level was strengthened through a series of activities 
conducted in cooperation with the Federal Reserve Bank 
of Boston. The unit taught at this level helps children 
find out in simple terms how our economic system 
operates. Children not only learn about basic economic 
concepts such as goods and services, producers and 
consumers, division of labor, and factors of production, 
but also look at factors which affect consumer choice, 
factors affecting prices and wages, and ways in which 
business firms compete and are organized. The program 
includes a strong career education componenet as well. 
Education specialists from the Federal Reserve Bank not 
only conducted an intensive teacher workshop last fall 
but also visited and conducted activities with each class- 
room working with the economics unit. The consumer 
economics course at the high school showed a sharp 
increase in enrollment as a growing number of students 
became concerned with consumerism and our free enter- 
prise system. The program at this level is obviously in 
more depth and is designed to help young men and 
women handle their financial responsibilities wisely. 
Emphasis is placed on the practical problems relating to 
the budgeting of one's income, the purchasing of 
consumer goods and services, fighting inflation, and 
avoiding fraud and deception. 

Both the law studies and economics studies activities 
provide basic skills four our students as they grow to 
assume their roles as citizens in a free society. 

Additional highlights of the social studies program 
during the past year included the administration of an 
extensive basic skills testing program at the junior high 
school level to diagnose the student's ability to use skills 
in social studies such as recognizing point of view, 
classifying information, reading tables, graphs, and maps, 
interpreting cartoons, drawing inferences, and weighing 
the validity of sources . . . Through the cooperation of the 
Chelmsford Historical Commission and the Marinel 
Transportation Company, second grade children had the 
opportunity to simulate an early New England school day 
at the little red school house across from the Town 
Common. 

FROM THE COORDINATOR OF SCIENCE 

The Science Curriculum in the Chelmsford Public 
Schools is a well articulated program of inquiry and 
concept building throughout grades K-12. Multistimuli 



methodology encouraging the active participation of the 
student is an essential part of the learning process in 
science. 

The elementary science program, Science Curriculum 
Improvement Study, or SCIS, is a sequential physical and 
life science program. It is a laboratory centered approach 
which combines content, process, and attitude and 
provides each learner with opportunities to participate 
according to his own level of ability, to interact with his 
peers, and to improve his understanding of both the 
products and processes of the scientific enterprise. 

The program has been influenced particularly by 
Piaget's theories on how children acquire, organize, and 
conceptualize information. According to Piaget, the 
elementary school child is able to rearrange the order of 
events in his mind, anticipate some effects of his actions 
and represent his thoughts to himself as long as he has a 
concrete base of experience from which to operate. The 
SCIS program is designed to help children form positive 
attitudes toward science as they explore new phenomena. 

The Intermediate Science Curriculum Study or SCIS 
program is a sequential laboratory oriented program 
based on individualized instruction. The ISCS program 
allows each student to work at his own pace on some 
concept in science. The aim of the program is to give the 
student a general education in science that is applicable 
to the wide diversity of school and life situations. 

Honors Biology is again being taught at the ninth 
grade level. The BSCS Green version, or the ecological 
approach to the study of biology, is used. Ecology and 
environmental awareness are major concepts stressed in 
the program. 

At the high school level, all of the science curriculum 
offerings are inquiry oriented with the major emphasis 
placed on laboratory experiences as the learning process. 
The enrollment in all areas of the high school science 
curriculum is continually increasing. In the past three 
years, the enrollment in anatomy and photography has 
doubled. 

The Honors Physics Program has been strengthened to 
include more integration with caluclus. 

The Advanced Chemistry course continues to be a 
highly individualized program using modular packages 
consisting of textual material, a rigorous testing program 
and optional experiments that continually are being 
revised. 

The Senior Science Program has been redesigned to 
include modular units in career oriented science. Studies 
include aspects of the physical, chemical, biological, and 
medical fields of science. Each unit consists of textual 
material, demonstrations and laboratory exercises. 

The future of science, including the role it plays in our 
society, will be decided by both the scientist and the non- 
scientist. To make wise decisions, the non-scientist will 



81 



have to have an understanding of the real nature of 
science. The Chelmsford Science Program is attempting 
to reach this goal. 

At the high school level, Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, 
CPR, has been offered to several classes of senior students. 

An in-service program has been developed to allow 
staff members to achieve American Red Cross certification 
in CPR. A similar program is being offered to townspeople 
through the adult education program. 

One of the goals of the health education program is to 
provide each graduating senior with the opportunity to 
achieve American Red Cross certification in CPR and 
First Aid. 

FROM THE COORDINATOR OF 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION: 

During the year 1977, our Physical Education program 
continued to improve. We have fully implemented our 
Curriculum Guide and our instructors are beginning to 
develop expertise in most of the activities. Workshops, 
in-service progress, and clinics have helped in the 
curriculum area. 

For the first time, all students in Chelmsford have at 
least two periods of Physical Education per week. Also, 
for the first time in years, all schools are using their gyms 
for physical education. In the past, some gyms were used 
for classroom space. 

We sense a new interest in fitness and conditioning. 
We are working on ideas for our curriculum and for a 
townwide testing program for all students. 

ATHLETICS: 

Chelmsford has become very much involved in Athletics. 
The youth programs and recreation programs have made 
vital contributions. With teams at both McCarthy and 
Parker feeding into our high school program, we are 
getting more and better-skilled athletes (both boys and 
girls). As a resutl, Chelmsford teams are highly com- 
petitive and successful in terms of wins and losses. 

The Wrestling team won the State Championship for 
the second year in a row. The Basketball, Girls' Softball 
and Volleyball teams all were in the State Tournaments. 
The Track team won the State Decathlon Championship, 
and the Cross Country team won the State Division I 
Championship this fall. 

The Football team was Co-Champion for the Merri- 
mack Valley Conference for the first time in eleven years. 

All of our other teams finished high in the league 
standings, with many boys and girls selected as all-league 
and some as all-state players. We are all very proud of the 
athletic accomplishments. 

Chelmsford was also awarded the Sportsmanship 
Trophy by the Greater Lowell Basketball Officials 



Association for the conduct of the players, coaches, and 
spectators. 

INTRAMURALS: 

We have intramurals at the High School, Parker and 
McCarthy. In September, late buses were reduced from 
four days a week to two days. This has had an effect 
on our program by decreasing the number of boys and 
girls participating. 

Gymnastics, Soccer, Volleyball, and Basketball con- 
tinue to be our most popular activities. At the High 
School, Weight Training ranks high with the athletes 
during their off season. 

Some of the elementary schools have conducted intra- 
mural programs voluntarily or with funds provided by 
their PTO's. 

FROM THE SUPERVISOR OF 
FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

This past year, important changes were implemented 
in the areas of curriculum materials, curriculum offer- 
ings, and organization. 

After two years on a trial basis, the School Committee 
approved the adoption of new audio-lingual-visual 
materials for the French program. This year was the first 
of a four-year conversion schedule designed to integrate 
the new materials into the Grades 7 through 10 curriculum. 
Based on previous experience, the new text and supporting 
media will help to create more verbally fluent students, 
standardize the learning outcome of the program, and 
improve articulation between levels. 

Because of the success of the French IV elective 
program, the same flexibility was introduced into the 
Spanish IV level. This year, students chose either a 
comprehensive Spanish IV course or two of the following 
electives: Latin American Indian Civilizations, Hispanic 
Culture and Cuisine, Modern Spain. The result was a 
dramatic impact on the enrollment for this advanced 
study which went from 43 in 1976 to 86 in 1977. 

At the French IV level, an advanced placement course 
was added to the curriculum. 

Organizationally, the department created separate 
Level II classes for the students in the shorter language 
sequences; i.e., for those who began language study in 
grades nine or ten. This change will allow the faculty 
to use teaching techniques and methods more responsive 
to the learning style of these students without budgetary 
impact. 

In its aim to improve the verbal fluency of its students, 
the Foreign Language Department received a major 
boost from the School Committee which approved 
Chelmsford High's participation in a student exchange 
program with a French high school. Under the concept 
of the exchange, approximately 15 Chelmsford students 



82 



will spend three weeks at the Lycee Montesquieu in 
LeMans, France, followed by a reciprocal experience for 
15 French students at Chelmsford High School. We 
believe that this unique experience will be most effective 
in improving student motivation and skills. 

FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR OF ART 

It is the goal of the Art Department that every student 
in the Chelmsford Schools will be aware of the visually 
oriented world in which he lives and will have an 
appreciation for the many forms of Art and their artists 
that contribute to his/her world. 

Many students achieve greater goals because they 
develop their skills and talents to produce various forms 
of Art at very high levels of proficiency. Some win prizes . 
. . some exhibit . . . some go on to Art School or College . 
. . some work in the commercial or fine art world . . . 
and most important of all, some discover satisfaction and 
a new understanding of themselves through self-expression. 

All students from Kindergarten through Junior High 
are involved in some form of Art Education. In the 
primary levels, they are working with colors, shapes, 
simple media to learn how to use their hands with their 
muscles and with their eyes. The elementary level provides 
more complex forms of media and simple design 
problems. At the Junior High level, the students explore 
a series of problems to be solved through various elements 
of design and color. Artists and their work are discussed 
at every level, and museum trips are encouraged for 
clubs and class trips. 

Tbe High School Art Department offers many elective 
courses that serve both the student who enjoys Art as an 
avocation as well as the serious student who is preparing 
a portfolio for Art Schools or Colleges. 

FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR OF MUSIC 

The purpose of music education in the public schools 
of Chelmsford is to assist students to appreciate, under- 
stand, participate, and respond with sensitivity to the 
aesthetic effect of music, according to their individual 
capacities. 

The Music Department is committed to excellence in 
music at all levels and strives to help students discover 
and develop their muscial talents for better understanding 
and enjoyment of all kinds of music . 

Most elementary schools have a resident music specialist 
who is responsible for all music education in the building, 
with the exception of instruction on band and orchestral 
instruments. Each school has weekly lessons in music 
along with a performing choral group. All schools have 
song flute ensembles and/or recorder consorts. Some 
schools have guitar clubs, dance groups, or Orff bands. 

Our curriculum guide is based on the conceptual 
approach. We have spiral curriculum that begins in 
kindergarten and continues through junior high school. 



Music in the junior high school is required of all 
seventh and eighth graders, and is available to ninth 
graders on an elective basis. General music in seven and 
eight is basically designed for non-performing students 
and, for many, it is their last formal contact with school 
music. Choral groups are available on an elective basis. 

The high school has course offerings for both per- 
forming and non-performing students. A staff of two and 
one-third instructors offers courses in music appreciation, 
theory, guitar class, small and large vocal and in- 
strumental ensembles, instrumental instruction, and 
practice rooms for individual study. 

Instrumental music in our schools provides an ex- 
perience not found in other areas within the music 
department. Orchestral string instruments are offered 
starting in grade three, while all band and orchestral 
instruments are included from grades six through twelve. 
Every interested student has an opportunity to participate 
in small-group instruction during school time, and 
ensembles during school time, or after school as part of 
the extra-curricular program. 

Instrumental ensembles participate in school and 
community programs throughout the school year. 

REPORT OF THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR OF 
CAREER EDUCATION 

Teachers of the Career Education Department, namely 
those of the Business Education Department, Distributive 
Education Department, Home Economics Department, 
and the Industrial Arts Department are continuing to use 
the community as a very rich resource for guest speakers 
within their classrooms. The Business Department has 
had speakers from local real estate offices (Emerson), 
local Police Department, Purity Supreme, Inc., Fire 
Department, and a local bank. 

The Retail Merchandising class has had speakers from 
local retail stores. The class was a guest of the Sharon 
King "Women '77 Show." Students also visited the 
Kernwood Restaurant to see informal modeling by 
professional Hart models. The students also have an 
annual trip to the Northeast Trade Center to view a 
trade show featuring women's apparel. The Distributive 
Education Department had had speakers from local area 
retailing and wholesaling companies. 

In our shorthand classes, we have been using job 
promotion and job up-grading as a means of creating 
higher student interest in these classes. Representatives 
from local business schools also frequent our classrooms, 
keeping our students informed about their schools and 
the job-market situation. 

As reported last year, we were planning on offering a 
Typing III course. This course is operating now. This 
course was designed for those students who are looking 
for advanced typing skills centered around the more 
specialized areas of business, such as legal and medical 



83 



fields. In conjunction with this Typing III program, we 
have submitted a proposal and are hoping for a grant of 
$59,000 from the Federal Government. This grant will 
bring to our Business Department additional advanced 
typewriters and transcribers at no cost from local taxes. 

The Distributive Education Department, which was 
new to our school last year, continues to grow in student 
numbers. This class has an enrollment of 31 students at 
the present time. 

The programs in Home Economics and Industrial Arts 
at all levels are continuing to stress career exploration. 
Once again, the community is being well used for resource 
people to our classroom teaching. In these departments, 
we have had sixteen guest speakers. 

The expected outcome of our Home Economics 
curriculum does teach students occupational skills hi 
sewing and cooking; however, it goes a long way further 
than these particular areas. Competencies and concepts 
that can help students function more effectively as 
individuals and as members of family groups during their 
adolescent years and in later adult life are also taught. 
Some of the areas stressed Human Relations, Survival for 
Singles, Child Development, and Adult Living. 

Our Industrial Arts Department continues to be a 
subject area with which students enjoy becoming involved. 
Our program in Industrial Arts is entirely elective after 
the 8th grade level; however, our student enrollment 
remains strong, indicating that students do enjoy these 
subject areas. 

Two new courses were added to the high school 
curriculum this year. These courses-Fine Furniture 
Making and House Construction-are open only to 
students who have not had any Industrial Arts experiences. 
We found our curriculum was lacking for those students 
who were too deeply involved in their other subject areas 
to take the Industrial Arts program, but would like to be 
able to become familiar with some skills they might need 
in later life. 



FROM THE HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 

Organizationally, the school continued to operate 
under the House Plan, despite the absence of a dean for 
Hawthorne House, and attempted to reduce a large 
school atmosphere to a more personal, meaningful 
educational experience for its students. A school as large 
as Chelmsford High School has problems common to any 
large society. Through the efforts of the students, staff 
and support personnel these problems are being met and 
minimized on a daily basis. 

Chelmsford High School continued to offer an out- 
standing and diversified Program of Studies which saw 
the Advancement Placement Program grow to now in- 
clude Calculuc, Advanced Caluclus, Advanced Chemistry 
and French IV. 



The philosophy of combining the assets of the 
Community and the Academic areas were further 
enhanced with the growht of the Distributive Education 
Program, the Service Study Program and Work Study 
Program. This philosophy has its basis in a sound 
Career Education Program. As time goes on, Chelmsford 
High School is expanding its commitment to Career 
Education by sponsoring and participating in Career 
Exploration Days and by maintaining an effective Career 
Education Center. 

1977 was another successful year for Chelmsford High 
School. The student body brought honors to Chelmsford 
High School in the areas of academics, athletics and other 
extra curricular activities. The Class of 1977 was honored 
to have one of its members named a finalist in the 
Presidential Scholar Program. In addition, the class had 
a National Merit Scholar, four finalists and fourteen 
letters of commendation. Other achievements of dis- 
tinction for Chelmsford High School students were: 
a second consecutive State Championship in Wrestling, 
a State Championship in Cross Country, a State Decathlon 
Championship, Merrimack Valley Co-Championship for 
Softball and Football. 

The National Honor Society inducted 119 new students 
last May, forty-one (41) members of the Class of 1977 and 
seventy-eight (78) members of the Class of 1978. 

The Math Team again won the Championship in the 
Merrimack Valley Conference as well as third place in the 
state and runner-up in New England. The Debate Team 
continued to distinguish itself in regional and state 
competition. 

Many of our students who are enrolled in the 
Performing Arts Program brought honors to themselves 
and the School by being selected to perform in district 
and state concerts. Our Orchestral Program continues to 
grow in quantity and in quality. 

The students presented an outstanding production 
"Fiddler on the Roof which played to "standing room 
only" crowds and earned the plaudits of all who attended. 

The American Field Service Program continued by 
placing one of our students for the summer program in 
Greece while we hosted a student from Sweden and one 
from Germany during the last school year. The Domestic 
Program hosted a student from Wisconsin and one of our 
students went to Minnesota and another to Maryland. 

The Chelmsford High School Community was honored 
by being cited by the IAA Basketball Officials of Greater 
Lowell for "the highest degree of sportsmanship character 
and ethics among its players, coaches and spectators in 
the conduct of its basketball programs." 

The student body once again responded admirably 
when the Spring and Fall blood drives were held. Over 
two-hundred (200) pints of blood were realized from 
these drives. 



84 



The High School Faculty presented the play "Arsenic 
and Old Lace" with all proceeds donated to the Town 
of Chelmsford Scholarship Fund. 

FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR OF 
GUIDANCE 

Following are pertinent facts and figures on the past 
graduating class. Also included is an addenum to the 
Chelmsford High School statistics which includes figures 
on Chelmsford residents who graduated from Nashoba 
Tech; the combined figures provide and overview of 
Chelmsford public school graduates. 

Seventy-two percent of the Chelmsford High graduating 
class indicated they would be continuing their education. 
This is almost identical to the 71% of the previous year. 
The only significant change in overall statistics was in the 
number of "undecided" which drOpped from 4.1% to 
1.6% 

SURVEY - CHELMSFORD HIGH SCHOOL 
CLASS OF 1977 

Boys Girls Totals % 

4 year private college or out-of-state 

•including Nursing - 1 girl 69 *67 136 

4 year Mass. State Colleges/Universities 



PLANS OF TOP RANKING 50 STUDENTS 
CLASS OF 1977 



Total Class 271 338 609 IOC 

ALL CHELMSFORD PUBLIC SECONDARY 

STUDENTS, CHELMSFORD HIGH AND NASHOBA 

REGIONAL TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 



Chelmsford High Seniors 
Nashoba (Chelmsford Seniors) 



'including Nursing - 2 girls 


82 


•90 


172 




26 

27 


Sub-Totals - 4 year Colleges/Universities 


151 


157 


308 


50.6 


28 
29 


2 year private Jr. Colleges 










30 


•including Dental Hygiene - 1 girl 


*17 


•17 


22 




31 


2 year Mass. Community Colleges 


23 


48 


71 




32 


Sub-Totals - 2 year colleges 


28 


65 


93 


15.2 


33 


Other Post-Secondary: 










34 
35 
36 
37 


Registered Nursing 




6 


6 




Lie. Practical Nursing 




1 


1 




Technical Schools (e.g. Wentworth, 










non-degree Art, Hairdressing, etc. 


14 


7 


21 




38 
39 


Business Schools 


8 




8 




Prep Schools 


2 




2 




40 
41 


Sub Totals - other 


16 


22 


38 


6.2 


42 


Post-Secondary Totals 


195 


244 


439 


72.0 


43 
43 


Employment 


65 


86 


151 


24.6 


44 


Military 


8 


2 


10 


1.5 


45 


Marriage 




2 


2 


.3 


46 


Undecided 


3 


4 


7 


1.6 


47 



University of Lowell 
Williams College 
Clark University 
University of Pittsburg 
Merrimack College 
Boston University 
State College of NY 
Bates College 

University of Massachusetts 
Northeastern University 
University of Lowell 
Tufts University 
Clark University 
Fitchburg State College 
Syracuse University 
St. Anselm's College 
University of NH 
University of Massachusetts 
College of the Holy Cross 
University of Lowell 
Renssalaer Poly-Tech. 
University of Maine 
University of Lowell 
University of Michigan 
University of Massachusetts 
University of Lowell 
Northeastern University 
University of Vermont 
Boston College 
Boston College 
Holy Cross 
University of Lowell 
Middlesex C.C. 
University of Massachusetts 
University of Lowell 
Northeastern University 
Bates College 
University of Colorado 
University of Lowell 
University of Massachusetts 
University of Lowell 
Stockbridge 
Hollistonjr. College 
University of Massachusetts 
University of Lowell 
Northern Essex C.C. 
Merrimack College 
Bates College 
Worcester Poly-Tech. 
University of Lowell 



Major 

Nursing 

Foreign Language 

Chemistry 

Pre Med 

Biology 

Pre- Med 

Dance-Ballet 

Chemistry 

Science 

Physical Therapy 

English 

Pre-Med 

Foreign Language 

Elementary Ed. 

Theater Tech. Lighting 

Biology 

Chemical Eng. 

Biology 

Economics/ Acct . 

Engineering 

Chemical Eng. 

Biology 

Biology 

Biology/ Geology 

Liberal Arts 

Pre-Med 

Journalism 

Biology 

Liberal Arts 

General Management 

Mathematics 

Biology 

Medical Technician 

Chemical Eng. 

Liberal Arts 

English 

Bio Chem 

Mathematics 

Chemical Eng. 

Journalism 

Mathematics 

Floriculture 

Animal Technician 

Nursing 

Elementary Ed. 

Secretarial Science 

Pre-Med 

Economics 

Electrical Eng. 

Art History 



SUMMARY OF CAREER PLANS OF 
50 TOP RANKING STUDENTS 



Chelmsford High Seniors 
Nashoba (Chelmsford Seniors) 



;al high 


b<_ 


HOOL 




Biology 


7 


Elementary Ed. 


2 


Physical Therapy 1 






Total 


others 


Pre Med 


5 


Journalism 


2 


Economics 1 


Total 
Post-Secondary 

439 


439 


(employment, 
military, etc.) 

170 = 609 
69 = 69 
239 = 678 


Chem. Engineering 
Liberal Arts 
Mathematics 
Nursing 
Chemistry 


4 
3 
3 
2 
2 


English 
Engineering 
Bio/Chem 
Bio/Geology 
Electrical Eng. 


2 


Economics/ Acct. 1 
Gen. Management 1 
Art History 1 
Secretarial Sci 1 
Animal Technician 1 


ages 








Foreign Language 


2 


Dance 




Floriculture 1 


.72 



.00 


.28 
combined 62.5% 


Med. Technician 


2 


Science 




Tech. Lighting 1 
(Theatre) 



85 



SCHOLASTIC APTITUDE TEST STATISTICS 







Verbal 


Math 


Number Tested 


1975 


CHS Seniors 


442 


487 


425 




Greater-Boston HS Seniors 


434 


469 


34,576 




Mass. HS Seniors 


434 


469 


56,878 




New England Seniors 


437 


471 


115,734 




Nation-wide 


434 


472 


996.391 


1976 


- CHS Seniors 


432 


478 


481 




Greater- Boston HS Seniors 


433 


470 


35,081 




Mass. HS Seniors 


432 


469 


57.892 




New England Seniors 


435 


472 


117.163 




Nation-wide 


431 


472 


999,829 


1977 


CHS Seniors 


435 


476 


461 




Greater- Boston HS Seniors 


432 


469 


34,195 




Mass. HS Seniors 


429 


465 


38,060 




New England Seniors 
Nation-wide 


432 
429 


468 
470 


116,185 
979,344 



WORK-STUDY - 1976-1977 

During the school year, one hundred fifteen students 
participated in the Word-Study Program. Fifteen of the 
Work-Study participants were under-classmen. A total of 
one hundred four students received school credit for their 
work experience. 

Twenty-one of the graduates indicated they would stay 
at their present jobs on a full-time basis. Another 
twenty -six indicated plans to enter college in September. 
Two entered military service, while the remainder were 
undecided about plans for the immediate future. 

During the year, approximately ninety to one hundred 
non-Work-Study placements were also made; these 
covered a wide variety of services. Well over four hundred 
visitations were made during the year to employers, 
either for a student evaluation or seeking the employer's 
cooperation in the program. 

The Work-Study Program continues to be very popular 
and beneficial to our students. As in past years, most of 
the employers are extremely satisfied with the skills, 
attitude, and job performance of Chelmsford High 
School students. 



CAREER AND COLLEGE COUNSELING CENTER 

The Career and College Counseling Center at the High 
School continues to attract large numbers of students. An 
on-going schedule of speakers representing schools, 
colleges and career topics held to hold interest high. 
Additionally, plans are under way to provide evening 
programs-a chance for parents to come in to see the 
Center and discuss relevant issues with a counselor. 

The Third Annual Career Day was held for area high 
schools at Billerica High School on November 2nd with 
approximately 500 Chelmsford 11th graders taking part; 
sixty speakers were on hand to stimulate interest in 
career exploration. 



The Annual College Day was held at St. Anslem's 
College in New Hampshire with 500 plus Chelmsford 
seniors taking part along with hundreds of other high 
school students from New Hampshire and Massachusetts. 
There were over 150 colleges represented. 

The Career Centers at the Junior High Schools have 
been expanded to include materials so students can use 
the center in groups or individually to learn about 
careers, jobs and interests. 

A new elective program was implemented for ninth 
grade students to experience career awareness. The 
students have the opportunity to assist in the operation 
of a large school building. 

Assemblies were held for eighth grade students to learn 
about the educational opportunities at Nashoba Valley 
Technical High School. A field trip to the school was held 
for them to see the shops in operation. 

FROM THE DIRECTOR OF 
SPECIAL EDUCATION 

The special education department continues to provide 
comprehensive services to students who have been 
determined to have special needs as defined in Chapter 
766, the Massachusetts comprehensive special education 
law of 1972. 

Any child between the ages of three through twenty- 
one years, eleven months old, who has had a core 
evaluation and has not obtained a high school diploma 
or its equivalent, and for whom it has been determined 
by the Administrator of Special Education to be in need 
of special education services, is considered a "special needs 
student." Approximately seven per cent of the total 
school population is currently in the special needs 
program. 

Although the enrollment in our regular education 
programs has been declining, enrollment in special 
education shows a tendency toward increasing, both in 
the number of students and in cost. These cost increases 
are reflected in the services which must be provided to 
those special needs students requiring them, as mandated 
in Chapter 766. 

In order to stem the rise of costs for services and 
programs, the Chelmsford Public Schools maintains its 
membership in the Merrimack Special Education Col- 
laborative. The collaborative assists in improving existing 
programs as well as in developing new programs which 
continue to serve the special needs students. 

Currently, a greater emphasis has been placed upon 
identifying and serving preschool children those aged 
three and four years old. This early identification and 
programming assists in the development and reinforce- 
ment of skills necessary for learning and/or, ultimately, 
school success. On the other end of the continuum, 
programs at the high school level have also been expanded 



86 



to provide greater opportunity for students to graduate 
and receive skill training beyond graduation. 

In September 1978, a Federally legislated special 
education law, known to us as Public Law 94-142, 
will be implemented. This law requires services to children 
between the ages of three through twenty one years. For 
the past four years, Chelmsford has been conscientiously 
implementing the more stringent regulations of the State 
special education law. Because of this, Chelmsford has 
been able to develop the procedures for evaluation and 
program implementation as mandated by Public Law 
94-142. 

It is gratifying to note that, after four years of imple- 
menting Chapter 766, the objectives of this law are being 
realized. In order for the students to receive maximum 
benefits from all services and programs, the special 
education department, fully supported by the Chelmsford 
School Committee, will continue to implement Chapter 
766 and the Federal special education law, 94-142. 

IN CONCLUSION 

Although there inevitably remain unmet needs and 
areas of concern, the accomplishments of our schools, 
through the cooperative efforts of community members 
and town departments, have been many and significant. 
The town's unanimity of purpose in striving to provide 
quality education for all students and the willingness 
of our townspeople and our families to work unstintingly 
towards this goal are most gratifying to the School 
Committee and school staff. 

Sincere thanks are once again extended to the town 
officials and boards, to the school personnel, to the 
Parent-Teacher Organizations, to advisory study com- 
mittees, school volunteer workers, and to the citizens 
for their cooperation and assistance this past year. 

The School Committee is most appreciative of the 
assistance rendered by the Chelmsford Jaycee-ettes when 
its members coordinated the efforts of local organizations 
and citizens in sponsoring the town-wide Pre-School 
Vision Screening Clinic on April 30, 1977. 

The School Committee wishes to promote increased 
citizen involvement in school task forces, advisory 
committees, and other volunteer services and to strengthen 
communications among members of the educational 
community. 

The future holds considerable challenge for everyone 
concerned with the quality of education. Schools cannot 
solve all the problems facing communities. There must 
be shared responsibilities with students, parents, ad- 
ministrators and town departments working together. 
With the commitment of Chelmsford school personnel, 
parents, students and citizens, one cannot help but feel 
a sense of confidence that Chelmsford can and will meet 
that challenge. The budget deliberations this year 
necessitated careful and thoughtful consideration of 



present and future programs, with constant concern for 
the taxpayers' burden. The budget recommended for the 
1978-1979 school year is contained in the Finance 
Committee's Annual Report. 

Special reference is made to the retirement of the 
following members of the staff. Their service remains 
esteemed in the hearts and minds of the many who knew 
them. 

Mrs. Martha Battles, Reading Teacher, Center School 

Mrs. Margaret Dotten, Secretary, School Administra- 
tion Office 

Mr. Christopher Burns, Custodian, High School 

In Memoriam--As we knew them in life, so shall we 
remember them. 
Mrs. Helen M. Lewis, Teacher Aide, Center School, 

July 18,1977 
Mrs. Nora F. Woods, Teacher Aide, Harrington 

School, October 20, 1977 
Mr. Oke R. Wikander, Custodian, South Row and 

McCarthy Schools, November 23, 1977 
Mrs. Frances Rondeau, Cafeteria, Center School, 

December 5, 1977 



NASHOBA VALLEY TECHNICAL 

HIGH SCHOOL 

Annual Town Report 

1977 was another year of productivity and progress, 
and students were involved in many programs throughout 
the district. In this year we again built a house for 
a district citizen, and this time it was in the town of 
Westford. Next years project will be built in the Town of 
Littleton. The customers are sleeted at a drawing during 
one of the School Committee meetings after adequate 
advertising and application. 

The restoration work at Westford Academy was 
continued this year. The Academy, when finished, will be 
a museum for the town of Westford. 

During the year much work was done to prepare 
specifications and plans for consolidating the programs at 
the main building. This would have brought students 
from rented quarters on Power Road, and a ranch house 
building on the school grounds into the main building. 
The original building was designed for 450 students, and 
through the effect of federal funding over the years we 
were able to broaden our course offerings, which resulted 
in an enrollment of more than 650 students. The 
additional students necessitated the use of rented 
quarters and ranch as mentioned above. Because of 
foresight on the part of the original school planners, 
the school has core facilities to accommodate an addition 
for the consolidation at a minimal cost. The package 
was finalized at $1,100.00 with a proposed one million 
dollar bond issue. The towns of Groton, Littleton and 



87 



Westford approved the bond issue, but the town of 
Chelmsford rejected it, which means we have to go 
through the process of notifiying the towns of the 
proposed indebtedness. The breakdown of the $1,100,000 
is as follows: 

$ 946,000 Construction 

53,000 Architectural Fee 
50,000 Equipment 
51,000 Contingency 

$1,100,000 

One of the new programs offered at the Tech this year 
was the "Bridge Program" for Special Needs students. 
This is a program where students with Special Needs are 
given their classroom work at their home schools, and 
then bussed to the Tech for skill training in a variety 
of shops. The program runs at the Tech from 3 p.m. 
to 5 p.m. daily, and the programs this year are Auto 
Body, Carpentry, Painting & Decorating, Culinary Arts, 
and Machine Shop. Last year we introduced a summer 
program to acquaint 7th and 8th graders with the type 
of programs available at the Tech, and because it's 
success, this program was again conducted this year. It 
was offered for the month of July from 8 a.m. to 12 noon. 
The following programs were available to these youngsters: 



Auto Body 
Automotive 
Drafting 
Electronics 

Graphic Communications 
Arts 



Machine 

Metal Fab 

Mill & House Carpentry 

Painting & Decorating 

Plumbing & Heating 



We again conducted the summer academic program 
for high school students of the four towns, and students 
of the Tech, primarily for make-up work, in the subjects 
of English, Social Studies, U.S. History, and Physical 
Education. 

The Adult Education Program continues to be very 
popular with district citizens, and this past year, as 
previously, was conducted from Monday through 
Thursday evening from 7 to 10 p.m., from October 
through April. The following courses were attended by 
district citizens: 



Antique Auto Body 
Auto Body 

Automotive Maintenance 

Automotive, Women 
Bookkeeping, Introductory 
Commercial Art 
Creative Crewel 
Data Processing 
Drafting 

Electrical Code and Theory 
Electrical Wiring 



High School Equivalency 
Home Painting & 

Decorating 
Home Renovation & 

Decorating 
Machine 

Ornamental Sheet Metal 
O.S.H.S. 

Physical Education, Men 
Physical Education, Women 
Photography, Introductory, 
Advanced, and Darkroom 
Plumbing Code and Theory 



Electronics 
Fencing 
Floral Design 
Gourmet Cooking 
Graphic Arts 
Health Assistant Aid 



Plumbing, Introductory 

School Bus Driving 

Small Gas Engine 

Typing 

Welding 

Woodworking 



The day programs remain the same and they are as 
follows: 



Auto Body 
Automotive 
Commercial Art 
Culinary Arts 
Data Processing 
Drafting 
Electrical 
Electronics 



Graphic Arts 

Health 

Machine 

Metal Fab 

Mill & House Carpentry 

Painting & Decorating 

Plumbing & Heating 



The number of graduates in the class of 1977 were 148, 
and they represented the towns as follows: 

69 Chelmsford 
17 Groton 
12 Littleton 
48 Westford 
2 Students were tuition students 

The placement of students in their trade and jobs were 

88%. 

The Committee Members representing the district 
during this year were: 

Stratos Dukakis, Chairman Chelmsford 
Augustine Kish, Vice-Chairman Littleton 

Jay Knox, Secretary Chelmsford 

Randolph Brumagim Chelmsford 

Louis Kelly Chelmsford 

Douglas Cox Littleton 

Jane Barry Groton 

Jordan Waugh Groton 

Charlotte Scott Westford 

Thomas Thorstensen Westford 

The Superintendent-Director of the school was Mr. 
Thomas Lafionatis of Westford, District Treasurer was 
Thomas St. Germain of Chelmsford, and District 
Counsel was Charles Zaroulis from Chelmsford. 

Submitted by the Nashoba Valley Technical High 
School District. 



88 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

I herein respectfully submit for your information and 
review, the Annual Report of the Police Department for 
the Fiscal Year 1977. 

At the present time the department is made up of 
48 permanent men. 

Chief of Police 

Robert E. Germann 

Captain 
James C . Greska 

Sergeants 

Leslie A. Adams Walter E. Edwards, Jr. 

ArmandJ. Caron Pennryn D. Fitts 

William R. McAllister Raymond McKeon 

Phillip N. Molleur 

Patrolmen 



Richard A. Adams 
Edgar L. Auger 
John J. Bell 
Mark L. Burlamachi 
Steve A. Burns 
John P. Campbell 
Lance Cunningham 
Patrick W. Daley 
Frederick G. Dillon 
John J. Donovan 
Kenneth R. Duane 
Blair J. Finnegan 
John E. Redican, Jr. 
Michael E. Rooney 
John B . Sousa 
Robert J. Trudel 
DanielJ. Walsh 
John O.Walsh 

Thomas A. 



Charles H. Hadley 

John G. Harrington 

Charles D. Harvey 

Edwin P. Hodgson 

James J. Kerrigan 

Ronald A. Leach 

Roland E. Linstad 

Russell H. Linstad 

John J. Mack, Jr. 

Raymond G. McCusker, Jr. 

Henry R. McEnany 

James Midgley 

Edward C. Rooney 

Richard A. Simpson 

William A. Strobel,Jr. 

Howard R. Ubele 

Eugene W. Walsh 

William R. Walsh 

Niemaszyk 



Intermittent Patrolmen 

LI oyd E. Butt Gary W. McCarthy 

Bruce A. Darwin Timmothy F. O'Connor 

Robert Popplewell Ernest R. Woessner, Jr. 



Police Matrons 



Grace Auger 
Mary Long 



Nora Clifford 
Emily Peake 



Permanent School Traffic Supervisors 

Grace Auger Karen Flynn 

Helen Chafe George Johnson 

Margaret Dillon Joan B. MacPhail 

Janet M. O'Connor Halvar Peterson 

Carol M. Souza Diane Zebny 

Alternate School Traffic Supervisors 

Estelle Abely Irene Corsetti 

Patricia Dearborn Loretta Weaver 



Secretary 

Louise A. Pigeon 

Secretary 

Nora F. Clifford 

Auxiliary Police Department 

The Chelmsford Auxiliary Police, during 1977, served 
the town on fifteen occasions. These included parades, 
band concerts, bide-a-thons, Elks Road Race, dog show 
and the epic snow emergency last May when teams 
augmented the Fire Department and Civil Defense with 
portable emergency generators assisting many citizens 
who were without electricity. 

The primary goal of property checks reached a high 
point with some 4,164 house checks made the first full 
year of year round operation. The cruiser was in use on 
115 nights covering 11,700 miles on patrol. The entire 
unit successfully completed the "Basic Responder" first 
aid course, thanks to American Ambulance, and CPR, 
thanks to Sergeant Pennryn Fitts Police Department 
CPR instructor. 

The work projects for 1977 included the changeover 
in cruisers from a 1971 Chevrolet to a 1976 Chevrolet, a 
major engine overhaul on the Emergency Van, and a 
trailer mounted 5 KW generator to augment the Fire 
Department Unit. 

Total man hours for 1977 was 6,985 broken down into 
3,300 duty hours, 2,500 training hours, and 1,185 hours 
on work projects. 

During the year both the Deputy, John Daughraty, 
and the Senior Captain, Clifford Varnum, passed away. 
Both men will be long remembered for their dedication 
to the auxiliary and the town. 

Director - Sergeant Walter W. Edwards, Jr. 
Coordinator - Sergeant Basil Larkin (Ret.) 



Roster 



Emil Aberizk 


William Keenan 


William Arsenault 


Leland Kelly 


Robert Abreu 


Costas Kevghas 


Loyd Anstey 


Bob Loyd 


George Brown 


Richard Meaney 


Kenneth Berger 


Frederic Mehan 


Craig Brigham 


Edward Norton 


Paul Dean 


Bruce Pemberton 


Douglas Drobnis 


Thomas Peterson 


Leroy Fielding 


James Quinn 


Leo Flanagan 


David Ramsay 


Roger Gregoire 


Nicholas Stratis 


John Hartnett 


paul Villare 


Arrests 




Crimes Against Person 


79 


Crimes Against Property 


56 


Crimes Against Public Order 


1535 



89 



Disposition of Cases in 1977 

Fined 718 

Placed on Probation 36 

Suspended Sentence and Placed on Probation 4 

Placed on File 102 

Not Guilty Finding 1 5 

Dismissed with Probable Cause for Arrest 46 
Ordered to Pay Court Costs and Continued w/o Finding 7 1 

Committed to Youth Service Board 2 

Committed to M . C . I . Walpole 3 

Committed to M . C . I . Concord 2 

Committed to M.C.I. Billerica 2 
Turned over to out of town Police Dept's and Courts 109 

Cases Continued without a finding 29 

Placed on Alcohol Safety Program 83 

Ordered to Pay Restitution 25 

Deferred Sentences 3 

Cases Pending and Continued in the Courts 420 



MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS 

1976 1977 

Calls Answered by Cruisers .. . 12,361 12,732 

Summons Served 1,353 1,265 

Licenses Suspended 75 42 

Accidents Reported 1,133 1,269 

Personal Injuries Reported . . 347 331 

Fatal Accidents 7 4 

Mileage of Cruisers 511,282 481,072 

Special Property Checks 3,477 4,164 

Station Lockups 888 1,017 

Citations Issued 1,953 1,478 

Parking Violations 366 854 

Doors and Windows 

found open 306 194 

Detoxification Unit 507 400 

RECEIPTS TURNED OVER TO THE TOWN 

1976 1977 

Photocopying Machine $2,498.00 $2,742.00 

Firearm Permits 794.00 844.00 

Bicycle Registrations 25.75 22.75 

Firearm Indentification Cards. 660.00 544.00 

Court Fines 2,857.00 1 ,858.55 

Photographs 148.00 162.00 

Police Detail Account 

Service Charge 4,202.00 4,627.46 

Education and Training are still very important within 
our department. At this time we have men attending the 
following. 

Northeaster University 5 Men 

Middlesex Community College 2 Men 

Lowell University 1 Man 

Northern Essex 1 Man 



Other Training Courses that our men attended in 1977 

N.E.M.L.E.C. Police Academy 4 Men 

F.B.I. Uniform Crime Reporting School 3 Men 

Rape Seminar and Workshop 3 Men 

Arson Investigating 1 Man 

Police Shotgun Training School 5 Men 

American Heart Assoc. C.P.R. Course 48 Men 

Homicide Investigation School 1 Man 

Assaults 96 

Run-a-ways 91 

Stolen Motor Vehicles 159 

Burglary 387 

Vandalism 536 

Larceny 770 

Murder 

Rape 2 

Arson 12 

Robbery 9 

Morals 40 

Narcotics 53 



This year we have had two men retire from the Police 
Department, Captain Richard Campbell retired after 
more than 21 years as a permanent full time Police 
Officer, and Officer Barnard George retired after more 
than 17 years as a permanent full time Police Officer. 

Due to the retirement of Captain Campbell the 
position of Captain became vacant. The Board of 
Selectmen then interviewed all the Sergeants from the 
Police Department for this position. Sergeant James 
Greska was given the temporary position of Captain. Also 
to replace Sergeant Greska, Officer Philip Molleur was 
given the position of temporary Sergeant. 

Sometime in early 1978 the Massachusetts Division of 
Personnel Administration will conduct a written ex- 
amination for the position of Deputy Police Chief Town 
Town of Chelmsford. Once the Deputy Police Chief is 
selected the position of Captain will be abolished. 

At the Annual Town Meeting in 1977 an article 
was passed calling for an Evaluation of the Police 
Department. The Company selected to do this is Robert 
Sheehan Associates. Mr. Sheehan has been with the 
Police Department since November. He has been riding 
and working alongside all members of the department. 

This year, 1977, while patrolling the highways and 
roadways of our town, the mobile units covered 481,072 
miles in our cruisers. 

At this time we would like to express our thanks and 
appreciation to the Bournival Plymouth Company of 
Lowell for the donation of our safety car. Our Safety 
Department is very active and very important to us. 



90 



In conlusion, I would like to offer my sincere 
appreciation and thanks to the various officials and 
department heads, the Captain, the Sergeants, the 
Patrolmen and the citizens of the town for their continued 
help and co-operation. Because of their combined efforts 
I am sure Chelmsford is a safer place in which to work 
and live. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert E. Germann 
Chief of Police 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

The following is a report of the Highway Department 
for the year 1977: 





No. Reg. H'way 


No. Reg. Waste 


Year 


Employees 


Col. Employees 


1955 


21 


3 


1966 


27 


13 


1977 


37 


16 



The following streets were accepted at the Annual 
Town Meeting: 

Ideal Ave., Ext. 

Lisa Lane 

Piccadilly Circle 

Baldwin Road 

Brush Hill Road 

Sprin Clean Up Days were conducted during the week 
of May 2 through May 6, and Fall Clean Up Days were 
conducted during the week of October 17 through 
October 21. 

Drainage projects include the following: 
Middlesex Street - 120 feet 8" pipe replaced, 1 manhole 

installed. 
Graniteville Road - 83 feet 10" corrugated pipe, 2 catch 

basins installed. 
Dustable Road - 197 feet 12" R.C. Pipe, 37 ft. 12" coated 

and paved pipe, 3 catch basins installed. 
Hornbeam Hill Road - 55 feet 24" coated and paved pipe 

installed. 
Empire & Vincent Streets - 40 feet 12" corrugated pipe, 1 

catch basin installed. 

Under Chapter 825, Acts of 1974, six (6) drainage 
projects have been designed by the consulting engineers, 
F.mmons, Fleming & Bienvenu, Inc. and awarded to 
contractors for construction. 
Coolidge Street - Completed 
North Road at Linwood Street - 90% complete 
Janet Road • 80% complete 
Swain Road - 50% complete 

Dunstable Road - Work scheduled to begin in the Spring 
High Street • Work scheduled to begin in the Spring 



Under Chapter 1140, Acts of 1973, Fletcher Street, 
from North Road to Chelmsford Street was completely 
rebuilt, all drainage was updated and the street widened 
to install a five (5) foot sidewalk to accomodate 
pedestrian traffic. 

The Chapter 90 Construction project was continued on 
Acton Road. Drainage structures were adjusted to line 
and grade on Acton Road from Elm Street to 
approximately 100 feet beyond Purcell Drive. A top 
course of bituminous concrete was placed over the 
binder. Bituminous concrete berm was placed on both 
sides of the roadway. The shoulders of the roadway were 
graded and the sidewalk area was prepared with a gravel 
base. A bituminous concrete sidewalk will be installed 
along this area in the Spring. 

New equipment approved for the Highway Department 
are as follows: Two (2) Dump Trucks, Two (2) Sander 
Bodies, Two (2) Snow Plows, One (1) Sidewalk Snow 
Plow Tractor, Two (2) Truck Chassis and Two (2) Non 
Packer Type Bodies for recycling. 

The usual oiling of streets, including mix-in-places, 
brush cutting, fabricating, replacing and installing street 
signs, painting traffic lines, cleaning catch basins, 
rebuilding and repairing sunken catch basins, sanding, 
snow plowing and snow removal, sweeping streets, 
drainage and general maintenance was performed 
throughout the year. Many weeks were spent picking up 
brush caused by the May 9th snow storm. 

I wish to thank the townspeople for their kind 
consideration and cooperation and the Police 
Department for notifying the department of dangerous 
road conditions during the winter months. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Louis Rondeau 
Supt. of Streets 



91 



CIVIL DEFENSE COMMITTEE 

Walter R. Hedlun, Director 
George J Brown William W. Edge 

Melvin P. Dejager Walter W. Edwards 

George R. Dixon Joseph E. Stavely 

The Office of Emergency Preparedness Civil Defense 
Committee, has been meeting regularly the second 
Tuesday of each month, all necessary papers for the State 
and Federal Civil Defense and Office of Emergency 
Preparedness have been completed, making the town 
eligible for Surplus Property at the Taunton Surplus 
Property Depot. 

The communications Center has participated in the 
monthly drills with Mass. C. D. Headquarters, Area 1 in 
Tewksbury and other cities and towns Emergency 
Operating Centers. 

The Town Emergency Operating Center in Town Hall, 
was activated May 9th. following a State of Emergency 
declared by the Board of Selectmen, following a heavy 
spring snow storm, all department heads and personnel 
are to be complimented for their excellent response and 
cooperation, during the two week period of the Emergency, 
much assistance and help was given in technical advice 
and help from Mass. and Area C. D. Agencies, also 
assistance from the Mass. National Guard in opening of 
roadways of fallen trees and wires. 

The Auxiliary Police have been very active this past 
year, assisting with electrical generators during the State 
of Emergency, the Vacation House Check Program now 
on a year round basis, assisting at the various Celebrations 
in the Town. 

We wish to thank the Board of Selectmen, the 
Administration Assistant, all departments and personel 
in the town for their cooperation received this past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walter R. Hedlun, Director 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

I hereby submit my report of the Fire Department for 
the year ending December 31, 1977. The surprise snow 
storm in May caused considerable problems for the fire 
service by "knocking out" all fire alarm circuits and 
downing several miles of fire alarm wire. It was also 
necessary to provide fire companies at the burning site 
on Crooked Spring Road every day for a two month 
period. 

There has been a 90% drop in arson involving 
automobiles from 1976-1977. 

The Fire Department recommends before installing a 
wood burning stove that you contact the fire department 
and obtain a pamphlet, free of charge, pertaining to 
their installation. 



With the funds appropriated at the Annual Town 
Meeting, we have repowered the Ladder Truck with a 
new diesel engine, giving it a 15 year life expectancy. 
This year we are requesting a new car the present 
one being a 1973. 

I wish to express my thanks to all town officials and 
employees for the excellent cooperation given to the fire 
department during the past year and again I would like 
to congratulate and thank the men of the department 
for continuing to maintain the high standard of courage 
and ability that has been shown in the past. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frederick H. Reid, Fire Chief 

Fire Chief 

Frederick H. Reid 

Deputy Fire Chief 

Edward G. Ojiinn 

Captains 

Allen C. Mello James M. Spinney 

Charles S. Galloway, Jr. RonaldJ. Sawicki 

Ronald O. Wikander William H. Thayer- Retired 6/30/77 

Secretary 

Mary Ann Koulas 

Fire Fighters 

Robert L. Hughes 

Thomas J. Curran 

James P. Flaherty 

Joseph F. Lynch 

Paul D. Hayes 

Terrance A. Goode 

William H. Hadley 

Leo A. Martin 

Emil P. Magiera 

Philip Dube 

Joseph E. Staveley 

John P. DePalma 

Walter F. Adley, Jr. 

Dennis Vargeletis 

Richard L. Grenon 

Ronald L. Johnson 

Wallace V. Maybury, Jr. 

William V. Cady, Jr. 

James A. Sousa 

Daniel T. Reid 

Michael McTeague 

James P. Curran 

Peter C. Johnson 

Edward J. Nolet 

Michael D. Ridson 

Raymond R. Kydd 

William Dalton 

David Gelineau 



Thomas P. Miskell 
Arthur G. Anderson 
Bertrand E. Dixon, Jr. 
Charles Ferreira 
Robert K. Adams 
Alvin F. Wetmore 
Jack D. Hadley 
Harvey M . Miller 
Robert A. Bennett 
Robert R. Gagnon 
Harold J. Pierce, Jr. 
Donald A. Weber 
Paul D. Henderson 
Peter T. Wetherbee 
Francis J. Conlin 
Donald A. Drew 
James T. Cutter 
Gerald D. Tonks 
Richard P. O'Neil 
William F. Curran 
Joseph J. Spinazola 
Ernest J. Frobese 
Charles A. Schramm 
William M. Burke, Jr. 
Michael F. Curran 
William H. Jamer 
James Doermeester 
Thomas D. Miskell 



Mechanic 

Jack Smith 



92 



CALLS FOR ASSISTANCE IN 1977 





it 


V 


s 


< 


§ 


3 


i — > 


-* 

< 


1/2 


O 


Z 


Q 


H 


Vehicular Accidents 


3 


4 


3 


3 


2 


5 


3 


3 


1 


1 


7 


6 


41 


Brush 








10 


103 


41 


20 


25 


4 


5 


12 


13 


3 


236 


Building 


10 


9 


13 


3 


13 


3 


12 


9 


10 


10 


9 


18 


119 


Dump 











1 


2 


1 




















4 


False-Malicious 


4 


7 


3 


6 


8 


5 


4 


4 


4 


6 


4 


4 


59 


False- Accidental 


6 


2 


3 


2 


4 


4 


2 


2 


1 


3 


3 





32 


Misc. 


16 


19 


46 


30 


43 


28 


22 


21 


16 


17 


21 


30 


309 


Lock Out 


2 


2 


2 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


17 


Medical Assistance 


25 


15 


17 


8 


25 


12 


27 


22 


16 


13 


18 


13 


211 


Vehicle 


9 


5 


8 


12 


12 


8 


5 


16 


6 


6 


8 


8 


103 


Mutual Aid 


1 


1 


3 


3 


4 


2 


2 





2 





2 


2 


22 



Total 



76 



64 



108 



172 



155 



90 



103 



82 



62 



70 



86 



85 



1153 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Board of Health 

Peter Dulchinos, Chairman 
Paul F. McCarthy PaulJ. Caniff, D.D.S. 

Health Department Personnel 

Director of Public Health Senior Clerk 

Thomas W. Morris, R.S. Gladys K. Assaly 

Board of Health Physician 

Michael A. Guilchrist, M.D. 

Water Pollution Control 

In 1977 the water pollution control program continued 
its effort to clean up the streams. Director made 9 Court 
appearances relative to violations. The Board performed 
94 dye tests. Septic System permits issued (new) 97. Septic 
System permits issued (repair) 119. Four inspections were 
made of Nursing Homes. Twenty-one inspections made 
for Article 2 Housing. School inspections 8. Complaints 
received and checked, 261. Stable inspections, 7. Day 
Care Centers inspected, 4. Camp Paul inspected. Bathing 
beaches, 10 inspections and water samples. Streams tested 
for caliform, 52. Certify International Travel Vaccination 
Books, 47. Restaurants, 62. 

Administration and Management 

Income for various services and permits is listed below: 

Percolation tests -73 $1,095.00 
Sewage Permits - 216 2 , 1 60 . 00 

Miscellaneous licenses & fees 5,302.00 

Amount received for 1977 8,557.00 

Rabies Clinic 



Administered by Martin Gruber, D.V.M. 
446 dogs were innoculated against rabies. 



a total of 



Public Health 

Communicable Disease Program 

Part of the duties of the public & health nurse include 
follow-up on certain reportable diseases as mandated by 
the Mass. Department of Public Health. An epidemiologic 
investigation is undertaken by the town nurse and the 
report is submitted to Department of Public Health. 
Reports on the following diseases were completed during 
1977. 

Tuberculosis 2 new active cases 

Hepatitis 9 reports 

Meningitis 2 reports 

Salmonella 1 report 

The testing of persons exposed to active tuberculosis 
and those persons whose employment require cer- 
tification of freedom from that disease is another 
responsibility of the town nurse. One hundred and twenty 
tests were given to the town residents. Home visits are 
made to families with active tuberculosis on a periodic 
basis to insure understanding of the illness and that 
adquate medical follow-up is achieved. 

Maternal Child Health Services 

Home visits are made to families with newborns and 
premature infants by physician referral. Visits are made 
for health supervision, education and referral when 
indicated. There were twenty-eight visits made to families 
under this program, and referrals were made to Crippled 
Children's Program, Headstart, Solomon Mental Health, 
and Congenital Anomalies Clinic. 

Immunization Program (Preschool and School) 

The Board of Health offered four immunization Clinics 
this year. Lead testing was also offered at these clinics. 
Fourty children were served at these clinics. The town 



93 



nurse also assists the school nurses at clinics for school 
age children. Because of the change in the recommen- 
dation by the State for the age at which to administer 
the Measles vaccine, the school clinics were very busy this 
year. There were over two thousand children immunized 
at these clinics. 

The Immunization Program 

The Board of Health sponsored two Flu Clinics this 
year. The vaccine was offered to elderly and chronically 
ill persons as recommended by Mass. Department of 
Public Health. Four hundred persons were immunized. 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

This year has seen an upturn in building activity, 
reversing last year's trend. 

There were 370 permits issued in 1977 as compared 
with 297 in 1976. Permits for new dwellings, including 
condominium units, were almost double 1976 figures. 
The breakdown is as follows; 141 new dwellings, 16 
remodel alterations, 125 additions, 33 pools, 26 
commercial permits or signs, and 27 miscellaneous ( 1 
permit was voided). 



The retirement of Chairman Claude A. Harvey after 
28 years as an assessor brought major changes in the 
composition of the Board. Julian Zabierek was appointed 
to fill the vacancy until the 1978 town election and Janet 
Lombard was elected chairman and full time assessor by 
the other members of the Board. We miss Claude but 
welcome Julian. 

The annual assessors school at the University of 
Massachusetts was attneded by both Mrs. Delaney and 
Miss Lombard, where Mrs. Delaney took a course on 
principles of assessing and Miss Lombard taught a 
specialty course on computer assisted appraisal 
techniques. Miss Lombard has continued on as Chairman 
of the Computer Committee of the Association of 
Massachusetts Assessors and also served as co-chairman of 
the Education Committee of the Middlesex County 
Assessors Association. 

Although there was an increase of $4,738,710 in the 
total value of the property in the community, there was 
approximately a 30% increase in the tax rate this year. 
The following summary was included with the tax bills in 
an effort to explaing the unexpected jump, the major 
part of which resulted from a school audit and the 
ensuing decrease in state reimbursements to the town. 



Budget 

Tax Title Exp. 

Court Judgement 

Cherry Sheet Offsets 

County Tax 

County Hospital 

Misc. State Charges 

Overlay /Abatements 

State Underassessments 

Gross Amount to be Raised 



DEBITS 
(Total Cost to Run the Town) 
Fiscal 
1977 

$21,055,350.34 

6,500.00 

5,171.48 

54,941.87 

530,320.28 

6,363.84 

193,343.43 

241,731.18 

1,387.04 



Fiscal 
1978 

$22,119,797.24 

5,000.00 



58,447.88 

607,775.58 

8,166.90 

165,019.22 

230,170.78 

72,937.99 



$22,095,109.46 



$23,267,315.59 



Difference 

$1,064,446.90 

1,500.00 

5,171.48 

3,506.01 

77,455.30 

1,803.06 

28,324.21 

11,560.40 

71,550.95 

$1,172,206.13 
(Impact: $4.30 on Tax Rate) 



94 



Cherry Street 



CREDITS 
Total Receipts From All Sources Other Than Tax Levy 
Fiscal Fiscal 

1977 1978 

$ 6,367,880.87 $ 4,792,886.21 



School Trans. $304,000.00 
School Constr. 69,000.00 
Chapter 766 416,000.00 
School Aid 463,000.00 

Schools 

Audit Adj. 688,892.41 

Local Aid 365,897.75 

State Over Assessments 

Local Est, Receipts 

Transfers, Avail Funds 

Available Funds to Reduce Rates 



79,908,14 

1,577,518.01 

812,432.54 

878,083.00 

$ 9,715,822.55 



24,348.87 

1,370,514.00 

835,454.93 



$ 7,023,204.01 

(Impact: 



Difference 

$1,574,994.66 
(see detail) 



$9.95 



55,559.27 

207,004.00 

23,022.39 

878,083.00 

$2,692,618.54 

On Tax Rate) 



Net Amount To Be Raised 

Fiscal Fiscal 

1977 1978 

$12,379,286.91 $16,244,111.58 



Up $3,864,824.76 



M. V. Excise Levy of 77 

Abatements Levy of 77 
M.V. Excise Levy of 76 

Abatements Levy of 76 
Real Estate Tax 
R.E. Omitted Assessment 
No. of Dwellings 
Personal Property Tax 
Excise Abatements 

Levy of 74 
Levy of 75 

Statutory Exemptions 
Type 

Clause 41 (Elderly) 

Clause 22 (Veterans) 

Clause 37 (Blind) 

Clause 17,18 (Age, Infirmity, Financial Condition) 

Clause 41 A Tax Deferrals 

R.E. Abatements (Over Value, Erroneous, Etc.) 



No Issued 


25,290 


Total Tax 


$ 1,332,583.14 


No Granted 


3,244 


Total Abated 


108,635.13 


No Issued 


3,184 


Total Tax 


114,110.77 


No Granted 


1,037 


Total Abated 


23,416.92 


No Issued 


9,755 


Total Tax 


15,632,611.98 


No Issuec 


7 


Total Tax 


29,951.35 


8700 








No Issued 


792 


Total Tax 


611,499.60 


No Granted 


512 


Total Abated 


19,730.96 


No Granted 


37 


Total Abated 


1,681.88 


No. 




Total Abated 




212 




$73,690.14 




526 




97,06?. 80 




15 




6,562.50 




63 




23,487.81 




6 




8,277.70 




101 




48,679.05 





95 



DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS' 
SERVICES 

The volume of work in the department as well as the 
case load has increased considerably during 1977. The 
illness of veterans, their spouses and high employment 
have been contributing factors in the high cost of 
Veterans' Benefits for the year. 

VETERANS' BENEFITS 
For the period of January 1, 1977 through December 
31, 1977 the department handled a total of 1100 cases. 

CASH AND MATERIAL GRANTS ACCOUNT 

Month Expended 

January $ 7,350.50 

February 7,437.82 

March 4,866.50 

April 4,626.87 

May 9,624.84 

June 4,795.19 

July 5,935.21 

August 5,467.62 

September 5,368.73 

October 5,424.03 

November 6,063.61 

December 6,138.26 



Total: 



$73,100.18 



VETERANS SERVICES 
In addition to the administration of State Veterans' 
Benefits, this department also renders federal assistance 
through the Veterans Administration to the veterans, 
their widows and their dependents. In the past year many 
recipients have filed for pensions, disabilities, school aid, 
etc. An accounting is kept on all benefits derived from 
other sources. 



Veterans who needed hospitalization: 




To: Bedford V. A. Hospital 


52 


Brockton 


22 


Jamaica Plain 


20 


West Roxbury 


12 




106 


**Veterans Administration 


$ 99,522.00 


Social Security 


65,000.00 



$164,522.00 
**We had excellent results in filing for widows 
pensions and disability claims from the Veterans Ad- 
ministration during 1977. 

The department works in conjunction with the Social 
Security office and the Welfare Departments to obtain 
benefits for our recipients who are eligible. This reduces 
the amount of benefits which the town must pay to 
individual cases. 

I wish to acknowledge the cooperation that we receive 
from the Commissioner of Veterans' Services and his staff 



and the Veterans Administration Regional Office in 
Boston. Only through their assistance are we able to 
give our veterans and their dependents the services and 
aid they are eligible to receive. 

To the various departments and agencies that assist 
us through the year, our most sincere thanks and 
gratitude. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mary K. McAuliffe 
Veterans' Agent 

VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND 
COMMITTEE 

The Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee received 
one application for assistance through the Veterans' 
Agent. A meeting was held during October and a majority 
of the committee members were present. After a detailed 
report of the applicant's request, it was voted to approve 
the payment for assistance in the amount of $250.00 
The payment was made to a local fuel oil dealer to 
assist the family with an overdue heating bill. The 
applicant, a World War II Veteran, had been ill for 
several months and was unable to work during that 
period of time. Aid is always given in the form of 
material grants such as medical care, fuel, utility bills 
and clothing. The present limit of aid is $250.00 per 
veteran per year. 

During 1977 the committee voted to change a portion 
Veterans of World War II are reminded that all 
applications are first reviewed by the town Veterans' 
Agent to determine if the town can assist under the 
Veterans' Benefits Program. In the event that furhter 
needs are established, the application is forwarded to 
this committee for consideration. 

During 1977 the committee voted to change a portion 
of its investment from Paid-Up Shares to a Savings 
Term Certificate at a local bank so that the invested 
funds would earn a higher rate of interest. This change 
took place on October 11, 1977. The new certificate 
will earn at the rate of six and three quarter per cent 
per annually with daily compounding. 

Applicants may wish to forward requests to their 
precinct Member of the Committee. We list the names of 
each member as follows: 



Precinct 


1 


Dr. Albert W. Willis 


Precinct 


2 


Victor W. Fetro 


Precinct 


3 


JamesJ. Walker 


Precinct 


4 


JohnJ. McNulty 


Precinct 


5 


George F. Waite 


Precinct 


6 


Alfred H. Coburn 


Precinct 


7 


Thomas A. Ennis 


Precinct 


8 


Dr. Kenneth A. Cooke 


Precinct 


9 


Peter J. Saulis 


Precinct 


10 


Melvin P. dejager 



96 



Precinct 11: Herbert T. Knutsen 
Precinct 12: Gerard A. Vayo 

The fund did increase its assets in the amount of 
$116.51 for the year 1977 even after assistance to an 
applicant. A complete financial statement appears 
elsewhere in this Annual Town Report. 

Respectfully yours, 

TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 
VETERANS EMERGENCY FUND COMMITTEE.by 

Alfred H. Coburn 
Chairman 

VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND 

Treasurer's Report to the Board of Selectmen 
January 1st, 1977, to December 3 1 , 1977. 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

Balance on Hand as of January 1, 1977: $6,682.90 

Add Receipts: 

The Central Savings Bank, Lowell, Mass. 

Interest $222.83 

Commonwealth Federal Savings & Loan Association 
of Lowell, Mass., formerly known as First Federal 
Savings & Loan Association. 

Dividends 143.68 

Total Receipts $ 366.51 

Total of Balance on Hand as of January 1, 1977 and 
Receipts $7,049.41 

Deduct Disbursements $ 250.00 

Balance on Hand as of December 31, 1977: ...$6,799.41 



ASSETS 

Central Savings Bank, Lowell, Mass. 

On Deposit, Bank Book Number 128790: . . . $4,199.41 

Commonwealth Federal Savings & Loan Association, 
Lowell, Mass., formerly known as First Federal 
Savings and Loan Association: 
Savings Term Certificate, Account Number 
901,035-01 .$2,600.00 

Total Assests: $6,799.41 

LIABILITIES 

Total Liabilities None 

Total Assests, Less Liabilities: $6,799.41 

Respectfully yours, 

Town of Chelmsford, 

Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee 

Alfred H. Coburn 
Treasurer 



BOARD OF APPEALS 

Chairman: Marshall Arkin 
Vice Chairman: Robert Kydd 

Charles Higgins Alternates 

S. Robert Monaco Joe Dappel 

Carolyn Bennett Daniel Burke 

Florence Kelly 

The Board held 71 hearings for Special Permits/ 
Variances for the year 1977. They were disposed of as 
follows: 



Granted 

Denied 

Withdrawn 



48 

18 

5 



The Board would like to take this opportunity to thank 
the Town employees and elected officials for their 
co-operation in this past year. 

Respectfully submitted 

Marshall Arkin 
Chairman 

PUBLIC LIBRARIES 

Adams Library, Boston Road, Chelmsford Center 
Anna C. MacKay Memorial Library 
Newfield Street, North Chelmsford 



Library Trustees 



Howard K. Moore, Chairman 
James Geary 
Elizabeth McCarthy 



Dennis McHugh 

Mary Claire Phelan 

Roger Welch 



After a short respite planning began again in 1977 to 
add needed space to the library complex. In the face of 
an austerity minded town budget the Trustees decided 
not to request 1977 town funds for the renovation of the 
Carriage House (The structure on the Boston Road end 
of the Children's House property). However this did not 
indicate a lack of interest in a multi-purpose meeting 
and programming area, for the Trustees committed 
Trust funds to supplement contributions from the Friends 
of the Library and donations from the public at large 
solicated by the Carriage House Committee. Work is 
expected to be completed within the coming year. 

At a time when many area libraries are experiencing 
business declines from 1974-75 peaks, the Adams and 
McKay libraries showed circulation increases of 6.5%, 
or 15,868 items, the largest jump in eight years. This also 
marked the first year in which the library's annual 
circulation exceeded 8 per capita. Of course, we were 
busy in other areas as well: the adult Reference 
department at the Adams alone answered more than 
10,500 Reference questions, 20% of them over the 
telephone; major additions were made to our legal 
Reference collection with the addition of the U.S. Federal 
Code and American Jurisprudence; a grant for over 
$11,000 worth of video equipment and personnel was 



97 



received from the Library Service and Construction Act 
and the Massachusetts Foundation for the Arts and 
Humanities; we inaugurated a Center for Travel In- 
formation; and we published the 4th edition of our 
Handbook of Chelmsford Organizations. In the Children's 
area, the Summer Reading program at Adams and 
MacKay attracted a record enrollment of 500 in 1977, 
while programs at both libraries were attended by over 
3,800 children. A grant for learning toys was received 
through the Merrimack Education Center. When cat- 
alogued this major collection will be housed at MacKay. 
Other highlights included the "Pie in the Eye Review", 
three "Little Red Wagon" presentations, a heavily 
attended Haunted House at the Carriage House and a 
'Design a Bookmark' contest which drew hundreds of 
creative entries from both libraries. 

Outside as well as inside the buildings good things 
were happening. Through the attention and efforts of 
our redoubtable maintenance crew, and the generosity of 
local nursery persons, the grounds were awash with color 
from Spring through Fall, the flowers lending more of a 
park-like atmosphere to the premises than has been seen 
in recent times. In the area of personnel, Susan Foote, 
Assistant Librarian since September of 1973, left for a 
position with the Pelham (N.H.) school department, and 
staff member Ron Latham moved to the directorship of 
the Athol Public Library. We are fortunate again this 
year to have had the services of an extraordinarily faithful 
and talented group of volunteers to complement our 
regular staff. These people, along with the Friends of the 
Library and an energetic Board of Trustees, enable us to 
provide the level of service described above at a more 
economical rate than any other library, but one, of the 39 
libraries in our class in Massachusetts. 

STATISTICAL REPORT 

Monies deposited with Town Treasurer 17,038.38 (+ 2%) 
Circulation 261,922 ( + 6.5%) 

New Card Issued 2,440 (+ 2%) 

Respectflly submitted, 

DavidJ. Panciera 
Director 



CEMETERY COMMISSION 

Arthur J. Colmer 

Gerald L. Hardy Everett V. Olsen 

George E. Baxendale 

We the Commissioners are pleased to announce some 
of our accomplishments this past year. 

Fairview Cemetery in North Chelmsford, has had three 
acres of land completed into Cemetery Lots. We have 
planted trees and shrubs to help beautify this Cemetery. 
Roads have been hot topped and new water lines 
have been installed. 



In the West Chelmsford Cemetery we have developed 
an acre of land into Cemetery Lots. 

new Gates have been made for West Chelmsford 
entrance by Cemetery personnel. Fences have been 
repaired and painted. 

Heart Pond Cemetery fence was painted and kept in 
repair. 

All other Cemeteries were limed and fertilized and kept 
in repair. 

All Cemeteries have seen extensive tree pruning due 
to storms we have had this past year. 

We have had 112 interments this past year: 
Pine Ridge 



Fairview 
Riverside 
Heart Pond 
West Chelmsford 
Forefathers 



80 
14 
5 
3 
7 
3 

Respectfully, 

ArthurJ. Colmer, Chairman 
Everett V. Olsen 
Gerald L. Hardy 



PARK COMMISSION 

Park Superintendent - Donald P. Gray 

Donald P. Gray was reappointed as Park Super- 
intendent and Mrs. Joan Schenk was elected chairman 
at an early spring meeting. 

As soon as the weather permitted, winter debris was 
cleared from all the parks, commons and squares. This 
past year involved a great deal of clean up work due to 
the late winter storm. All areas were once again re- 
furbished with loam, grass seed, lime and fertilizer. 
Several new shrubs were planted at the stone wall entrance 
of the Center Common but soon fell to vandalism. 

During the summer months appropriate areas were 
planted with colorful annuals and maintained for a long 
blooming season. Shurbs and bushes were pruned to 
proper shape and to maintain safety precautions. Major 
renovatiion work was accomplished at several locations, 
namely, Overlook Drive and Cherckerberry, and the 
Henry S. Perham Park on Chelmsford and Dalton Road. 

After much discussion among various groups of town 
officials as to the proper location of the Toll House, the 
historic structure finally found its present permanent 
home on the Center Common facing North Road. Shrubs 
typical of the 1800's were planted around the historic 
structure in time to be enjoyed by many visitor's to 
Chelmsford's Fourth of July Celebration. The Park 
Department greatly appreciates the financial donation 
from the Chelmsford Business Associates for the plantings 
on this site. 



98 



Flagpoles were repaired, painted and all check for 
safety. The flagpole at Winship Park in West Chelmsford 
will be repaired and replaced following an automobile 
accident during the winter months. We most sincerely 
thank the people who have continually aided with the 
daily flag raisings. 

Major Recreation Commission's areas remain the 
maintenance responsibility of the Park Department. 
Baseball fields at Roberts Field, Strawberry Hill, South 
Row recreational area, fields near the Southwell Combing 
Mill in North Chelmsford, East School fields, Little 
League fields on Chelmsford Street, as well as the ice 
skating area at Robert's Field. Because of the efforts to 
maintain the skating pond and its well lighted area, this 
recreational facility remains a favorite site. 

A front end loader attachment was purchased to be 
placed on the John Deere 830 tractor to enable this 
piece of equipment to be useful the year round. 

The continued cooperation and support from the 
Highway, Fire, Police, Tree Warden and Cemetery 
Departments is deeply appreciated. The Park Department 
would also like to acknowledge the work of the many 
garden clubs who for the past several years have 
contributed much to the appearance of some of the parks. 

J.Joan Schenk 
Arthur Louis Bennett 
Bradford O. Emerson 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 
STUDY COMMITTEE 

In February of 1976 the Department of Public works 
Study Committee presented a set of recommendations to 
the Board of Selectmen based on a year's study of the 
workings of the departments existing in Chelmsford as 
well as those of some 16 other towns. The Committee 
concluded that a consolidation of several departments 
under a single DPW would be advisable within the next 
few years, particularly with the prospect of adding sewers 
to the town functions. The Committee further concluded 
that before any consolidation is undertaken a more 
detailed study of the need and mechanism for consolida- 
tion should be done by a professional consultant. 

As authorized by the Board of Selectmen, the 
Committee developed specifications for the work to be 
performed, and after solicitation and review of bids, 
selected the firm of Charles M. Evans and Associates, of 
Carlisle, Mass. to perform the task. Funds for engaging 
the firm were appropriated under article 22 of the 1977 
Annual Town Meeting. Following signing of the contract 
on July 25, 1977, work commenced with an initial 
meeting of operating department heads on August 17th. 
Approximately 500 hours of professional services have 
been provided by Mr. Walter O'Connell, Principal 
Associate of the firm. Questionaires and fact finding 
sheets have been prepared, interviews held, and ob- 



servations of operations made. Operating data has been 
analyzed, and progress reports have been provided to the 
Committee. 

A series of seven major work tasks were carried out 
including an analysis of Chelmsford's resources, evaluation 
of their effectiveness, and a quantitative analysis of the 
data obtained. Other tasks included noting improvement 
opportunities; analyzing and evaluating potential organ- 
ization structures; comparing Chelmsford with two 
selected groups of communities and documenting the 
entire project. The latter step included providing 
conclusions reached, with substantiating rationale, and 
recommendations with appropriate supporting data. The 
following municipal services were studied: 

Highway maintenance, including storm drainage 

Cemetery operation and maintenance 

Care of Town-owned shade trees, including insect 
pest control 

Maintenance of Town-owned automotive equipment, 
including Police and Fire vehicles 

Collection and Dsiposal of Refuse 

Inspection Services (Building, Electrical, Plumbing 
and Gas) 

Engineering 

Construction and maintenance of sanitary sewers 

Maintenance of buildings and grounds, including 
school grounds 

At this time (January 1978), a Final Report is being 
prepared. The report includes approximately 14 recom- 
mendations to improve the effectiveness of current 
operations, policy formulation and administration, and 
to plan for future contingencies. A number of recom- 
mendations may be implemented by simply administrative 
action of the Board of Selectmen. 

Article 23 of the Annual Town Meeting authorized 
the sum of $2000 for participating in a demonstration 
public works management program. This program was to 
be conducted by the New England Innovation Group 
(NEIG). The NEIG is a public - funded organ- 
ization designed to improve the deliver of public 
services by local government in a variety of areas 
through the application of science and technology now 
available. Because of a current lack of funds and resources 
by NEIG, the planned program in which Chelmsford 
was to participate has not materialized. At this time, it is 
not anticipated that the funds authorized will be 
expended. 

The Committee is currently winding down its affairs. 
We wish to express our sincere appreciation to those 
involved in the management or operation of our Town 
services for the courtesy and cooperation shown the 
Committee and its consultant. We believe the results of 



99 



our efforts will be beneficial to the Town in the 
immediate and long-range future in improved efficacy 
of services provided, and in an organizational structure 
responsive to future needs. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Gerald Silver, Chairman 

George Auchy 

Barbara Langworthy 

Henry J. McClean 

Robert J. Monroe, Sr. 

Richard J. Russell 

Joan Schenk 



RECREATION COMMISSION 

The Chelmsford Recreation Commission consists of a 
maximum of 9 appointed volunteers. The Board of 
Selectmen, on an annual basis, may re-appoint present 
members. However, any citizen wishing to be considered 
can do so by submitting a written request for consideration. 
The Commission is appointed by the Selectmen, but it is 
responsible for the administration of the budget which it 
is responsible for the, administration of the budget which 
it submits to the voters of this Town at the Annual 
Meeting. This body is truly an independent body of 
volunteers, dedicated to the execution of the Town's 
recreational needs and to the long range fiscal and 
management goals. 

Most of the budget goes directly to programming. An 
equal amount of money is raised by the organizations 
which are Town supported. These supported organ- 
izations contribute nearly 20,000 hours of their personal 
time, their automobiles for transportation and their own 
personal finances when they hold cook-outs or team 
parties at the end of the year. The approximate $100,000 
support of the Town is nearly tripled when considering 
the total Community responsibility shown by these 
volunteer citizens. 

The administration of these programs, plus the 
maintenance of fields, buildings and equipment, is done 
through the Recreation Commission. Some capital 
outlays plus some salaries are required for those programs 
solely sponsored by the Town. The conversion of the old 
East School into a community complex is administered 
by CETA personnel and operated at about a break- 
even cost to the Town. Fortunately, the cost of CETA 
personnel is provided through a Government program. 
The escallation in the utilization of this complex helps to 
bring in revenue which has off-set the operational costs to 
date. 

With over 4,000 registered youths in the recreational 
programs in Chelmsford, it is fair to say that interests 
are high, the quality is good, the facilities are good and 
problems are comparably few. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Robert R. Charpentier, Chairman 
John Peters, Vice Chairman Paul Murphy 

Harry Ayotte Joan Murray 

Anthony Bruno Thomas Trainor 

William Dempster, Jr. Richard Sargent, Director 

Evelyn L. Newman, Administrative Assistant 

YOUTH CENTER 

Transition and Expansion would characterize the year 
1977 for the Chelmsford Youth Center. In addition to a 
new Coordinator, the entire staff except for our athletic 
supervisor, underwent personnel change. The Youth 
Center was very fortunate to have staff members such as 
Ms. Andrea Johnson, Ms. Robin Bowen, Mr. Lee 
Czaplinski, Ms. Pat Crowell and Ms. Anne Fleming, who 
had such dedication and enthusiasm and played a great 
part in making the Center what it is today. Along with 
new personnel, however came new backgrounds of 
expertise and experience which generated into many new 
programs and activities; several of which were; Yoga 
classes, a wrestling program, a weekly loom workshop, 
a babysitting clinic, a career counseling group, boxing 
clincics and a creative writing and poetry group. 

As evident, 1977 was a very busy year for the Youth 
Center participants, staff and Advisory Committee. The 
Center (housed in the McFarlin School) was open five 
nights per week (Monday-Friday). Along with the newly 
created programs mentioned above, our regular activities 
of Arts and Crafts, athletics and films were also run 
weekly, as well as regular tournaments in pool, ping pong, 
chess, checkers, and football. 

The Arts and Crafts program, previously run by Ms. 
Andrea Johnson and Ms. Robin Bowen, was conducted 
by Ms. Diane Masson and Ms. Jane Hoyt, both very 
capable staff members under the CETA program. The 
emphasis was on craft projects that could be completed 
in a single evening and that resulted in something that 
the Youth could take pride in accomplishing. 

Under the competent direction of Mr. Michael Fay, 
our Youth Center Athletic Supervisor, the athletic 
program comprised of basketball, volleyball, weight- 
lifting, wrestling and a complete gymnastics program was 
extremely well received by Chelmsford youth. The 
summer months also saw the kids getting involved in 
softball, frisbee, kickball and track events. In conducting 
these activities, Mike received an abundance of help 
from our two newest part time supervisors, Mr. Richard 
Graham and Mr. Jeffrey Sugden. 

Our weekly film program continued through 1977 
under the direction of Ms. Ellin Boorse, our Chief 
Supervisor, and Ms. Jane Hoyt. We received free films 
from the Boston Public Library with the assistance of 
The Adams Library Staff. Ellin and Jane supplemented 
these films with holiday movie packages and well known 
feature films shown outside during the summer months. 



100 



Another regular feature at the Center were our Coffee- 
houses and Dances. We recruited talent that entertained 
both kids and staff alike. The Youth Center proved to be 
stepping ground for several local groups and performers 
as some are now appearing in clubs and restaurants in 
the area. 

During 1977, the Youth Center sponsored many special 
events and fund raisers. In conjunction with the 
Scholarship Committee, the Center ran its first dance 
marathon at the Chelmsford High School. The event was 
a great success, and an "Awards Night" was held at the 
Center to hand out the top cash prizes for those who 
danced the longest and collected the most pledge money. 
Other fund raisers included a flea market and our annual 
July 4th raffle. Youth Center participants helped operate 
our booth and sell raffle tickets for prizes which were 
donated by Chelmsford merchants. July 4th also witnessed 
the marching of over 30 Youth Center clowns who gave 
away balloons and entertained the small children along 
the parade route. 

The Youth Center offered many field trips during the 
year, including a ski trip to Mt. Ascutney, Vt., a free 
tour, behind the scenes of Logan Airport, a visit to the 
Museum of Science, The New England Dragway's Funny 
Car National Championships, The New England 
Aquarium, Youth Day at Fort Devens, a Canobie Lake 
Park visit, several beach trips and afternoon trips of 
skating parties, bowling, movies and horseback riding. 
We were very happy to still have our Neighborhood 
Youth Corps worker, Linda Emmons with us, who helps 
to publicize all these field trips and Youth Center events. 

Our Youth Center Shuttle Bus service was again in 
operation during 1977. The Council on Aging very 
generously lends their van three evenings per week so 
that we may pickup kids on the outskirts of town who 
normally would not be able to come down to the Center. 
Staff member, Jane Hoyt, did most of the evening driving 
which enabled more Chelmsford youth to take part in our 
programs. 

The future appears to be one of increased activity and 
attendance, as more and more Chelmsford Youth 
Continue to participate in our programming and events; 
at present, 80 to 100 kids drop down to the Center every 
night. We intend to keep up and even expand on our 
"Community Service Projects" which will involve kids 
visiting such places as nursing homes and lending some 
cheer during holidays with their caroling and handing 
out different novelties that they made while in Arts and 
Crafts. We also plan to distribute a much researched, 
comprehensive "Resource Directory" to all Junior High 
and High School students in Chelmsford, which will help 
refer them to the most convenient and proper place for 
anything from a drug problem to where they can play 
basketball on weekends. The Youth Center will be 
engaged in these, and many more activities that will help 
to benefit the Youth of our Community. 



Respectfully submitted, 

James Woodman 
Youth Center Coordinator 

Youth Center Advisory Committee 

. Tan Greeno, Chairperson 

Members: J 

Everett Brown 

Phyllis Dougherty, Chairperson - Fund Raising Committee 

Martha Doukszewicz 

Jay Finnegan 

Mike and Carol Gilchrist 

Judy Harrison, Treaurer 

Vincent Harrison 

Wendell Luke 

William Murphy, Selectman 

Trudy Wall 

George Weinert, Vice Chairman 

Joanne Weinert 

Jo Ann Weisman, Secretary 

ExOfficio Members: 

Norman Douglas 

Robert Hall 

Brian Sullivan 

PLUMBING INSPECTOR 

PLUMBING INSPECTOR WILLIAM SHEDD 

This being the second year that the Plumbing 
Inspector has been transferred from the Board of Health 
to the Building Inspector's office, it makes a very efficient 
operation. 

The Plumbing Inspector, Gas Inspector, Wire In- 
spector and Building Inspector's work is very closely 
related; therefore the expenses are reduced considerably. 

I thank all the Inspectors, the townspeople and other 
departments for their cooperation. 

In 1977, there were 124 Plumbing Permits and 51 Hot 
Water Tank Permits issued. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William Shedd 
Plumbing Inspector 

WIRE INSPECTOR 

Wire Inspector - Harold M. Tucke, Jr. 

With the position becoming full time, the respon- 
sibilities have been insurmountable and 1977 has proven 
to be a very eventful year. 

Working with the Building Inspector under Chapter 
802 on many and frequent occasions and mu own 
Chapter 30A and 143 for the Department of Public 
Safety, the work load keeps me very busy. With the new 
state law making it mandatory that fire alarms must be 
installed in all new residential homes also including all 
new buildings, adds to the existing work load. I have to 



101 



work extensively with Mass Electric which requires them 
to notify me of all meter changes, Power Services of any 
nature, and emergencies of the Town of Chelmsford 
throughout day or night. The Fire Department on all fire 
situations being summoned whenever a situation arises 
day or night. 

Working extensively with the Plumbing Inspector on 
all changes concerning electrical hot water heaters, etc., 
also working extensively with the Gas Inspector, on air 
conditioner systems being gas fired but electrical cooled. 

Working with all signs being erected, which requires 
electrical permits. 

It makes it very convenient for a group of inspectors 
working together. 

There were 448 applications for wire permits issued in 
1977. The majority of these requiring several inspections. 

Inspections made for wire permits 1 108 

Type of Inspections No. 

Commercial & Industrial buildings 216 

Residential buildings 243 

Fire Alarms 181 
Service chgs., dryers, pools, relocations 

water service change-grounding, fire damage, etc. 468 

Respectfully submitted, 

Harol M. Tucke, Jr. 
Wire Inspector 



In performing my duty, I have sealed the following: 

164 Gasoline Meters 

24Scales - 100 to 5,000 pounds 

53 Scales - more than 10 less than 100 pounds 

17 Scales - 10 pounds or less 
117 Avoirdupois Weights 

12 Apothecary Weights 
1 Rope Wire Cordage 

Money received from seals, the sum of $588.90, has 
been turned over to the town Treasurer. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Anthony C. Ferreira 
Sealer of Weights and Measures 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 

The following is the Animal Inspector Report for the 
year 1977: 



Number of dog bites 
Number of cattle 
Number of horses 
Number of swine 
Number of sheep 



63 
177 

68 
364 

14 

Respectfully submitted, 
Martin A. Gruber, D.V.M. 



GAS INSPECTOR-NEAL STANLEY 

1977 has proven to be an eventful year with all the 
inspectors in the same office. My position as Gas Inspector 
has been made more efficient which means a more 
efficient department for the Town of Chelmsford. My 
duties have increased with all the added State require- 
ments and laws. 

"I wish to thank all the people and departments that 
have cooperated so much to make this department what 
it is. 

There were 135 permits issued in 1977. 

There were 310 inspections made by the Gas Inspector. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Neal Stanley 
Gas Inspector 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: 

Gentlemen: 

As Sealer of Weights and Measures for the town of 
Chelmsford, I wish to submit my report for the year 1977. 



DOG OFFICER 

The following is a report of my services as Dog 
Officer for the year 1977: 



Stray dogs sold to individuals 




49 


Stray dogs sent to Medical Schools 


114 


Stray disposed of 




28 


Total stray dogs picked up 




191 


Complaints investigated 




746 


Miscellaneous calls 




2968 


Dead animals picked up 




328 


Miles traveled 




21694 


Lost dogs returned to owners 




86 




Respectfully submitted, 




Frank 


Wojtas 




Dog 


Officer 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

The following is our Commission's Annual Report that 
contains our membership status, 1977 accomplishments, 
and 1978 plans. 



102 



Name 

John Balco 
Edward Duffy 
Donald House 
David Merrill 
John McCormack 
Charles Parlee 
Frank Siraco 



MEMBERSHIP STATUS 

1977 Responsibility Expires 

Space Planning/ Acquisition Committee 1979 

Reservation Management Committee 1978 

Wetlands Protection Committee 1978 

Treasurer 1979 

Chairman 1980 

Recycling Committee Coordinator 1978 

Clerk and Wetlands Committee Member 1 980 



Mrs. Betty Stubblebine is our part-time secretary. 
Membership changes during the year included the 
appointment of frank Siraco. In July, William Pestana, 
a CETA employee, was assigned to the Commission to 
fulfill specific job duties relating to reservation develop- 
ment. 

1977 Accomplishments - Overview 

Substantial progress has been made during the year 
primarily in the areas of reservation development, 
public support to protect wetlands, state funding for land 
acquisitions, and cooperation between the Conservation/ 
Planning/Appeals and Health Boards. 

Reservation Development 

Our prime efforts have been devoted to upgrading 
conservation lands in order to promote public use. 
Through Bill Pestana's full-time efforts, we have made 
solid progress towards that goal. Reservations have been 
cleaned up of trash, safety hazards corrected, dead trees 
removed, hiking trails opened up an re -identified, 
entrance signs constructed, and snow plowing arrange- 
ments made. The three reservations receiving the brunt 
of our attention have been the lime Quarry (Route 110), 
George B. B. Wright (Route 27) and the Crooked 
Springs Road sites. 

The Woodridge Garden Club presented the Town a 
gift picnic table that is located at the Crooked Springs 
Reservation. We deeply appreciate this spirit of voluntary 
public interest. 

Wetland Protection Administration 

The duties associated with the local administration ot 
the Wetlands Protection Act easily absorbs most of the 
time and effort of our seven (7) members. Fortunately, 
the Townspeople have helped tremendously by advising 
us when wetlands transgressions begin to happen. 
To improve on our wetlands administrative capabilities, 
we will shortly hire professional services to delineate 
wetland boundaries and we have embarked on a 
"water watch" program that will give us a stronger data 
base for use in decision making. In addition, a ground 
water study is underway and will help us ascertain water 
supply recharge areas so that we can better judge this 
critical factor in our wetlands deliberations. Finally, the 
increase in inter-government cooperation is beginning to 
help our Commission achieve a more pro-active position 
in the effective management of the Town's natural 
resources. 



Space Planning/Land Acquisition 

We are pleased to report that the Town will receive 
$39,000 from the state's self-help program, to defray 
50% of the acquisition costs of the Lime Quarry 
extension and the Winter Street property. The Com- 
mission will continue to research potential acquisitions 
for the purpose of giving the Townspeople the opportunity 
to vote on increasing open space. We have a long term 
open space plan, that we continually update and use as a 
guide to judge progress in this area. Our prime objective 
is to increase town-owned open space in such a manner as 
to preserve and protect natural resources. Our committee 
devoted to this activity includes volunteer assistants 
Mrs. Claire Thompson and Mr. Robert Stallard - to whom 
we are very grateful for their valuable help. 

Budget Status 

Our prime objectives are as follows: 

(1) Accelerate our reservation development work so 

that the public will more frequently 
use reservation lands. 

(2) Improve our wetlands administration skills. 

(3) Promote inter-board cooperation regarding conser- 
vation and Town by-law matters. 

(4) Expand working contacts with neighboring com- 
missions. 

(5) Upgrade public knowledge and awareness of why 
wetlands protection is necessary and beneficial to 
homeowners, developers, and the entire town. 

John McCormack 
Chairman 



TREE DEPARTMENT 

At the time of this report, most of this dept. work load 
has been removal of storm damage remaining in tree tops. 
This damage resulting from the snow storm of May 9th 
has left this dept. with work that will take many months 
to correct. Much of this storm work was performed by 
Mass. Electric tree crews, however, all trees not near 
utility wires has been the towns responsibility. As a result 
of that storm, most of our budget used to date was used 
unexpectedly, leaving scheduled work unattended. 

During the last six months of fiscal 1977, prior to the 
May storm, this dept. has completed a street tree pruning 
program on Elm Street and Park Road from Proctor Rd., 
also Dunstable Rd. 

In addition to the pruning program 123 dead or 
dangerous trees of various sizes have been removed. 

As in the past four years, storm work has increased 
beyond our budget allocations. 

The current remaining budget will be used to complete 
pruning projects on Carlisle Rd. and Warren Ave. Also, 
there are currently 96 trees to be removed with this years 
budget. 



103 



The tree Dept. wishes to thank other departments for 
their assistance throughout the year. 

Respectfully Submitted; 

Myles F. Hogan 
Tree Warden 

INSECT PEST CONTROL DEPARTMENT 

This dept. has the responsibility of controlling insect 
pests pertaining to trees. As a part of this responsibility, 
trees which have been destroyed as a result of certain 
diseases are removed, the expenses accured for the 
removal of diseased trees accounts for one hundred per 
cent of the departments budget. 

As in recent years, no insecticides have been used in 
town by this department. It will be the policy of this 
department to continue monitoring all insect problems 
affecting trees. However, any use of insecticides will be 
proceeded by a public notice before the application. This 
procedure has been the policy of this department as a 
result of past town meetings, and objections by various 
conservation minded people. 

The actual number of trees removed total 109 an 
additional 132 diseased trees are allocated for this years 
budget. 

Respectfully submitted; 

Myles F. Hogan 
Insect Pest Control Supt. 



TOWN AIDE 

Throughout 1977, the Town Aide Department focused 
its efforts toward assisting the Townspeople by en- 
couraging participation in all available anti-poverty 
programs. In addition to seeking increased awareness and 
participation in programs such as: Concentrated Em- 
ployment Programs, Neighborhood Youth Corps, Head- 
start, Family Day Care, Foster Grandparent Program, 
Retired Senior Volunteer Program, Senior Companion 
Program, Section 8 Subsidy Program, and Food Stamp 
Program; increased recruitment efforts were made for 
other programs during the year. 

Winterization 

Community Teamwork, Inc.'s Winterization Program 
continued to assist low income persons in reducing long 
term energy costs by winterizing homes. In 1977, for the 
first time, the program offered services to eligible tenants 
as well as homeowners. Based upon the condition of the 
dwelling, available services include; weatherstripping, 
caulking, replacing broken glass, and providing some 
insulation or storm windows. In addition to free labor, 
free materials can be provided if the applicant is 
financially eligible. 



Special Crisis Intervention Program 

This program operated during the month of August 
1977, as CTI received $209,000. from the Dept. of 
Community Affairs to distribute to low income persons of 
Greater Lowell. In Chelmsford, twenty-three (23) eligible 
elderly and families received some financial assistance to 
help meet their energy needs. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kathleen Robinson 
Town Aide 

CHELMSFORD COUNCIL ON AGING 

The Chelmsford Council on Aging is an organization 
providing services and programs which are designed to 
improve the quality of life for Town of Chelmsford 
residents who are sixty years of age or older. The following 
report briefly describes the services which were offered 
during 1977. Further information may be obtained at the 
Council's office which is located at the Emerson House, 
11 North Road, Chelmsford. 

Transportation 

Demand for the Council on Aging transportation 
service increased again in 1977. During the year, the van 
traveled 22,597 miles and transported 4,941 elderly 
residents to their destinations. 

Nutrition 

The Elderly Lunch Program continued in 1977 to offer 
nutritious luncheons at a cost of 50<? per meal. Moreover, 
the program was expanded in September 1977 so that the 
luncheon is available three (3) days a week; Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Thursday, at the McFarlin School, 
beginning at 1:00 pm. In addition, volunteers began in 
November 1977 to deliver meals to residents of the 
Chelmsford Arms Elderly Housing in an effort to solve 
transportation problems and reach home bound elderly. 
In November and December 1977, over 600 meals were 
delivered to Chelmsford Arms residents. Volunteers 
continued efforts in reaching other home-bound elderly 
and delivered 135 Easter dinners, 150 Thanksgiving 
dinners and 150 Christmas dinners. 

In total, over 10,000 meals were served during 1977. 

Health Maintenance 

Sponsored by Elder Services of the Merrimack Valley, 
in cooperation with the Lowell Visiting Nurse Association, 
the elderly health clinics serviced 130 clients during the 
year. The clinics are held regularly each month at the 
North Congregational Church, Chelmsford Arms and St. 
Mary's Church and offer services such as: blood pressure 
and cardiac status monitorization and assistance with 
medication regimes and diets. 

The Council assisted in sponsoring special clinics which 
were held in 1977. In June, a Glaucoma Screening Clinic 



104 



was held and 114 elderly residents were examined. Thirty 
nine (39) persons were referred for suspected glaucoma or 
pathology. In October, an Influenza Clinic was held and 
over 400 persons were immunized. 

Elder Services of the Merrimack Valley 

Through an appropriation at the 1977 Annual Town 
Meeting, the Town of Chelmsford continued as a 
sponsoring member of Elder Services, entitling Chelms- 
ford's elderly to supportive services. The following report 
outlines the services offered by the agency during 1977 
and the number of clients who received service. 



Homemaker, Chore, and Case Management 
Transportation 

Local 

Boston 
Mental Health Counseling 
Income Tax Assistance 



55 



22 

3 

40 



In addition, Elder Services employs Senior Aides who 
perform outreach and provide assistance to Chelmsford's 
elderly. In July 1977, a second Senior Aide was assigned 
to Chelmsford, and helped to reach 9t>3 clients wno were 
contacted during the year. 

Recreation 

The Arts and Crafts Class was held at Emerson House 
during 1977 and provided recreational activity for many. 
Hand-made articles were created for the annual Fall and 
Fourth of July Fairs. In addition, hats and mittens were 
given to the children in the Chelmsford/Westford 
Headstart Class at Christmas. 

The Council on Aging helped to sponsor various 
recreational trips planned by the Senior Citizens Club 
during the year. Senior Citizens traveled to such places as 
the Springfield Fair, Fenway Park, Salem Willows Pier, 
New Bedford, Plymouth, the Chateau de Ville, Quincy 
Market and Sturbridge Village. 

Senior Citizen Drop In Center 

With the creation of the Senior Citizen Drop In 
Center Committee in March 1977, the renovation of the 
Old South Row Schoolhouse for use as a centralized 
facility for the elderly came closer to realization. The 
Council on Aging would like to thank committee members 
Louise Bishop, Gula Boyce, Philip Currier, Edward Hood 
and William Marson as well as Town Planner Robert 
Flynn and his replacement Kenneth Carney who met 
regularly throughout the year and were instrumental in 
planning the facility. A great deal of work was ac- 
complished during the year as an architect was hired, 
floor plans were designed, specifications were advertised 
and contracts were awarded and signed. Actual renova- 
tions and construction began in October 1977 and 
completion of the project is expected in early 1978. 
The Council looks forward to an expansion of services, 
specifically health and recreational activities, when the 
Center is completed in 1978. 



The Council also plans, in 1978, to work to further 
meet the transportation needs of Chelmsford's elderly, 
particularly those persons requiring medical transportation 
to Boston. Finally, the Council would like to thank the 
Townspeople and the Town Officials for their continued 
interest and support of its efforts to assist the elderly 
of Chelmsford. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Louise M. Bishop, Chairman 

Christina Ahern William Marson 

Gula Boyce, Vice Chairman Mary McAuliffe 

Clarence Dane 

Edna Nelson, Treasurer 

Sara Dunigan Kathleen Robinson, Secretary 

Lilian Gould H. Chadbourne Ward 



HOME RULE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

The Home Rule Advisory Committee was formed by 
the March 1963 Town Meeting to examine state - local 
relations and report on such to the Selectmen. The 
seven members are appointed by the Selectmen. In 
addition to informing the Selectmen on state - local issues, 
the committee has taken on other advisory tasks at the 
request of the Selectmen, and also advises other town 
official bodies of pending or newly passed state legislation 
as it may impact their official responsibilities. Copies of 
new legislation were distributed to several town bodies 
during the year. The Citizen's Guide Book was completed 
and distributed. Many requests for this popular booklet 
were received from both in and out of town requesters. 
Among other items which the committee acted on during 
the year were the following: 

1 . Prepared a response to the Attorney General on the 
town's Recall Bylaw. 

2. Looked into methods for improving attendance at 
Town Meeting, including: 

a. Publicity Banners 

b. Splitting Town Meeting into Fall and Spring 
sessions. 

c. Preparing a questionaire for the citizens on Town 
Meeting. 

3. Investigating the economics of use of Voting 
Machines. 

4. Methods for conducting Public Hearings more 
efficiently. 

5. Revised Appointed Committee Handbook. 

6. Held discussions with Representative Bruce Freeman 
about pending or proposed state legislation and the 
legislative process. 

The HRAC is sponsoring a warrant article on splitting 
Town Meeting into two functions. Other future recom- 
mendations to the voters are in process. 

I extend my thanks to all the members who participated 



105 



and carried the work load this past year and to the 
Selectmen for their support. 

The Home Rule Advisory Committee thanks the 
Chelmsford School Committee and School Administration 
for making facilities available for our meetings. 

Sincerely, 

Jean-PaulJ. Gravell 
Chairman 

ENVIRONMENTAL ADVISORY 
COUNCIL 



Donald H. Caless 
Ina B. Greenblatt, Chairman 
Dr. Ethel n. Kamien 
Diane H. Lewis 



Gerald F. Locker 

Gene D. Roberts 

Mary M. Wadman 

Michael Zymaris 



Recommendations have been made this year for imple- 
mentation of the Town mandated recycling program. 
These include: 

1 . Purchase of necessary equipment 

2. Development of an information program to 
acquaint the townspeople with the benefits of 
recycling 

3. Establishment of fiscal guidelines and account- 
ability specific to the recycling program 

4. Assistance to town departments in facilitating the 
recycling program 

We regret to report that of this date, due to delays 
beyond the Town's control, few of these recommendations 
have been executed. We are optimistic that they 
remain viable for the coming year. The CEAC concurs 
and supports the Board of Health in their stand on 
local mosquito control rather than again joining the 
Central Massachusetts Mosquito Control Project. 

It is regrettable that the Salt Shed approved by the 
voters and needed to save salt and prevent leaching into 
our water supply, is still not erected. We hope that, too, 
will become a reality this coming year. 

Again we thank the citizens of Chelmsford for their 
support as we work to safe guard Chelmsford's en- 
vironment. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ina B. Greenblatt, Chairman 

NORTHERN MIDDLESEX AREA 
COMMISSION 

The Northern Middlesex Area Commission is a public, 
comprehensive regional planning agency created under 
state legislation by its nine member city and towns. The 
Commission's planning recommendations are strictly 
advisory. The Commission meets monthly, usually on the 
third Wednesday evening. The public is welcomed and 
invited to attend. 



Major planning programs and progress in the past year 
included the following: 

Housing 

Major progress was made toward adoption of an 
Areawide Housing Opportunity Plan under Federal 
guidelines, which if implemented locally, will help to 
solve documented housing needs now present in every 
community. All housing planning has been undertaken 
with an advisory committee including Housing Author- 
ities, builders, tenants, bankers and minorities. 

Economic Development 

An updated Overall Economic Development Plan was 
prepared in conjunction with a locally representative 
advisory committee. The Plan sets out statistics on the 
area's economic condition and characteristics, and 
enumerates major project progress and proposals. The 
document serves to maintain governmental and business 
eligibility for U.S. Economic Development Administration 
grants and loans. 

Transportation 

The Commission, in cooperation with the Lowell 
Regional Transit Authority, the State Department of 
Public Works, and the State Executive Office of 
Transportation and Construction, maintains a compre- 
hensive transportation planning program for the area. 

The planning process is based upon policies which 
prefer low cost management improvements to increase 
existing roadway capacity, recommending new construc- 
tion only when unavoidable, and selective public and 
paratransit improvements. 

Specific improvement recommendations have been 
enumerated for State and Federal consideration and 
funding. A locally representative transportation advisory 
committee advises on transportation policies, priorities, 
and needs. 

Environment 

Several program areas aimed at improving the quality 
of life and the physical and manmade environment of 
the region have been undertaken by the Commission as 
follows: 

a. Water Quality. The Commission has continued its 
efforts to design a cost-efficient and effective plan and 
program to meet Federal 1985 clean water goals. 
Detailed recommendations for sewage collection and 
treatment, definition of areas best suited for septic 
tank operation, and measures for the disposal of septage 
and sludge are being prepared. All studies and 
recommendations have been reviewed by an advisory 
committee of local health, sewer, public works, and 
planning boards. 

b. Historic Planning. Working with local historic 
commissions and interests, the Northern Middlesex 



106 



Area Commission published a report on regionally 
significant historic assets and is following up with plans 
and programs to better preserve those assets. 

c. Water Supply. Recommendations for protection and 
improvement of aquifiers, which are essential to all 
groundwater supplies are being prepared. The Com- 
mission supports an improved and enlarged city water 
plant which could be an important supplement to 
groundwater supplies while serving as an important 
advantage for the City. 

d. Solid Waste Disposal. Commission studies have 
indicated there is great potential for a cost efficient, 
energy saving, long-term solution to solid waste 
disposal problems and recommends that every com- 
munity join the deliberations of the Northeast Solid 
Waste Committee. Membership cost is nominal and 
participation will help assure each community that, 
if implemented, the regional program will best meet 
its particular needs. 

e. Open Space and Recreation. The Commission 
continues to cooperate with local and state efforts to 
acquire, develop and improve open space and recreation 
opportunities in the area. 



Comprehensive Planning 

It is the Commission's major responsibility to assure 
that its plans are based upon full recognition of all 
relevant significant social, economic and physical con- 
siderations. 

a. Land Use. The major theme of the land use plan 
now before the Commission and local boards is the 
effective and efficient accomodation of anticipated 
future growth in the region. The plan contains 
recommendations to intensify development in those 
areas which will best accomodate new growth at 
minimum municipal expense, and to reduce the 
intensity of development in those areas which cannot 
adequately support development and thus will tend to 
increase municipal costs. 

b. Growth Indicators. The Commission has completed 
an evaluation of population and economic potentials in 
order to anticipate growth development pressures upon 
the region and each community. 

c. Growth Policy. The Commission participated in the 
Massachusetts Growth Policy Development Act and 
filed a Growth Policy Report with the Commonwealth. 

d. Clearinghouse. The Commission serves as a federally 
designated clearinghouse under Office of Management 
and Budget Circular A-95 to review and provide 
an advisory opinion, after consideration of comments 
from interested local boards and others, on most federal 
grant and aid applications generated by governmental 
and private interests of the area. 



Technical Assistance 

The Commission provides technical assistance to local 
boards and others interested in its work as a means for 
implementing its comprehensive and functional plans and 
policies. Examples include: a CETA project designed to 
utilize resources available at the Commission, provision of 
a shared personnel specialist to assist five communities in 
the development and management of their personnel 
policies, maintenance of a planning library, and filling of 
requests for various data on the region, help with a lake 
restoration project with a conservation commission, an 
environmental impact statement for a building study 
committee, help with community development block 
grant applications, and in the drafting of by-laws and 
rules and regulations. 

Financial 

During the fiscal year ended June 30, 1977, the 
Commission expended $412,369. The local share raised 
by assessments on the nine member communities was 
$60,000. The balance was contributed by Urban Mass 
Transportation Administration, Environmental Protection 
Agency, State Department of Public works, Massachusetts 
Historical Commission, Lowell Regional Transit Author- 
ity, Department of Housing and Urban Development and 
U.S. Bureau of the Census. 

The budget for fiscal year 1978 is $331,212 of which 
$60,000 was raised from local assessments. 

Additional details on all aspects of the Commission 
are available on request at: 
144 Merrimack Street, Lowell, MA 01852 
telephone 454-8021 

Respectfully submitted: 

CHELMSFORD NMAC MEMBERS 

Arnold Lovering, Selectmen 

Eugene Gilet, Planning Board 

Daniel Burke, Alternate 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

The Chelmsford Housing Authority continues to be 
active in the supervision of the three on-going programs 
which provide eighty one units of lost cost housing in 
Chelmsford. Sixty four of these units are under Ch 667-1 
at Chelmsford Arms, eight are under Ch 707 and are 
"scattered site'' units, and ten are under Ch 667-2 and are 
involved in the Community Residence leased to GLARC 
in North Chelmsford. 

Due to the lack of new funding, our long range plans 
for public housing in Chelmsford are falling far behind. 
An application for an additional program of elderly 
housing under Ch 667 has been on file with the 
Department of Community Affairs for over two years with 
preliminary approval but has not proceeded through the 
process any further. Our "scattered site" program has 
been unable to obtain approval for any additional units 



107 



either under the Ch 707 program funded by the state or 
under the Section Eight program funded by the Federal 
Government through HUD. We continue to apply for 
Section Eight funding each application period but find 
that these funds are being allocated to cities or area wide 
programs rather than to the smaller housing authorities. 
This year we continue to pursue this funding and have 
applied for twenty five units to be funded for Chelmsford. 

Our public housing programs have been in operation 
since 1974. During those years we have had an average of 
five tenants turnover each year. Because of the greater 
number of persons becoming eligible due to age each 
year we are developing a longer waiting list each year and 
the need for this type of housing increases. 

During the past year the Tenant's Association at 
Chelmsford Arms was re-activated. This group works with 
the Housing Authority, providing input and approval or 
disapproval to the policy making decisions of the board as 
they effect the operation of Chelmsford Arms and also 
provides some social activity for the tenants. 

The most recent program to be undertaken by the 
authority is to become involved in a program to promote 
the use of solar heat in this region. Under this program 
funds for the planning are provided by Department of 
Community Affairs and upon acceptance of the plan the 
project is funded by federal funds through HUD. Our 
present project involves the installation of a solar heating 
unit in the Community Building at Chlemsford Arms. The 
preliminary planning has been accomplished, the plans 
approved by Department of Community Affairs and an 
application has been make to HUD for the final phase. 

We thank the people of the Town and the Town 
Officials for their continued support and interest in our 
work. Our meetings are held the first Tuesday of the 
month at 7:30 pm in the Community Building of 
Chelmsford Arms at 1 Smith Street and all meetings are 
open to the public. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Claude A. Harvey, Chairman 

Richard L. Monahan 

Robert A. Sheridan 



Ruth K. Delaney 
Robert Hughes 
John M. Manning, Jr. 

(appointment exp. 4/77) 



SEWER COMMISSION 

This past year, as a result of inaction by the 
Massachusetts Division of Water Pollution Control 
(MDWPC), the Sewer Commission and the Town of 
Chelmsford have been placed in a position of uncertainty 
concerning the future of its proposed sewer program. 

Chelmsford's Step I Facility Plan was submitted to the 
MDWPC on December 21, 1976 as scheduled to take 
advantage of the Federal and State construction aid-in- 
grant funds that has become available for laterals. The 
cutoff date for this funding was September 30, 1977 and 



at this time we can not tell whether these funds have been 
irretrievably lost. 

The Sewer Commission feels that the MDWPC has 
been negligent in the handling of our project. This is 
indicated by the fact that repeated efforts to find out the 
status of our Facility Plan failed, and only after a 
registered letter was sent, did the Sewer Commission 
learn that the MDWPC was working on our Plan. They 
had directly and verbally contacted the Town's consulting 
engineers for additional data. After the consultant's reply 
to these questions (through the Sewer Commission) it has 
taken the MDWPC another three months to contact us 
with the response that there are yet other questions to be 
resolved. (Receipt of letter January 25, 1978) 

Unfortunately, the current status of the Chelmsford 
Facility Plan is at the same point it was one year ago, 
AWAITING APPROVAL FROM THE MDWPC! 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHELMSFORD SEWER COMMISSION 

Theodore J. Rapallo, Chairman 

Matthew J. Doyle 

Charles L. Weaver 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

John P. Richardson, Chairman 

John C. Alden, Vice Chairman 

Bertha E. Trubey, Clerk 

Jane B. Drury Richard O. Lahue, Sr. 

John D. Hamilton George A. Parkhurst 

Members leaving during the year: 

Audrey A. Carragher 

Mary J. Guaraldi 

Robert C. Spalding 

The Historical Commission was established by the 
Town, about twelve years ago, for the purpose of 
preservation, promotion and development of its historical 
assets. Under the law, the Commission's primary duties 
are to compile and maintain an inventory of the Town's 
historical assets and to act as a coordinator for groups 
concerned with history or historic preservation. 

During the year, 25 historically significant buildings 
have been researched and added to the inventory of town 
historical assets. Duplicate records have been filed with 
the Massachusetts Historical Commission. Considerable 
progress has been made on completing the research and 
records required for listing The Center Historic District 
in the National Register of Historic Places. In 
consultation with the Massachusetts Historical Com- 
mission, revised boundaries have been set and 36 
significant historic buildings are to be proposed for 
listing. Properties listed in the National Register are 
eligible for 50% matching grants under the 
National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 and owners 



108 



of National Register commercial property are entitled to 
tax breaks provided by the Tax Reform Act of 1976 for 
rehabilitation projects. Completion of the requirements 
for submittal is scheduled within 1978. In a separate 
action, The Fiske House was accepted by the National 
Park Service for listing in the National Register on 
December 8, 1977. 

Responsibility for the management of the 1802 School- 
house and the 1832 Middlesex Canal Toll House, along 
with custody of the publications of the retired Bi- 
centennial Commission was assigned to the Historical 
Commission by the Board of Selectmen. 

The 1802 Schoolhouse is now used as an office for the 
Historical Commission and the Historic District Com- 
mission and, in addition, 14 classes from 4 different 
Chelmsford schools have visited the building to experience 
education in the early 19th century, through an expanded 
field studies program initiated by Social Studies Co- 
ordinator, Dr. Charles Mitsakos. 

The 1832 Middlesex Canal Tollhouse was placed 
permanently on the Center Common through the 
combined efforts of the Board of Selectmen, the Park 
Department, the Historic District Commission and the 
Historical Commission. 

The Bicentennial Commission publications continue 
to be sold, with the proceeds returned to the Town 
Treasury. 

A protective cover for the Town's Bicentennial Quilt 
was installed, with the assistance of the Adams Library 
Staff. 

In an on-going project of identifying the Town's major 
historic sites, the Commission provided assistance to 
Donald Codling, who placed granite markers along the 
route taken by Chelmsford's Minutemen to the Battle of 
Concord on April 19, 1775, joined with the Cemetery 
Department in erecting dated slate markers for Fore- 
father's and Heart Pond Cemetaries and is continuing to 
research and mark the location of significant historical 
sites throughout the Town. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John P. Richardson 
Chairman 



CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 

During 1977, as in recent years, the highlight of the 
Town Celebrations, focused on the Fourth of July 
Celebration in Chelmsford. The Chelmsford Minutemen 
Coordinating Committee must once again be com- 
plimented on their excellent planning and administration 
of the 197 7 Celebration, the County Fair on the Town 
Common, the Band Concert, Square Dancing and the 
Grand Parade on the 4th., which this past year was 



attended by several thousands from throughout the area. 
Many thanks to Chelmsford Art Society for the Art 
Festival, the Recreation Commission for the Road Races, 
Chelmsford Lodge of Elks for the gigantic fireworks 
display. 

The Committee must compliment personnel of the 
Police, Fire, Public Works and Park Departments for 
their splendid cooperation during the Celebration, a 
special thanks to the members of the Chelmsford Auxiliay 
Police Unit. 

Preparations are now underway for the 1978 Fourth of 
July Celebration. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walter R. Hedlun, Chairman 

Raymond Day 

Dana Cafelle 

James K . Gifford 



REVOLUTIONARY WAR 

BICENTENNIAL CELEBRATIONS 

COMMISSION 

George Adams Parkhurst, Chairman 
HedwigH. Zabierek, Clerk 
John C. Alden Richard O. Lahue 

Audrey A. Carragher Janet Lombard 

Mary J. Guaraldi Charles J. Marderosian 

Walter R. Hedlund Anna F. Normand 

John Perry Richardson 

After nearly six years of planning and organization of 
the 200th Anniversary of the United States, the Bi- 
centennial Commission disbanded in the spring of 1977. 
At its final meeting on March 29, 1977, having completed 
the work for which it was created, the Commission voted 
to dissolve. All records, properties, and publications were 
turned over to the Chelmsford Historical Commission 
and the balance of funds remaining in the Commission's 
treasury were returned to the Town 

A report, reviewing all Bicentennial activities that were 
either sponsored, co-sponsored, or funded by the Bi- 
centennial Commission, was published in limited quanitity. 
A few copies of this report are still available. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George Adams Parkhurst, Chairman 



109 




HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 



Richard O. Lahue, St., Chairman 
Paul Canniff, Vice Chairman 
Robert LaPorte, Jr. 
John Perry Richardson 
Stephen Wojcik 

Alternates 

Harold J. Davis 
Charles Watt 

During the year 1977, the Historic District Commission 
met at the 1802 School House on the first and third 
Monday of each month. Six Public Hearings were held 
and Certificates of Appropriateness were issued to the 
following applicants: 



February 23, 1977 



March 21, 1977 



May 3, 1977 



May 3, 1977 



-First Bank & Trust Company at 
One Billerica Road and 44 Central 
Sq. for remodeling and addition to 
structures, changes to the ap- 
purtenances and landscaping, and 
erection of signs. 

-Raymond Osborn and Howard J. 
Hall at 59-61 Central Sq. for door- 
way changes. 

-Bradford Realty Trust at 20 
Chelmsford Street for construction 
of a 16' x 44' addition. 

— The Board of Selectmen for re- 
location of the Toll House to the 
Town Common. 



December 19, 1977 -Old Landmark Realty at One 
Chelmsford Street for sign change 
and building addition. 

December 19, 1977 —Central Congregational Church 
for a handicapped ramp in front 
of the Church. 

* Public Hearing waived - adjoining 
property owners notified. 

November 21, 1977 —First Bank & Trust for signs at 
Fiske House. 

* Application denied. 



During the past year the Historic District Commission 
has continued it's efforts to preserve and protect the 
distinctive characteristics of our Historic District in the 
center of Chelmsford. By our efforts, we hope to provide 
the town with a continuing sense of it's past through this 
visual example of our historical and cultural heritage. By 
limiting the destruction and disintegration of the 
historical legacies of our ancestors, this area can continue 
to be enjoyed by future generations. 

The Commission will be engaged in upgrading the 
signs within the District during the coming year, 
improving the settings of buildings, and encouraging new 
design compatible with existing buildings in the District. 

Richard Lahue 
Chairman 



110 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

Edward H. Hilliard, Chairman 
Herbert F. Bennett Michael J. Devine 

Robert J. Noble (resigned) 

Mary E. St. Hilaire, Ex-Officio 

Voting Strength as of December 31, 1977 
Prec. Dem. Rep. Amer. Ind. Total 



1 


447 


362 


1 


715 


1525 


2 


501 


203 


1 


458 


1163 


3 


643 


251 





892 


1786 


4 


384 


98 





248 


730 


5 


519 


326 


2 


1071 


1918 


6 


568 


275 





588 


1431 


7 


420 


239 





535 


1194 


8 


326 


272 





560 


1158 


9 


423 


132 





571 


1126 


10 


648 


263 





944 


1855 


11 


457 


258 





446 


1161 


12 


552 


219 





811 


1582 


Total 


5888 


2898 


4 


7839 


16629 



CRYSTAL LAKE 
RESTORATION COMMITTEE 

Edmund Polubinski, Chairman 

Peter Dulchinos John J. Kenney 

Thomas E. Firth, Jr. Robert C. McManimon 

Robert G. Gagnon Haworth C. Nield 

PaulC. Hart 

For all intents and purposes, restoration of Crystal 
Lake is now completed. We were so informed by 
DeMatteo Construction Co. and this was confirmed by 
Fay, Spofford and Thorndike, the project engineers. 

We are now awaiting word from the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts Department of Public Works, Division of 
Waterways, that the work performed on the restoration 
meets their approval. Upon receipt of this information 
the work of this committee will come to a close. 

We would at this time like to express our sincere 
gratitude and deep appreciation to our representative in 
the Great and General Court, State and U.S. Govenment 
Employees, Chelmsford Board of Selectmen and all other 
people who in any way helped make the Restoration of 
Crystal Lake possible. 

Respectfully submitted 

Edmund Polubinski 
Chairman 



VARNEY COMMISSION 

The Commssion wishes to report that once again the 
facilities at Varney, received extensive use in 1977, in all 
areas, as to organized activities as well as full utilization 
by children and elders of the community. 

Extensive use was made of the baseball diamond 
throughout the season, the new basketball court has been 
exceptionally well received and well utilized, the two 
tennis courts have been continually in use, and the 
equipment for smaller children has been well received by 
the community. 

Traffic in the playground area continues to be a 
problem, and the Commission requests the utmost caution 
while driving in the area and adherence to the new 
parking regulations, so that all may enjoy the facilities 
without incident. 

We are pleased to report that 1977 was the lowest year 
as to vandalism costs and thus with reduction costs in 
this area and other expense items, approximately 28% 
or over $1900.00 (nineteen hundred dollars) was returned 
to the General Fund. 

The Commission wishes to note that at this time 
meetings are being planned with various town Boards 
and Departments, in view of opening the area for 
swimming at the Lake, so that rules and regulations as 
well as procedures may be implemented for the use of the 
area for Town of Chelmsford residents who are paying 
the funds at this facility. We plan to keep the general 
public aware of these discussions. 

We wish to thank the residents of Chelmsford for their 
consideration and cooperation as well as all the Depart- 
ments of Chelmsford and the Board of Selectmen. 

Respectfully submitted, 

R.C. McManimon, Chairman 

Harry Ayotte 

Bernard Battle 



CABLE TELEVISION 
ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

Activity for the year was limited to a continuing 
review of CATV Industry developments by various 
Committee members. This sector remains quiet with no 
anticipated applications to Chelmsford for service in the 
next year. 

Richard E. Arcand, Chairman 



Ill 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT 
FINANCING AUTHORITY 

Attention: Board of Selectmen 
Subject: Annual Report 

1 . We do not apply for any funds. 

2. We have recieved a request from the New England 
Instrument Co., Alpha Park, Chelmsford to assist 
in a Municipal Bond Float under Massachusetts 
Law Chapter 40-D. We are working on that request 
now. 

3. Our present directors are: 
Walter S. Dronzek - Chairman 
Henrick R.Johnson - Vice Chairman 
Gerald Wallace - Secretary 
Bradford O. Emerson 

4. We are one director short. By law he must be a 
member of the Board of Selectmen. Please make a 
new appointment. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walter S. Dronzek 



INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS 



Senior Clerks 

Catherine Curran 
Nancy Hogan 

sf the Building Inspection 



Local Inspector 

James Sink, CETA Employee 

The following is a report 
Dept. for the year 1977: 

There were 395 Building Permits issued: 

317 Occupancy Permits issued: 

155 Certificates of Inspection issued: 

214 Yard Sale Permit^ issued: 

472 Business Establishments inspected: 



The types of Building Permits issue 

No. Type issued 

151 Dwellings valued at 

154 Additions valued at 

1 1 Remodelings valued at 

32 Swimming Pools valued at 

13 Utility Sheds valued at 

6 Signs valued at 

4 Storage Buildings valued at 

1 Siding valued at 

7 Commercial remodeling valued : 

1 Greenhouses valued at 

2 Barns valued at 

1 Stables valued at 

3 Fireplaces valued at 

4 Garages (unattached) 

5 Demolitions valued at 



\s 



are listed below: 

Est. Value 

$5,128,960.00 

388,058.00 

229,800.00 

109,287.00 

6,354.00 

7,750.00 

78,000.00 

3,000.00 

50,710.00 

3,000.00 

1,075.00 

300.00 

3,400.00 

20,393.00 

9,300.00 



Amount of Salary appropriation for Zoning 
Bylaw Officer and Inspector of Buildings- 
Jan. 1, 1977-January 1, 1978 $17,777.00 

Amount received by the Town of Chelmsford 
for Building Permits: 17,857.00 

Amount received by the Town of Chelmsford 
for Occupancy Permits: 3,875.00 

Amount Received by the Town of Chelmsford 
for Certificate of Inspections: 1 ,906.00 

Amount received by the Town of Chelmsford 
for Yard Sale Permits: 1,085.00 

Total Building Department Budget 1977 - 1978 
Building Inspector's Department $23,256. 

Gas Piping & Fixture Department 5,201. 

Wire Inspector's Department 16,751. 

Total $45,208. 

Total Cost to Operate Building Department $14,894. 

The year 1977 was more eventful and active than the 
previous year of 1976 with Chapter 802 of the State 
Building Code's amendments, plus the addition of 
Architectural Barrier Board, the Energy Program, Wood 
Burning Stoves etc. 

The reorganization of all the Inspectors in one office 
has worked out very well. The office space is still a limited 
question with the State filing system, which is mandatory. 
It is our hope that adequate solutions to the problems can 
be and will be forthcoming. 

The need for help still exists. Court cases have 
increased, the work load has increased. 

As the Inspector of Buildings, I thank all those Town 
Departments that contribute and assist me throughout 
the year so readily. I also thank the townspeople of 
Chelmsford for their past cooperation and look forward 
to serving them in the coming year. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Peter J. McHugh, Jr. 
Inspector of Buildings 



395 Permits with estimated value of 



$6,039,387.00 



112 



TOWN TREASURER 



Balance July 1, 1976 
Receipts to June 30, 1977 

Paid out on Warrants 
Balance June 30, 1977 
(Cash & Investments) 



$ 3,402,051.01 
36,145,542.17 

$39,547,593.18 
37,197,215.69 

$ 2,350,377.49 



TAX COLLECTOR 



Levy of 1973 

Personal Property 

Excise 

Real Estate 

Levy of 1974 

Personal Property 

Excise 

Real Estate 

Levy of 1975 

Personal Property 

Excise 

Real Estate 

Levy of 1976 

Personal Property 

Excise 

Real Estate 

Levy of 1977 

Personal Property 

Excise 

Real Estate 



$ 6,594.83 

46,532.49 



$ 

34,033.83 



$ 9,285.88 

61,112.52 

5,864.33 

$ 10,490.11 
91,244.47 
21,892.03 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1977 

REVENUE ACCOUNTS 
ASSETS 



Cash: 
General: 
In Banks 

Federal Revenue Sharing: 
In Banks 

Antirecession Fiscal Assistance: 
In Banks 

Accounts Receivable: 
Taxes: 
Levy of 1973-74 

Personal Property 
Levy of 1975 

Personal Property 

Real Estate 
Levy of 1976 

Personal Property 

Real Estate 
Levy of 1977 

Personal Property 

Real Estate 



9.285.88 
5.864.37 



10.490.11 
21.892.03 



26.140.68 
240.120.45 



Motor Vehicle Excise: 
Levy of 1973 
Levy of 1974 
Levy of 1975 
levy of 1976 
Levy of 1977 

Farm Excise 

Levy of 1977 

Special Taxes: 

Taxes in Litigation 

Tax Titles & Possessions: 
Tax Titles 
Tax Possessions 



Departmental: 

Off Duty Work Details 
Public Buildings 
Highway 
Cemetery 

Water Districts: 

Liens Added to Taxes 
Levy Of 1977 

Revenue: 

Appropriations 
Voted for Fiscal 1978 



46.532.49 
34.033.83 
61.112.52 
91.244.47 
264.678.68 



35,349.00 
13.117.11 



5,218.04 
825.00 
470.00 

3,384.50 



21.822.223.91 



LIABILITIES AND RESERVES 





In Anticipation of Serial Loans 




$100,000.00 


f 26,140.68 


Payroll Deductions: 




198.643.48 


264,678.68 








240,120.45 


Guarantee Deposits: 








Planning Board 




6,310.00 




Agency: 








State-Registry Fees 


150.00 




77 


State-Entertainment Licenses 


50.00 






County-Sale of Dogs 


12.00 






County-Dog Licenses 


2,125.50 






Recording Fees 


133.00 






Water District-Liens 1977 


1,546.67 


4,017.17 


$1,795,283.47 


Tailings: 








Unclaimed 




2,555.78 


242,858.08 


Trust and Investment Fund Income 








Conservation -Wright 




2,607.08 


68,861.12 


Federal Grants: 








Public Law #92-512 


242,858.08 






Public Law #94-369 


68,861.12 






H.U.D. Community Devel. Pro. 


9.681.15 






School: 








Public #81-874 


254.103.70 






Public Law #90-576 


117.08 






Title I 


1,730.97 






Title II 


.70 






Title IV 


897.43 






Title IVB 


55,509.08 
633.759.31 






Revolving Funds: 








Merrimack Education Center 


300,270.75 




320,387.90 


School Lunch 


67.446.36 





113 



School Athletics 

Appropriation Balances Forward 

Special Project Balances Forward 

Loans Authorized and Unissued 

Sale of Real Estate 

Sale of Cemetery Lots 

Appropriation Control: 
Fiscal 1978 
Revenue 
Transfers 

Aid to Highways: 
State 
County 

Loans Authorized: 
Sewer 

High School 
Crystal Lake 

Transfers Authorized: 

Federal Revenue Sharing Funds: 
Public Law #92-512 

Underestimated Assessments: 
County Tax 



371,753.00 

370,938.83 

348,009.20 

1.505,000.00 

4.517.02 

8,277.50 



21,284,342.31 
537,881.60 



21.822.223.91 



143,937.00 
14,350.00 



1.200,000.00 
100,000.00 
305,000.00 



1.605,000.00 



$26,712,670.09 



Sidewalks 10.332.70 

Sidewalks-Acton Road 46.214.44 



Receipts Reserved for Appropriation: 

Road Machinery Fund 2.841 .60 

State Aid to Libraries 11.787.50 

Highways-Chapter 825 76,373.09 

Crystal Lake Reimbursement 47,324.47 

Reserve Fund-Overlay Surplus 

Overlays Reserved for Abatements: 

Levy of 1973-74 12,726.90 

Levy of 1975 26.284.53 

Levy of 1976 1.583.81 

Levy of 1977 13,764.95 



Revenue Reserved until Collected: 

Motor Vehicle Excise 497 , 60 1 . 99 

Farm Excise 205.50 

Special Tax 10.893.76 

Tax Title & Possessions 48,466. 1 1 

Departmental 9.897.54 

Aid to Highways 1 58 . 287 . 00 



Overestimated Assessments: 

County Hospital 6,363.84 

Special Education 2,656.00 

State Recreation Areas 5,951.70 

Mosquito Control 9,342.00 

Pollution Control 35.33 



138.326.66 
76.885.88 



Appropriations Authorized From: 
Federal Revenue Sharing Funds 
Public Law #92-512 



Surplus Rev 



$26,712,670.09 



TRUST AND INVESTMENT ACCOUNTS 



Custody of Library Trustees: 
Amos F. Adams 
George W. Barris 
Frances Clark 
Clement Fund 
Albert H. Davis 
Frederick B. Edwards 
Nathan B. Edwards 
Victor E. Edwards 
Adams Emerson 
Flint Fund 
George Memorial 
Thomas P. Proctor 
Salina G. Richardson 
Joseph E. Warren 
Gertrude Wright 
Aaron George (Cemetery) 

Custody of Treasurer: 

Barris-Varney Playground 
Barris Memorial-Cemetery 
Barris Fence Fund-Cemetery 
Perpetual Care-Cemetery 
Adams Zmerson 
Conservation Fund 
Stabilization Fund 



Balance 
6-30-76 

19,959.34 

1,774.23 

1,060.38 

14,833.05 

715.18 

11,282.63 

720.84 

2,163.99 

145.69 

3,395.83 

1.992.81 

7,608.55 

389.05 

1,154.22 

595.81 

1,702.48 

1,867.97 

8,033.54 

134.84 

222,260.71 

541.92 

107,278.28 

107,782.20 



New Funds 
& Income 

978.32 

103.71 

3,495.81 

1,033.55 

39.07 

653.76 

42.15 

118.28 

8.51 

198.55 

116.50 

400.03 

22.71 

67.46 

30.12 

99.54 

347.72 

1,400.81 

2.29 

19,872.55 

29.20 

6,316.21 

30,971.78 



Withdrawals 

1,290.00 
2,215.68 

147.76 



4,395.00 

137.13 

17,000.00 



Balance 
6-30 77 

19,647.66 

1,877.94 

2,340.51 

15,866.60 

754.25 
11,788.63 

762.99 
2,282.27 

154.20 
3,594.38 
2,109.31 
8,008.58 

411.76 
1,221.68 

625.93 
1.802.02 



2.215.69 
5,039.35 

225,133.26 

571.12 
113,594.49 
85.490.98 



114 



Custody of Selectmen : 
Emma Gay Varney 
Playground 

Custody of Sinking Fund Commission: 
Sinking Fund 



105.140.33 



Custody of Veteran's Emergency Fund Committee: 

Veteran's Emergency Fund 6,507.42 

TOTALS 629,457.51 



Custody of Treasurer: 

Educational Collaborative 

Board 
Fund GL Chap. 40 Sec. 4-E 



DEBT STATEMENT 



Bond Issue Interest 


Outstanding Payment 


Outstanding 


Principal 


Interest 


Rate 


6-30-76 1977 


6-30-77 


Due 1978 


Due 1978 


High School Issue #1 3.50 


50,000 50,000 


00 


00 


00 


High School #2 3.20 


170,000 85,000 


85,000 


85.000 


2,720 


South Row School 3.50 


225.000 45,000 


180,000 


45,000 


6,300 


1972 High School #1 4.90 


1,200,000 240,000 


960,000 


240,000 


47,040 


1972 High School #2 4.40 


5,950,000 850,000 


5,100,000 


850,000 


205,700 


Junior High School 3.25 


855,000 110,000 


745,000 


110,000 


24,213 


Westland-Harrington Schools 4.30 


1,820,000 160,000 


1,660,000 


160.000 


71,380 


Byam School 6.00 


1,445,000 105,000 


1,340,000 


105,000 


77,250 


TOTAL 


11.715.000 1,645.000 


10,070,000 


1,595.000 


434,603 




REVENUE SHARING FUNDS PL. 


92-512 






Balance July 1, 1976 






88,030.08 




Plus Receipts: 










Entitlements -July 1, 1976 -June 30, 1977 


433,999.00 








Interest -July 1, 1976 -June 30, 1977 


18,761.99 




452.760.99 
540,791.07 











Less Authorized Appropriations 
Fire Dept. Wages 
Sidewalks 
Sidewalks - Acton Rd. 



Plus Funds Returned: 
Fire Dept. Wages 

Appropriations Forward • Fiscal 1978 

Sidewalks 

Sidewalks Acton Rd. 
Balancejune30. 1977 



339,717.53 
12,601.67 
52,800.00 



10,332.70 
46,214.44 



ANTIRECESSION FISCAL ASSISTANCE FUNDS P.L. 94 -369 



Balance July 1. 1976 

Plus Receipts: 

Entitlements -July 1, 1976 -June 30, 1977 
Interest -July 1, 1976 -June 30, 1977 

Balance June 30. 1977 



67,045.00 
1.816.12 



115 



/?7<- ff-i-f 



NON REVENUE ACCOUNTS 



Miscellaneous Protection 



Cash in banks 

Appropriation Balances: 
School Construction 
Crystal Lake Restoration 



DEBT ACCOUNTS 



Net Funded or Fixed Debt: 
Inside Debt Limit: 
General 

Outside Debt Limit: 
General 



Serial Loans: 
Inside Debt Limits: 
General: 
School 

Outside Debt Limit: 
General: 
School 



125,019.67 
118.355.15 



40,000.00 

10,030,000.00 
$10,070,000.00 



10,030,000.00 
$10,070,000.00 



DISBURSEMENTS 



General Government: 
Moderator 
Selectmen 
Accounting 
Treasurer & Collector 
Assessors 
Town Clerk 
Public Buildings 
Law 

Elections 
registrars 

Finance Committee 
Planning Board 
Board of Appeals 
Personnel Board 
Town Forest Com. 
Conservation Commission 
Historical Commission 
Historic District Commission 
Constable 

Home Rule Advisory Com. 
Council on Aging 
Town Celebration Com. 
Bicentennial Celebration Com. 
C.A.T.V. Committee 
Youth Center 
Town Aide 
D.P.W. Committee 

Public Safety: 
Police Department 

Salaries 

Expense & Outlay 

Purchase Cruisers 
Total Police Department 

Fire Department 
Salaries 

Expense & Outlay 
East Station Construction 
Purchase New Pumper 
Total Fire Department 



1976 
300.00 


1977 
300.00 


49,350.93 


57,485.30 


45,725.84 


42,862.36 


88,251.59 


99.403.95 


63,924.89 


66,975.61 


36,676.70 


38.900.29 


27,887.08 


56,825.15 


18,035.37 


25,152.68 


13,235.90 


24,254.32 


14,320.95 


16,746.61 


1.404.23 


1,022.19 


6,701.55 


15,532.38 


3,561.80 


4,439.30 


584.40 


602.86 


104.00 


90.00 


16.341.93 


9,001.36 


896.08 


1,772.57 


395.12 


290.59 


72.00 


120.00 


206.75 


244.62 


8,606.29 


13,710.20 


4.309.31 


2,993.84 


11.800.84 


1,675.58 


34.52 


.00 


24.211.70 


30,742.96 


8.504.89 


9,166.34 


.00 


70.79 


wr, tfff.U 




883,749.29 


946,386.47 


83,080.85 


86,319.31 


21,996.00 


22,756.20 


988,826.14 


1,055,461.98 


904.347.15 


1,078,867.66 


48.219.49 


62,008.77 


66,809.35 


194,924.74 


.00 


75.700.00 



1.019.375 99 1.411,501.17 



Hydrant Service 


51.340.00 


52.640.00 


Tree Warden 


13.833.25 


18.203.92 


Building Inspector 


20.605.72 


21.713.64 


Wire Inspector 


5.807.53 


16.777.70 


Gas Inspector 


3.117.19 


5,087.78 


Plumbing Inspector 


2.455.00 


1.375.00 


Dog Officer 


15.074.93 


14,872.72 


Animal Inspector 


1.100.00 


1.100.00 


Sealer of Weights & Measures 


2,895.20 


2,000.00 


Civilian Defense 


6.381.37 


6.129.15 


Police Outside Detail 


111,960.05 


100,600.18 


Insect Pest Control 


15,017.95 


12.467.00 


Total Miscellaneous Protection 


249.588.19 


252,967.09 


Public Health: 






Salaries & Expenses 


33,404.79 


35,025.15 


Sewer Commission: 






Expenses 


507.60 


846.87 


Consultant Services 


11,700.00 


87,903.03 


Total Sewer Commission 


12,207.60 


88,749.90 


Highway Department: 






Salaries 


290,727.14 


331,845.91 


Utilities 


35,641.02 


32,217.38 


Street Signs 


2,283.87 


3,212.00 


Materials 


77,824.86 


52,213.48 


Misc. Equipment 


1,495.76 


1,487.50 


Machinery Hire 


5,801.00 


3,424.45 


Waste Collection 


370,634.20 


264,357.99 


Machinery Repairs 


31,237.18 


34,564.46 


Snow & Ice 


203,631.81 


242,018.34 


Construction 


47,639.77 


40,802.12 


Chap. 90 Maint. & Construction 


78.632.02 


56,926.85 


Sidewalks 


1.508.06 


28.450.84 


Equipment Purchase 


81.425.37 


27,581.00 


Maint. of Garage 


1.186.65 


864.91 


Clean up Days 


9,549.13 


9,000.00 


Engineer Fees 


9,621.75 


9,869.95 


Gas Tank Installation 


16,390.00 


.00 


Chap. 825 Construction 


.00 


10.476.03 


Total Highway Department 


1.265,299.59 


1,149,313.21 


Street Lighting: 


54,559.87 


68,123.56 


Veteran's Benefits: 






Salaries & Expenses 


11,012.72 


12,774.67 


Cash & Material Grants 


78,542.67 


88,133.56 


Total Veteran's Benefits 


89,555.39 


100,908.23 


Unclassified 




Memorial Day 


1,481.95 


1,500.00 


Town Clock 


494.45 


513.72 


Ambulance Service 


9,999.96 


9,999.96 


Town & Finance Reports 


4,679.68 


6.122.98 


Unpaid Bills - Previous Years 


2,608.07 


2,556.67 


Regional Drug Program 


23,574.96 


23,736.96 


Crystal Lake Reconstruction 


139,119.25 


398,317.92 


Mental Health Program 


8.695.00 


8,695.00 


Liquid Waste Disposal 


600.00 


.00 


Roberts Playground Site Work 


10.373.46 


.00 


Update Town History 


.00 


5.00 


Merrimack Valley Home Center 


1.800.00 


1,800.00 


Library Addition Com. 


6,175.35 


.00 


Central Sq. Eng. Fees 


1,270.24 


333.38 


Water District Consolidation Com. 


6,403.50 


.00 


Police Mutual Aid 


1,497.85 


1,611.65 



116 



Land Purchase - Conservation 
Purchase - Emerson Property 
Restore - Little Red School House 
Water Main Instal. Garrison Rd. 
Wetlands Aerial Mapping 
Bus Trans. Subsidy 
N.M.A.C. Assessment 
Glass Recycling 
Landfill Engineering Plans 
Aerial Mapping 
Survey • East School 
Survey - Ideal Ave. 
Sr. Citizen Drop-In-Center 
Construction 
Total Unclassified 

Agency, Trust & Investment: 
Fees & Licenses-State & County 
Payroll Deductions 
Retirement-Pension Expense 
State & County Assessments 
Cemetery P/C Bequests & Interest 
Tax Levy Refunds 
Performance Bonds 
Trust Funds Invested 
Misc. Trust Funds 
Water District Liens 
Refund-Cemetery Lot Fee 
Refund-Architect Fees 

Total Agency. Trust & Investment 

Interest - Loans: 

Anticipation Loans 

Bonded Debt 
Total Interest 

Principal - Loans: 

Anticipation of Revenue 
Anticipation of Bond Issue 
Maturing Bond Debt 

Total Principal 

School Construction: 

Total Disbursements 
Cash Balance on Hand - June 30 
Total 

Schools: 

School Committee 

Supt. Office 

Supervision 

Principals 

Teachers 

Textbooks 

Library 

Audio-Visual 

Guidance 

School Attendance 

Health Service 

Transportation 

Food Service 

Athletic Program 

Student Activities 

Driver Education 

Health Education 

Custodial 

Utilities 



195,000.00 


21.500.00 


100.000.00 


.00 


6,000.00 


.00 


14,415.76 


2,314.35 


5,000.00 


2,698.65 


30,283.28 


27,999.96 


8.592.00 


8,592.00 


1.333.53 


611.85 


.00 


5,713.37 


.00 


13,013.00 


.00 


2,000.00 


.00 


600.00 


.00 


318.85 


579,398.29 


540,555.27 


7,180.75 


11,824.95 


3,830,368.94 


4,253,303.06 


305,681.84 


419,241.33 


658,020.33 


733,983.58 


29,058.19 


8,674.00 


76.861.65 


82,175.32 


1,420.00 


6.455.00 


25,000.00 


25,000.00 


5,749.91 


4,837.44 


2,791.75 


12,377.03 


.00 


120.00 


.00 


1,500.00 


4,942,133.36 


5,559,991.71 


46,506.73 


18,484.35 


507,962.50 


506,562.00 


554,469.23 


525,046.35 



.00 2,000,000.00 

1,100,000.00 645,000.00 

1,405,000.00 2,190,000.00 

2,505,000.00 4,835,000.00 



27.711,875.99 31,708,845.87 
3,402,051.01 2,350,377.49 



31,113,927.00 


34.059,233.36 


1976 


1977 


32,449.83 


25,559.79 


234,905.94 


235.903.24 


189.900.11 


267,601.54 


578,435.40 


565,625.47 


7,521,328.82 


8,136.520.49 


132,721.13 


104,473.07 


271,716.45 


222,464.95 


132,944.54 


122.463.24 


315,645.52 


341,545.34 


15,569.09 


16,791.33 


75,841.05 


89,176.04 


789,972.65 


651,021.13 


66,243.38 


49,551.61 


107,892.62 


120,168.31 


35,347.23 


28,706.73 


840.00 


.00 


46.792.75 


.00 


564,068.67 


626,033.81 


511,944.85 


566,873.41 



Maint. of Grounds 


29.611.83 


27.280.23 


Maint. of Buildings 


77.787.65 


67.992.36 


Maint. of Equipment 


54.433.60 


55.870.21 


Adult Education 


15.834.27 


18.059.26 


Civic Activities 


22.712.27 


14.614.34 


Programs W/O Schools 


7.711.50 


7.483.15 


Work Study Program 


16.024.78 


19.050.12 


Total School Department 


11.848,675.93 


12.380.829.17 


School Revolving Funds: 






Cafeteria 


596.465.13 


604.383.79 


Athletic 


11.160.13 


18.781.36 


M.E.C. Funds 


519.302.27 


908.193.54 


Title I 


81.605.21 


58.929.03 


Title II 


9,325.68 


6,377.65 


Title III 


87,767.81 


783.35 


Title IV 


6.325.62 


18.607.03 


Educational Collab. Fund 


36.654.90 


.00 


Distributive Ed. 


.00 


14.882.92 


Total Revolving Funds 


1,348.606.75 


1.630.938.67 


Regional Vocational School: 


339,375.34 


411,427.00 


School Building Committee: 


537.60 


219.36 


Libraries: 






Salaries 


120,093.32 


141,352.81 


Repairs & Maint. 


4,241.61 


3,492.50 


Fuel, Light & Water 


9,605.40 


12,017.71 


Books & Periodicals 


43,635.16 


43.997.51 


Other Expense 


7,447.96 


8.017.64 


Outlays 


3,379.85 


2,392.20 


Library Addition 


20,489.50 


991.79 


Total Libraries 


208,892.80 


212,262.16 


Recreation: 






Parks 


24,690.13 


26.745.86 


Varney Playground 


6,963.92 


5,082.98 


Recreation Commission 


107.141.52 


129,671.84 


East School 


4.088.42 


9,690.17 


Recreation Facilities Planning 


50.80 


5.970.00 


Park-New Equip. 


.00 


5.525.00 


Total Recreation 


142,934.84 


182,685.85 


Insurance: 






Property & Liability 


148,466.90 


218,190.92 


Group Insurance 


228,860.33 


277.160.99 


Total Insurance 


377,327.23 


495,351.91 


Cemeteries: 






Salaries 


46,077.05 


51.039.70 


Internments 


4,500.00 


5,000.00 


Labor For Lot Owners 


700.00 


1,000.00 


Repairs. Expense & Outlays 


10,370.10 


12.191.48 


Restore Old Cemeteries 


797.04 


783.85 


Beautification 


13,680.10 


10,537.56 


Garage Construction 


25.000.00 


.00 


Purchase New Equipment 


6.047.00 


4,571.85 


Improv. & Devel. Fund 


.00 


1,983.00 


Total Cemeteries 


107.171.29 


87,107.44 



117 



i c nc 



I in 



General Revenue: 
Taxes: 

Personal Property 

Real Estate 

Farm Animal Excise 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

Tax Title Redemptions 

Lien of Taxes-State Property 
Total Taxes 

Court Fines: 

Permits, Fees & Licenses 
Alcoholic Licenses 
Total Fines & Permits 

Grants & Gifts: 
County: 

Dog Licenses 

Highway Funds 
Total Grants from County 

Federal Government: 

Public Law 874 

Revenue Sharing Funds 

Antirecession Fiscal Assis. 

Comm. Deve. Program H.U.D. 
Total Grants from Fed. Government 

State: 

School Aid & Spec. Education 

School Building Assistance 

School Cafeteria Aid 

Aid to Industrial Schools 

Tuition & Trans, of State Wards 

School Transportation Aid 

Aid to Public Libraries 

Highway - Chapter 90 

Highway • Chapter 81 

Highway - Chapter 825 

Lottery Distribution 

Veteran's Benefits 

Conservation Grant 

Title I 

Title II 

Title III 

Title IV 

Title VI 

Crystal Lake Reimbursement 

Governor's Safety Program 

Census 
Total Grants from State 



Departmental Receipts: 
Selectmen 

Treasurer & Collector 
Town Clerk 
Assessors 

Police Department 
Public Buildings 
Highway 
Dog Officer 
Fire Department 
Veteran's Department 



388,945.21 447,696.60 

10,345,426.74 11,781,146.59 

883.95 701.00 

1,136,166.11 1,322,929.91 

16,540.96 7.919.08 

4,383.68 4.289.04 



11,892,346.65 13,564.682.22 



2,857.45 
68,263.53 
19,482.00 



1.858.55 
59,743.30 
22,570.00 



90,602.98 84,171.85 



4,863.85 
21,175.67 



4.847.39 
7,524.33 



125,205.77 

407,371.00 

.00 

.00 



167,507.69 

433,999.00 

67,045.00 

10,000.00 



532,576.77 678,551.69 



3,936,633.93 

1,082,134.56 

218,435.22 

.00 

422.00 

409,903.00 

11,787.00 

34,327.67 

156,326.47 

150,998.55 

191,792.64 

48,313.14 

72,575.00 

60,660.00 

.00 

.00 

55,509.08 

15,000.00 

592,324.47 

.00 4,432.00 

.00 7,941.50 

7,300,103.73 7,049,516.23 



3,754,746.96 

1,255,356.02 

211,023.69 

21,564.00 

12,078.00 

960,783.18 

11,787.00 

25,193.24 

159,098.35 

229,166.59 

194,146.19 

48,071.51 

.00 

97,363.00 

15,598.45 

220,580.00 

23,547.55 

60,000.00 

.00 



1,476.70 


534.53 


5,014.15 


4,962.00 


710.20 


576.10 


15.00 


136.00 


5,717.26 


7.845.85 


3,090.00 


2,544.50 


7,452.56 


9,025.09 


220.00 


360.00 


376.60 


1,715.00 


1,959.70 


6,318.83 



Misc. Department 
Sale of Town Property 
Glass Recycling 

School: 

Cafeterias - Lunch Sales 

Tuition - Rents & Misc. 
Athletic ProgTam 

Educational Collab. Fund 

M.E.C. Revolving Fund 

Library: 
Fines 

Cemetery: 

Sale of Lots & Graves 

Internments, Labor, Material & 
Use of Equipment 
Total Departmental Receipts 

Municipal Indebtedness: 
Anticipation 

Anticipation of Bond Issue 
Bond Issue-New High School 
Bond Issue-Crystal Lake 

Restoration 
Premium on Bond Issue 

Interest: 

Taxes 

Deposits 

Federal Revenue Sharing 

Antirecession Fiscal Assis. 
Total From Loans & Interest 

Refunds: 

Agency, Trust & Investment: 

Payroll - Withholding 

Cemetery P/C Interest 

Cemetery P/C Bequests 

Dog Licenses Due County 

Sunday Entertainment Licenses 
Due State 

Barris Cemetery Fund 

Conservation Fund 

Douglas Cemetery Fund 

Registry Fees Due State 

Library Trust Funds 

Barris Varney Playground Fund 

Cash in Lieu of Bonds 

Police Outside Details 

Water District Liens 

Veterans Emergency Fund 

Sinking Fund 

Stabilization Fund 
Total Agency, Trust & Investment 

Total Receipts: 

Cash Balance on Hand July 1 . 



23.137.42 319,63 

.00 1.341.55 

1.660.98 1.161.77 



417.764.20 


411,761.32 


27.304.53 


22,926.43 


13,350.88 


18,533.83 


17,525.00 


19,000.00 


401,966.89 


913,357.56 


5.093.48 


5.283.53 


5,785.00 


5,150.00 


9,306.02 


13,424.00 



948.926.57 1.446,277.52 



.00 2,000,000.00 

800,000.00 545,000.00 

1,200,000.00 .00 



.00 


545,000.00 


439.20 


.00 


25.842.09 


31,052.69 


82,227.31 


61,322.53 


10,782.95 


18,761.99 


.00 


1,816.12 


2,119,291.55 


3,202,953.33 



3,857,451.73 4,305,630.03 

10,872.89 17,395.00 

12,705.00 8,674.00 

7,841.30 9.184.30 



1,124.00 


400.00 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


17,480.00 


435.00 


3,062.36 


3,316.79 


933.00 


940.00 


486.85 


3,587.44 


250.00 


250.00 


4,900.00 


6,655.00 


120,831.52 


104,199.92 


2,791.75 


10,433.56 


455.42 


.00 


.00 


2,712.21 


.00 


53,263.00 


4,042,185.82 


4,528,076.25 



27,016,934.11 30,657,172.35 
4,096,992.89 3,402,051.01 
31,113,927.00 34,059,223.36 



118 



TOWN EMPL 


OYEES' SAL7 


LRIES 


Clerk 








Clerk 








Clerk 


Department: Accounting 




Clerk 








Clerk 


Position 


Regular Pay 


Gross Pay 


Clerk 


Town Accountant 


$16,207.48 


$16,207.48 


Clerk 


Senior Clerk 


3,977.26 


3,977.26 


Clerk 


Senior Clerk 


7,767.30 


7,767.30 


Clerk 


Senior Clerk 


8,602.96 


8,602.96 


Clerk 


Senior Clerk 


4,158.82 


4,158.82 


Clerk 
Clerk 


Department: Assessors 






Clerk 


Position 


Regular Pay 


Gross Pay 


Clerk 
Clerk 


Chairman 


$16,592.00 


$16,592.00 


Clerk 


Assessor (Part Time) 


3,983.00 


3,983.00 


Clerk 


Assessor (Part Time) 


3,983.00 


3,983.00 


Clerk 


Senior Clerk 


8,806.50 


8,806.50 


Clerk 


Senior Clerk 


8,806.50 


8,806.50 


Clerk 


Senior Clerk 


8,806.50 


8,806.50 


Clerk 


Senior Clerk 


8,806.50 


8,806.50 


Clerk 
Clerk 


Department: Elections 






Clerk 

Clerk 


Position 




Gross Pay 


Clerk 
Clerk 


Clerk 




$ 49.38 


Clerk 


Clerk 




10.00 


Clerk 


Clerk 




28.75 


Clerk 


Clerk 




28.75 


Clerk 


Clerk 




27.50 


Clerk 


Clerk 




33.75 


Clerk 


Clerk 




10.00 


Clerk 


Clerk 




67.43 


Clerk 


Clerk 




163.04 


Clerk 


Clerk 




21.88 


Clerk 


Clerk 




11.25 


Clerk 


Clerk 




21.88 


Clerk 


Clerk 




61.24 


Clerk 


Clerk 




18.75 


Clerk 


Clerk 




52.50 


Clerk 


Clerk 




10.00 


Clerk 


Clerk 




54.38 


Clerk 


Clerk 




19.37 


Clerk 


Clerk 




42.50 


Clerk 


Clerk 




41.25 


Clerk 


Clerk 




8.75 


Clerk 


Clerk 




95.59 


Clerk 


Clerk 




150.17 


Clerk 


Clerk 




54.38 


Clerk 


Clerk 




63.13 


Clerk 


Clerk 




8.75 


Clerk 


Clerk 




25.00 


Clerk 


Clerk 




57.50 


Clerk 


Clerk 




62.50 


Clerk 


Clerk 




67.50 


Clerk 


Clerk 




16.25 


Clerk 



8.75 
10.00 
12.50 

100.50 
12.50 

195.30 
29.98 
54.38 
44.38 

203.60 
71.25 

109.92 
55.63 
55.00 
18.12 
55.63 
34.38 
8.12 

119.25 

187.50 
45.63 

147.00 
40.54 
38.75 
31.88 
45.63 
67.75 
12.50 
73.61 

139.28 
12.50 
12.50 
82.50 

276.99 
36.88 
53.13 
70.50 

247.13 
55.62 
40.00 
12.50 
42.50 
10.00 

119.08 
48.52 

159.48 
7.50 

126.24 
28.75 
42.50 
10.00 
10.00 
26.25 
22.00 
10.00 

158.92 

74.94 

42.50 



119 



Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 



54.38 
10.00 
65.63 
10.00 
123.75 
21.88 
116.25 
34.12 
10.00 
7.50 
47.50 
8.12 
70.50 
40.59 
123.65 
49.38 
8.12 
153.78 
7.50 
21.25 
16.25 
7.50 
151.55 
28.75 
101.82 
58.75 
23.75 
35.00 
82.46 
7.50 
90.00 
7.50 
25.00 
31.25 
40.00 
83.19 
23.75 
105.63 
38.13 
10.00 
73.75 
10.00 
20.00 
39.37 
10.00 
11.25 
7.50 
7.50 
62.50 
8.75 
131.57 
103.81 
10.00 
76.75 
82.50 
10.00 
8.75 
35.00 



Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Clerk 

Department: Park 

Position 

Superintendent 
P.T. Landscaper 
P.T. Laborer 
P.T. Laborer 
P.T. laborer 
P.T. Laborer 



Department: Health 

Position 

Director 
Member 
Member 
Member 
Town Physician 
Senior Clerk 
Director 
Member 
Member 
Member 
Town Physician 
Senior Clerk 



Regular Pay 

$19,260.00 

294.00 

270.00 

264.00 

1,000.00 

8,468.00 

19,260.00 

294.00 

270.00 

264.00 

1,000.00 

8,468.00 



138.26 
20.00 
44.66 
27.50 
16.25 
54.38 
10.00 
38.75 
48.00 

121.00 

110.62 
22.50 
10.00 
50.62 
21.88 
45.00 
10.00 
36.87 
30.00 
54.38 
87.23 

141.00 
46.25 
38.75 

200.25 
11.25 
40.00 
45.00 
34.38 
30.00 



Gross Pay 

$14,675.94 

3,206.77 

2,265.27 

159.64 

142.60 

38.30 



Gross Pay 

$19,260.00 

294.00 

270.00 

264.00 

1,000.00 

8,468.00 

19,260.00 

294.00 

270.00 

264.00 

1,000.00 

8,468.00 



120 



Department: Recreation Commission 

Position Regular Pay Gross Pay 

Director of Summer Program $1,700.00 $1,700.00 

Playground Director 540.00 540.00 

Playground Director 540.00 540.00 

Playground Director 540.00 540.00 

Playground Director 540.00 540.00 

Playground Director 540.00 540.00 

Playground Director 540.00 540.00 

Playground Director 480.00 480.00 

Playground Supervisor 560.00 560.00 

Playground Supervisor 720.00 720.00 

Playground Supervisor 630.00 630.00 

Playground Supervisor 420.00 420.00 

Playground Supervisor 420.00 420.00 

Playground Supervisor 420.00 420.00 

Playground Supervisor 420.00 420.00 

Playground Supervisor 420.00 420.00 

Sports Instructor 800.00 800.00 

Sports Instructor 600.00 600.00 

Sports Instructor 600.00 600.00 

Sports Instructor 450.00 450.00 

Sports Instructor 100.00 100.00 

Sports Instructor 100.00 100.00 

Sports Instructor 350.00 350.00 

Sports Instructor 263.00 263.00 

Sports Instructor 217.50 217.50 

Playground Instructor 960.00 960.00 

Administrative Ass't/Clerk 3,948.72 3,948.72 

Department: Town Hall 

Position Gross Pay 

Historic District Commission Clerk $ 97 . 90 

Historic District Commission Clerk 1 09 . 44 

Sewer Commission Clerk 19.58 

Sewer Commission Clerk 304 . 94 

Planning Board Clerk 3,281 .33 

Moderator 300.00 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 2 , 000 . 00 

Town Counsel 250.00 



Supt. of Insect & Pest Control 

Building Inspector 

Appeals Board Clerk 

Recreation Commission Clerk 

Finance Committee Clerk 

Finance Committee Clerk 

Personnel Board Clerk 

Plumbing Inspector 

Home Rule Advisory Comittee Clerk 

Constable 

Gas Inspector 

Conservation Commission Clerk 

Conservation Commission Clerk 

Wiring Inspector 

Veterans' Agent 

Clerk of Works-School Building Committee 

Dog Officer 

Assistant Dog Officer 

Custodian 

Town Aide 

Recreation Director 



Department: Treasurer-Tax Collector 



Position 

Treasurer-Collector 
Asst. Treasurer 
Senior Clerk 
Senior Clerk 
Senior Clerk 
Senior Clerk 
P.T. Clerk 
P.T. Clerk 
P.T. Clerk 



Regular Pay 

$18,287 
9,841 
8,266 
8,603 
8,603 
8,603 
3,973 
3,514 
568 



Department: Veterans' Services 
Position Regular Pay 

Veterans' Agent $10,736.80 



2,050.00 

17,365.67 

2,135.75 

3,948.60 

17.10 

128.16 

520.17 

1,985.00 

193.94 

24.00 

3,750.00 

2,562.13 

164.65 

14,222.57 

10,769.55 

8,800.00 

7,534.67 

6,027.17 

7,374.84 

8,752.76 

114.66 



Gross Pay 

$18,287 
9,841 
8,266 
8,603 
8,603 
8,603 
3,973 
3,514 
568 



Gross Pay 

$10,736.80 



Department: School 



121 



Position 


Regular Pay 


Overtime Pay 


Administration 






Superintendent 


$38,762.36 




Asst. Supt. 


30,022.93 




Dir. of Personnel 


16,096.00 




Dir. of Spec. Services 


26,498.81 




Dir. of School Management 


22,690.32 




Attendance Officer 


17,499.15 




Supervisors 






Foreign Language 


17,642.50 




Guidance 


21,649.17 




Art 


19,666.27 




Career Ed. 


16,704.50 




Music 


21,649.17 




Coord, of Science 


22,946.88 




Coord, of Math 


19,330.57 




Coord, of Social Studies 


20,880.78 




Asst. Coord, of LA in charge of Reading 


18,622.24 




Coord, of LA 


21,833.37 




Coord, of PE 


22,340.40 




High School Administration 






Principal 


27,204.13 




Asst. Principal 


24,805.24 




Dean 


19,299.01 




Dean 


19,299.01 




Dean 


19,299.01 




High School Teachers 






Reading 


16,854.76 




Reading 


17,472.00 




English 


13,639.12 




English 


13,639.12 




English 


13,516.18 




English 


17,004.76 




English 


15,500.94 




English 


15,800.98 




English 


9,603.18 




English 


12,069.42 




English 


13,291.18 




English 


12,733.76 




English 


11,975.36 




English 


9,453.18 




English 


11,023.54 




English 


17,154.80 




English 


5,682.88 




English 


11,573.54 




English 


14,784.00 




English 


1,396.95 




English 


3,953.00 




English 


9,453.18 




English 


12,830.74 




English 


13,645.84 




English 


7,709.50 




English 


9,075.64 





Other 


Gross Pay 




$38,762.36 




30,022.93 




16,096.00 




26,498.81 




22,690.32 




17,499.15 




17,642.50 




21,649.17 




19,666.27 




16,704.50 




21,649.17 




22,946.88 




19,330.57 




20,880.78 




18,622.24 




21,833.37 




22,340.40 




27,204.13 




24,805.24 




19,299.01 




19,299.01 




19,299.01 




16,854.76 




17,472.00 


2,304.64 


15,943.76 


2,479.84 


16,118.96 


2,420.76 


15,936.94 




17,004.76 




15,500.94 




15,800.98 


1,718.76 


11,321.94 


2,230.44 


14,299.86 


2,384.76 


15,675.94 


27.00 


12,760.76 


2,145.52 


14,120.88 


1,718.76 


11,171.94 


2,004.28 


13,027.82 




17,154.80 


1,623.68 


7,306.56 


2,079.28 


13,652.82 


2,688.00 


17,472.00 




1,396.95 




3,953.00 


1,718.76 


11,171.94 


2,289.68 


15,120.42 




13,645.84 


1,991.42 


9,700.92 


2,593.04 


11,668.68 



122 



English 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Science 

Soc 

Soc 

Soc 

Soc 

Soc 

Soc 

Soc 

Soc 

Soc 

Soc 

Soc 

Soc 

Soc 

Soc 

Soc 

Soc 

Soc 



ial Studies 

ial Studies 

ial Studies 

ial Studies 

ial Studies 

ial Studies 

ial Studies 

ial Studies 

ial Studies 

ial Studies 

ial Studies 

ial Studies 

ial Studies 

ial Studies 

ial Studies 

ial Studies 

ial Studies 
Home Economics 
Home Economics 
Industrial Arts 
Industrial Arts 
Industrial Arts 
Industrial Arts 
Industrial Arts 
Work Study 
Librarian 
Librarian 

Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Distributive Education 
Business 
Business 



6,452.22 
13,116.18 

1,948.40 

6,450.12 

8,407.30 
10,335.90 

8,807.30 
16,854.76 

4,198.72 
14,175.02 

9,563.24 

9,453.18 
14,261.72 
12,918.24 
14,501.72 
13,370.06 
13,116.18 
13,731.36 
16,287.94 
14,515.60 
15,957.96 

9,453.18 
15,515.60 
14,461.72 

1,076.58 
14,684.66 
14,261.72 

5,786.18 
16,211.20 
15,253.96 

8,941.00 
10,741.96 

9,574.60 
13,639.12 
11,546.48 
14,261.72 

5,682.88 
13,394.16 
13,116.18 
13,609.62 
14,784.00 
14,301.72 
13,116.18 
13,601.92 
15,711.72 

4,198.72 
11,403.86 
13,639.12 

9,977.00 
17,472.00 
14,261.72 
14,261.72 
14,261.72 
14,261.72 
12,768.24 
12,593.24 
14,715.60 
13,345.24 



1,764.92 


8,217.14 


2,384.76 


15,500.94 




1,948.40 


-253.15 


6,196.97 


1,528.60 


9,935.90 




10,335.90 


1,528.60 


10,335.90 


-474.75 


16,380.01 




4,198.72 


354.00 


14,529.02 


1,623.68 


11,186.92 


1,718.76 


11,171.94 


2,593.04 


16,854.76 


2,289.68 


15,207.92 


2,593.04 


17,094.76 


2,430.92 


15,800.98 


2,384.76 


15,500.94 


2,479.84 


16,211.20 


421.20 


16,709.14 


2,639.20 


17,154.80 




15,957.96 


1,718.76 


11,171.94 


2,639.20 


18,154.80 


2,593.04 


17,054.76 


27.00 


1,103.58 


2,384.76 


17,069.42 


2,593.04 


16,854.76 


246.02 


6,032.20 




16,211.20 


2,593.04 


17,847.00 


2,526.00 


11,467.00 


1,801.16 


12,543.12 


1,745.76 


11,320.36 


2,479.84 


16,118.96 


2,099.36 


13,645.84 


2,593.04 


16,854.76 


1,623.68 


7,306.56 




13,394.16 


2,384.76 


15,500.94 


2,335.84 


15,945.46 


2,688.00 


17,472.00 


2,593.04 


16,894.76 


2,384.76 


15,500.94 


2,407.82 


16,009.74 


2,593.04 


18,304.76 


36.00 


4,234.72 


2,049.28 


13,453.14 


2,479.84 


16,118.96 


1,639.76 


11,616.76 




17,472.00 


2,593.04 


16,854.76 


2,611.04 


16,872.76 


2,593.04 


16,854.76 


2,620.04 


16,881.76 


2,289.68 


15,057.92 


2,289.68 


14, .882.92 


2,639.20 


17,354.80 


2,289.68 


15,634.92 



123 



Business 

Business 

Business 

Business 

Business 

Business 

Business 

Foreign Language 

Foreign Language 

Foreign Language 

Foreign Language 

Foreign Language 

Foreign Language 

Foreign Language 

Foreign Language 

Foreign Language 

Foreign Language 

Foreign Language 

Foreign Language 

Foreign Language 

Foreign Language 

Foreign Language 

Math 

Math 

Math 

Math 

Math 

Math 

Math 

Math 

Math 

Math 

Math 

Math 

Math 

Math 

Math 

Math 

Math 

Music 

Music 

Music 

Music 

Art 

Art 

Art 

Phys. Ed. 

Phys. Ed. 

Phys. Ed. 

Phys. Ed. 

Phys. Ed. 

Phys. Ed. 

Phys. Ed. 

Phys. Ed. 

Phys. Ed. 

Parker Jun ior High 

Principal 
Asst. Principal 



14,704.84 

10,353.18 

11,546.48 

15,500.94 

16,870.76 

15,500.94 

8,158.48 

15,223.86 

10,728.92 

3,193.82 

12,187.32 

7,883.48 

9,355.24 

7,347.76 

12,847.12 

13,033.40 

14,590.60 

10,499.72 

11,023.54 

12,069.42 

10,117.88 

3,197.70 

9,977.00 

17,431.12 

13,645.84 

17,018.96 

11,646.48 

5,350.10 

3,628.00 

14,261.72 

14,611.72 

7,176.54 

13,302.82 

12,069.42 

11,996.48 

11,800.36 

11,546.48 

12,875.41 

8,930.24 

8,929.44 

11,088.80 

12,658.76 

15,094.92 

15,500.94 

11,023.54 

12,593.24 

18,798.67 

13,962.30 

12,423.25 

14,016.18 

15,084.22 

12,546.48 

6,074.92 

17,719.72 

13,206.48 

26,512.62 
23,055.74 



1,718.76 

2,099.36 

-84.24 



1,433.36 



156.00 
2,593.04 
1,433.36 
1,451.63 
2,099.36 
2,335.84 
2,289.68 
2,639.20 
1,945.04 
2,004.28 
2,194.44 



1,814.00 
23.06 
65.00 

2,099.36 
1,528.60 

2,593.04 
2,593.04 
2,050.44 

2,194.44 
2,099.36 
2,145.52 
2^99.36 
2,194.44 
1,623.68 
2,479.84 
1,908.64 

2,593.04 

2,004.28 
2,289.68 

2,538.60 
1,814.00 
2,384.76 
2,593.04 
2,099.36 
795.44 
2,593.04 
2,099.36 



14.704.84 
12.071.94 
13,645.84 
15,416.70 
16,870.76 
15,500.94 

9.591.84 
15,223.86 
10,728.92 

3,349.82 
14,780.36 

9.316.84 
10,806.87 

9,447.12 
15,182.96 
15,323.08 
17,229.80 
12,444.76 
13,027.82 
14,263.86 
10,117.88 

3,197.70 
11,791.00 
17,454.18 
13,710.84 
17,018.96 
13,745.84 

6,878.70 

3,628.00 
16,854.76 
17,204.76 

9,226.98 
13,302.82 
14,263.86 
14,095.84 
13,945.88 
13,645.84 
15,069.85 
10,553.92 
11,409.28 
12,997.44 
12,658.76 
17,687.96 
15,500.94 
13,027.82 
14,882.92 
18,798.67 
16,500.90 
14,237.25 
16,400.94 
17,677.26 
14,645.84 

6,870.36 
20,312.76 
15.305.84 

26,512.62 
23,055.74 



124 



Parker - Teachers 

English 13,676.62 

English 2,432.22 

English 12,593.24 

English 12,593.24 

English 9,516.84 

English 9,453.18 

English 12,069.42 

English 14,261.72 

English 2,866.72 

English 11,237.94 

English 3,434.52 

Reading 14,261.72 

Reading 11,546.48 

Reading 13,116.18 

Foreign Language 4,388.88 

Foreign Language 10,499.72 

Foreign Language 12,069.42 

Foreign Language 11,500.72 

Foreign Language 11,023.54 

Foreign Language 13,783.18 

Math 9,280.24 

Math 11,903.92 

Math 14,261.72 

Math 10,499.72 

Math 11,023.54 

Math 11,546.48 

Math 12,593.24 

Math 12,593.24 

Music 9,080.24 

Musk 10,649.72 

Music 14,661.72 

Art 8,407.30 

Art 5,350.10 

Art 9,453.18 

Physical Education 18,154.76 

Physical Education 14,835.42 

Physical Education 10,085.92 

Physical Education 446.52 

Physical Education 15,075.47 

Science 16,124.18 

Science 11,268.76 

Science 14,359.12 

Science 16,854.76 

Science 14,882.92 

Science 13,116.18 

Science 9,030.24 

Science 16,854.76 

Science 12,169.42 

Science 15,500.94 

Science 13,116.18 

Social Studies 4.388.88 



2,499.34 


16,175.96 




2,432.22 


2,289.68 


14,882.92 


2,289.68 


14,882.92 




9,516.84 


1,718.76 


11,171.94 


2,194.44 


14,263.86 


2,593.04 


16,854.76 




2,866.72 




11,237.94 


397.64 


3,832.16 


2,593.04 


16,854.76 


2,099.36 


13,645.84 


2,384.76 


15,500.94 


1,320.12 


5,709.00 


1,909.04 


12,408.76 


2,194.44 


14,263.86 


2,099.36 


13,600.08 


1,933.48 


12,957.02 


2,384.76 


16,167.94 


1,623.68 


10,903.92 




11,903.92 


2,593.04 


16,854.76 


1,916.08 


12,415.80 


1,004.28 


13,027.82 


2,099.36 


13,645.84 


2,289.68 


14,882.92 


2,289.68 


14,882.92 


1,623.68 


10,703.92 


1,909.04 


12,558.76 


2,593.04 


17,254.76 


1,528.60 


9,935.90 


1,528.60 


6,878.70 


1,718.76 


11,171.94 




18,154.76 


2,194.44 


17,029.86 


2,095.10 


12,181.02 




446.52 


2,593.04 


17,668.51 




16,124.18 


2,004.28 


13,273.04 


2,479.84 


16,838.96 




16,854.76 




14,882.92 


2,384.76 


15,500.94 


1,623.68 


10,653.92 




16,854.76 


2,194.44 


14,363.86 




15,500.94 


2,216.28 


15,332.46 




4,388.88 



125 



Social Studies 13,116.18 

Social Studies 13,116.18 

Social Studies 13,116.18 

Social Studies 1,558.36 

Social Studies 12,069.42 

Social Studies 17,655.00 

Social Studies 17,661.90 

Social Studies 12,069.42 

Home Economics 10,053.18 

Home Economics 10,185.90 

Home Economics 12,069.42 

Industrial Arts 9,453.18 

Industrial Arts 14,261.72 

Industrial Arts 9,155.24 

Librarian 13,639.12 

Guidance Counselor 8,930.24 

Guidance Counselor 8,930.24 

Guidance Counselor 11,199.72 

McCarthy Junior High 

Principal 26,389.16 

Asst. Principal 23,179.20 

McCarthy - Teachers 

English 8,935.46 

English 4,394.10 

English 12,074.64 

English 17,017.98 

English 15,361.72 

English 12,069.42 

English 9,977.00 



English 2,866.72 

English 12,069.42 

English 9,874.98 

English 13,639.12 

English 12,783.40 

English 14,261.72 

English 11,791.00 

English 11,546.48 

Reading 10,504.94 

Reading 14,386.72 

Reading 9,977.00 

Reading 12,069.42 

Foreign Language 3,633.22 

Foreign Language 5,016.76 

Foreign Language 13,033.04 

Foreign Language 11,028.76 

Foreign Language 4,008.56 

Foreign Language 6,878.70 

Foreign Language 11,546.48 

Foreign Language 10,499.72 

Foreign Language 11,171.94 



2,384.76 


15,500.94 


2,384.76 


15,500.94 


2,384.76 


15,500.94 


13.00 


1,571.36 


2,194.44 


14,263.86 




17,655.00 




17,661.90 


1,806.84 


13,876.26 


1,475.92 


11,529.10 




10,185.90 


2,194.44 


14,263.86 


1,718.76 


11,171.94 


2,593.04 


16,854.76 


1,623.68 


10,778.92 


2,479.84 


16,118.96 


1,623.68 


10,553.92 


1,623.68 


10,553.92 


1,909.04 


13,108.76 




26,389.16 




23,179.20 


1,623.68 


10,559.14 




4,394.10 


1,961.88 


14,036.52 




17,017.98 


2,793.04 


18,154.76 


2,194.44 


14,263.86 


1,814.00 


11,791.00 


-50.63 


2,816.09 


2,194.44 


14,263.86 




9,874.98 


2,479.84 


16,118.96 


2,289.68 


15,073.08 


2,593.04 


16,854.76 




11,791.00 


2,099.36 


13,645.84 


1,909.04 


12,413.98 


2,593.04 


16,979.76 


1,814.00 


11,791.00 


2,194.44 


14,263.86 




3,633.22 


1,382.73 


6,399.49 




13,033.04 


2,004.28 


13,033.04 




4,008.56 




6,878.70 


2,099.36 


13,645.84 


1,909.04 


12,408.76 




11,171.04 



126 



Math 15,590.40 

Math 15,277.24 

Math 13,651.06 

Math 13,644.34 

Math 12,251.70 

Math 7,883.48 

Math 4,388.88 

Math 14,789.40 

Math 14,261.72 

Math 11,023.54 

Math 8,407.30 

Math 1,791.70 

Math 863.22 

Music 14,413.86 

Music 10,308.40 

Music 10,553.92 

Art 11,150.50 

Art 8,457.30 

Physical Education 12,751.70 

Physical Education 15,506.16 

Physical Education 15,112.97 

Physical Education 12,330.23 

Science 14,263.86 

Science 17,590.97 

Science 14,261.72 

Science 9,458.40 

Science 13,121.40 

Science 17,420.76 

Science 13,116.18 

Science 14,039.12 

Science 8,930.24 

Science 12,408.76 

Science 18,970.92 

Science 11,299.72 



Soc 
Soc 
Soc 
Soc 
Soc 
Soc 
Soc 
Soc 
Soc 
Soc 
Soc 
Soc 
Soc 
Soc 
Soc 



al Studies 11,049.26 

al Studies 13,116.18 

al Studies 15,064.22 

al Studies 2,294.60 

al Studies 13,027.82 

al Studies 7,883.48 

al Studies 7,766.86 

al Studies 11,546.48 

al Studies 8,383.48 

al Studies 7,014.98 

al Studies 14,685.00 

al Studies 1,504.70 

al Studies 5,682.88 

al Studies 2,866.72 

al Studies 11,546.48 



Home Economics 12,074.64 

Home Economics 8,557.30 

Home Economics 8,407.30 

Home Economics 11,173.54 





15.590.40 


2,777.68 


18.054.92 




13.651.06 


2,217.04 


15,861.38 


2,099.36 


14,351.06 


1,433.36 


9,316.84 




4,388.88 




14,789.40 


2,593.04 


16,854.76 


2,004.28 


13,027.82 


1,538.60 


9,935.90 




1,791.70 




863.22 




14,413.86 


-277.26 


10,031.14 




10,553.92 


295.70 


11,446.20 


1,528.60 


9,985.90 


2,099.36 


14,851.06 




15,506.16 


2,593.04 


17,706.01 


2,099.36 


14,429.59 




14,263.86 


247.00 


17,837.97 


2,593.04 


16,854.76 


1,718.76 


11,177.16 


2,440.01 


15,561.41 




17,420.76 


2,387.76 


15,513.94 


2,479.84 


16,518.96 


1,623.68 


10,553.92 


-67.44 


12,341.32 




18,970.92 


1,909.04 


13,208.76 


-64.08 


10,985.18 


2,384.76 


15,500.94 


2,688.00 


17,752.22 


605.20 


2,699.80 




13,027.82 


1,433.36 


9,316.84 


112.58 


7,879.44 


2,099.36 


13,645.84 


1,433.36 


9,816.84 


2,004.28 


9,019.26 


2,670.00 


17,355.00 


-71.34 


1,433.36 


1,623.68 


7,306.56 




2,866.72 


1,951.04 


13,497.52 


2,194.44 


14,269.08 


1,528.60 


10,085.90 


1,528.60 


9,935.90 


2,004.28 


13,177.82 



127 



Industrial Arts 
Industrial Arts 
Industrial Arts 
Industrial Arts 
Industrial Arts 

Librarian 

Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 



5,350.10 
2,589.72 

13,116.18 
8,639.80 

11,246.94 

11,546.48 

11,023.54 
14,261.72 
14,784.00 



1,528.60 


6.878.70 


50.63 


2,640.35 


2,384.76 


15,500.94 


1,528.50 


10,168.40 


52.00 


11,298.94 


2,099.36 


13,645.84 


2,040.28 


13,063.82 


2,593.04 


16,854.76 


2,688.00 


17,472.00 



Byam School 
Principal 

Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 

McFarlin School 
Principal 

Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 



24,805.24 

10,753.60 

6,802.50 

11,023.54 

9,977.00 

11,546.48 

12,847.12 

12,329.32 

6,230.43 

9,977.00 

5,016.76 

12,069.42 

16,854.76 

10,597.29 

11,023.54 

12,085.70 

11,208.02 

13,027.82 

572.42 

11,023.54 

3,149.04 

12,593.24 

10,553.92 

8,999.42 

15,182.96 

10,499.72 

11,546.48 

11,791.00 

11,615.66 

11,615.66 

13,645.84 

13,162.34 



24,805.24 

8,930.24 

6,015.66 

14,261.72 

14,261.72 

5,682.88 

14,263.86 

10,799.72 

8,930.24 

7,014.98 





24,805.24 


1,955.20 


12,708.80 


1,680.90 


8,483.40 


2,004.28 


13,027.82 


1,814.00 


11,791.00 


2,099.36 


13,645.84 


2,335.84 


15,182.96 


2,145.52 


14,474.84 


1,043.86 


7,274.29 


1,814.00 


11,791.00 


1,433.36 


6,450.12 


2,116.92 


14,186.34 




16,854.76 


114.70 


10,811.99 


1,862.68 


12,886.22 


-23.06 


12,062.64 


1,767.20 


12,975.22 




13,027.82 


833.34 


1,405.76 


2,004.28 


13,027.82 


364.88 


3,513.92 


2,289.68 


14,882.92 




10,553.92 


1,646.74 


10,646.16 




15,182.96 


1,909.04 


12,408.76 


1,099.36 


13,745.84 




11,791.00 


2,122.42 


13,738.08 


2,122.42 


13,738.08 


-370.80 


13,275.04 


2,384.76 


15,547.10 




24,805.24 


1,623.68 


10,553.92 


1,718.76 


7,734.42 


2,625.54 


16,887.26 


2,593.04 


16,854.76 


1,623.68 


7,306.56 




14,263.86 


1,909.04 


12,708.76 


1,623.68 


10,553.92 


2,004.28 


9,019.26 



128 



Teacher 15,500.94 

Teacher 9,723.18 

Teacher 12,408.76 

Highland School 

Teacher 10,499.72 

Teacher 13,726.72 

Teacher 11,403.86 

Teacher 14,353.96 

Center School 

Principal 24,805.24 

Teacher 8,930.24 

Teacher 13,116.18 

Teacher 11,023.54 

Teacher 12,662.42 

Teacher 1,909.04 

Teacher 13,116.18 

Teacher 2,721.00 

Teacher 5,682.88 

Teacher 13,116.18 

Teacher 14,261.72 

Teacher 15,500.94 

Teacher 12,593.24 

Teacher 15,500.94 

Teacher 15,500.94 

Teacher 12,069.42 

Teacher 13,639.12 

Teacher 6,596.96 

Teacher 14,784.00 

Teacher 10,499.72 

Teacher 14,261.72 

Teacher 13,645.84 

Teacher 14,261.72 

Teacher 8,930.24 

Teacher 13,216.18 

Teacher 13,116.18 

Harrington School 

Principal 24,805.24 

Teacher 11,791.00 

Teacher 14,261.72 

Teacher 15,500.94 

Teacher 14,615.60 

Teacher 11,931.50 

Teacher 5,350.10 

Teacher 14,032.96 

Teacher 9,453.18 

Teacher 13,027.82 

Teacher 13,116.18 

Teacher 7,709.50 

Teacher 12,069.42 

Teacher 11,791.00 

Teacher 9,977.00 

Teacher 11,023.54 

Teacher 11,171.94 





15,500.94 


1,718.76 


11,441.94 




12,408.76 


1,909.04 


12,408.76 


2,479.84 


16,206.56 


2,004.28 


13,408.14 


2,593.04 


16,947.00 




24,805.24 


1,623.68 


10,553.92 


2,132.04 


15,248.22 


2,004.28 


13,027.82 


2,312.74 


14,975.16 




1,909.04 


2,384.76 


15,500.94 


635.72 


3,356.72 


1,623.68 


7,306.56 


2,384.76 


15,500.94 


2,593.04 


16,854.76 




15,500.94 


2,349.80 


14,943.04 




15,500.94 




15,500.94 


2,194.44 


14,263.86 


2,479.84 


16,118.96 


1,433.36 


8,030.32 


2,688.00 


17,472.00 


1,909.04 


12,408.76 


2,593.04 


16,854.76 


-222.48 


13,423.36 


2,593.04 


16,854.76 


1,623.68 


10,553.92 


2,384.76 


15,600.94 


2,384.76 


15,500.94 




24,805.24 




11,791.00 


2,593.04 


16,854.76 




15,500.94 


2,639.20 


17,254.80 


516.16 


12,447.66 


1,408.85 


6,758.95 




14,032.96 


1,718.76 


11,171.94 




13,027.82 


2,384.76 


15,500.94 




7,709.50 


2,194.44 


14,263.86 




11,791.00 


1,814.00 


11,791.00 


2,004.28 


13,027.82 




11,171.94 



129 

Teacher 11,800.36 2,145.52 13,945.88 

Teacher 11,791.00 11.791.00 

Teacher 17,154.80 17,154.80 

Teacher 9,935.90 9.935.90 

Teacher 6,878.70 6,878.70 

Teacher 12,662.42 2,312.74 14.975.16 

Teacher 10,499.72 1,922.04 12,421.76 

Teacher 11,876.48 2,099.36 13,975.84 

Teacher 10,499.72 1,909.04 12,408.76 

Teacher 8,930.24 1,623.68 10,553.92 

Teacher 6,315.88 1,623.68 7,939.56 

Teacher 13,027.82 13,027.82 

Teacher 9,977.00 1.814.00 11,791.00 

North School 



Principal 

Teacher 13,027.82 -70.80 12,957.02 

Teacher 15,500.94 -42.12 15,458.82 

Teacher 15,500.94 15,500.94 

Teacher 11,791.00 11,791.00 

Teacher 10,731.42 1,822.66 12,554.08 

Teacher 11,023.54 2,004.28 13,027.82 

Teacher 13,645.84 13,645.84 

Teacher 12,069.42 2,194.44 14,263.86 

Teacher 15,500.94 15,500.94 

Teacher 14,923.36 14,923.36 

Teacher 11,023.54 2,004.28 13,027.82 

Teacher 15,500.94 15,500.94 

Teacher 15,500.94 15,500.94 

Teacher 12,069.42 2,104.44 14,263.86 

Teacher 13,116.18 2,300.52 15,416.70 

Teacher 11,023.54 2,004.28 13,037.82 

Teacher 13,116.18 2,384.76 15,500.94 

Teahcer 11,023.54 2,004.28 13,027.82 

Teacher 13,116.18 2,384.76 15,500.94 

Teacher 12,593.24 2,289.68 14,882.92 

Teacher 13,116.18 2,384.76 15,500.94 
Teacher 

South Row School 



Principal 24,805.24 

Teacher 13,116.18 

Teacher 15,917.50 

Teacher 13,027.82 

Teacher 16,854.76 

Teacher 14,261.72 

Teacher 13,216.18 

Teacher 12,069.42 

Teacher 14,882.92 

Teacher 13,116.18 

Teacher 15,600.94 

Teacher 8,930.24 

Teacher 15,500.94 

Teacher 12,069.42 

Teacher 14,263.86 

Teacher 12,755.00 

Teacher 16,854.76 





24,805.24 


2,300.52 


15,416.70 


084.24 


15,833.26 




13,027.82 




16,854.76 


2,593.04 


16,854.76 


2,384.76 


15,600.94 


2,194.44 


14,263.86 




14,882.92 


2,384.76 


15,500.94 




15,600.94 


1,623.68 


10,553.92 




15,500.94 


2.194.44 


14,263.86 




14,263.86 


2,289.68 


15,044.68 




16,854.76 



130 



Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 

Westlands School 
Principal 

Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 

Elementary 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 

Art Teacher 
Art Teacher 
Art Teacher 
Art Teacher 
Art Teacher 
Art Teacher 

Music Teacher 
Music Teacher 
Music Teacher 



14,261.72 

15,964.26 

13,116.18 

5,249.86 



24,805.24 

11,546.48 
13,116.18 

9,539.04 
13,116.18 
12,593.24 
13,116.18 
13,745.84 
14,261.72 

4,172.98 
16,854.76 
10,499.72 
12,593.24 
15,500.94 
13,116.18 
13,116.18 
13,116.18 
17,885.70 
13,116.18 
13,116.18 
13,116.18 
11,546.48 

9,264.78 
13,239.68 

8,618.19 
10,499.72 
12,755.00 
12,775.98 

8,346.66 
12,593.24 
13,216.18 
13,116.18 

7,306.56 



14,848.00 
4,988.50 

14,784.00 
4,937.40 
1,390.92 

13,639.12 

8,407.30 
13,116.18 
11,023.54 
10,499.72 
13,116.18 
15,500.94 

11,403.86 
8,930.24 
8,930.24 



2,593.04 


16,854.76 


336.96 


16,301.22 


2,384.76 


15,500.94 


954.52 


6.204.38 




24,805.24 


2,099.36 


13,645.84 


2,384.76 


15,500.94 


1,963.56 


11,502.60 


2,384.76 


15,500.94 


2,289.68 


14,882.92 


2,384.76 


15,500.94 




13,745.84 


2,593.04 


16,854.76 


1,192.28 


5,365.26 




16,854.76 


1,909.04 


12,408.76 


2,289.68 


14,882.92 




15,500.94 


2,384.76 


15,500.94 


2,384.76 


15,500.94 


2,384.76 


15,500.94 




17,885.70 


2,384.76 


15,500.94 


2,384.76 


15,500.94 


2,384.76 


15,500.94 


2,099.36 


13,645.84 


2,202.11 


11,466.89 


2,521.26 


15,760.94 


1,848.41 


10,466.60 


1,909.04 


12,408.76 


2,289.68 


15,044.68 


2,232.48 


15,008.46 


2,384.76 


10,731.42 


2,289.68 


14,882.92 


2,384.76 


15,600.94 


2,384.76 


15,500.94 


1,623.68 


8,930.24 


2,688.00 


17,536.00 


907.00 


5,895.50 


2,688.00 


17,472.00 




4,937.40 


33.72 


1,424.64 


2,479.84 


16,118.96 


1,528.60 


9,935.90 


2,384.76 


15,500.94 


2,004.28 


13,027.82 


1,909.04 


12,408.76 


2,300.52 


15,416.70 




15,500.94 


2,004.28 


13,408.14 


1,623.68 


10,553.92 


1,623.68 


10,553.92 



131 



Music Teacher 
Music Teacher 
Music Teacher 
Music Teacher 
Music Teacher 
Music Teacher 

Physical Education 
Physical Education 
Physical Education 
Physical Education 
Physical Education 
Physical Education 
Physical Education 
Physical Education 

Reading 
Reading 
Reading 
Reading 
Reading 
Reading 
Reading 

Librarians 
Librarians 

IMC 

Program Supervisor 

IMC Teacher 

Core Evaluation Team 

Chairpersons 

Chairperson 

Chairperson 

Chairperson 

School Psychologist 

Summer Workshops 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 



9,935.90 
6.618.61 
12,069.42 
8,930.24 
2,890.06 
9,935.90 

13,991.00 
9,730.68 
13,116.18 
13,116.18 
15,261.72 
11,546.48 
13,020.74 
18,287.76 

17,472.00 
14,784.00 
14,451.64 
14,311.72 
14,311.72 
10,506.74 
14,784.00 

8,930.24 
10,499.72 



21,635.90 
6,681.64 



15,428.11 
15,457.61 
15,351.41 

15,212.75 



387.60 

32.04 
641.20 

91.60 

1,317.75 

743.40 

841.15 

870.20 

1,696.83 

91.60 
348.84 
742.40 
938.31 
729.00 
283.08 
121.41 
617.18 
758.16 

74.16 
337.20 





9,935.90 


1,909.04 


8.590.68 


2,194.44 


14,263.86 


1.623.68 


10,553.92 


114.70 


3,005.56 




9,935.90 




12,991.00 


1,718.76 


11,449.44 


2,384.76 


15,500.94 


2,384.76 


15,500.94 


2,593.04 


17,854.76 


2,099.36 


13,645.84 


2,289.68 


15,310.42 




18,287.76 


-94.95 


17,377.05 


2,688.00 


17,472.00 


2,593.04 


17,044.68 


2,593.04 


16,904.76 


2,593.04 


16,904.76 


2,011.53 


12,518.27 


2,688.00 


17,472.00 


1,623.68 


10,553.92 


1,909.04 


12,408.76 


40.37 


21,676.17 


1,909.04 


8,590.68 



1,703.86 


17,131.97 


2,066.33 


17,523.94 


1,703.86 


17,055.327 


2,199.81 


17,412.56 




387.60 




32.04 




641.20 




91.60 




1,317.75 




743.40 




841.15 




870.20 




1,696.83 




91.60 




348.84 




742.40 




938.31 




729.00 




283.08 




121.41 




617.18 




758.16 




74.16 




337.20 



132 

Teacher 1,053.40 1,053.40 

Teacher 824.40 824.40 

Teacher 801.00 801.00 

Teacher 387.60 387.60 

Teacher 33.72 33.72 

Teacher 33.72 33.72 

Teacher 1,615.67 1,615.67 

Title I 



Director 16,343.34 16,343.34 

Teacher 9,690.46 9,690.46 

Teacher 9,576.14 9,576.14 

Teacher 6,478.20 6,478.20 

Teacher 9,576.14 9,576.14 

Teacher 9,761.78 9,761.78 

Aide 3,164.80 3,164.80 

Aide 2,338.36 2,338.36 

Special Education 

Director of Special Education 24,805.24 24,805.24 

Assistant Director 20,825.16 20,825.16 

Teacher 11,171.94 11,171.94 

Teacher 14,826.82 14,826.82 

Teacher 13,051.82 13,051.82 

Teacher 15,500.94 15,500.94 

Teacher 14,921.92 14,921.92 

Teacher 8,121.20 8,121.20 

Teacher 16,854.76 16,854.76 

Teacher 14,882.92 14,882.92 

Teacher 11,198.94 11,198.94 

Teacher 10,865.92 10,865.92 

Teacher 15,691.10 15,691.10 

Teacher 14,263.86 14,263.86 

Teacher 12,069.85 12,069.85 

Teacher 2,394.72 2,394.72 

Teacher 12,408.76 12,408.76 

Teacher 16,200.27 16,200.27 

Teacher 9,380.52 9,380.52 

Teacher 12,408.76 12,308.76 

Teacher 8,869.21 8,869.21 

Teacher 14,882.92 14,882.92 

Teacher 12,599.24 12,599.24 

Teacher 15,500.94 15,500.94 

Teacher 17,472.00 17,472.00 

Teacher 12,408.76 12,408.76 

Teacher 11,198.94 11,198.94 

Teacher 16,854.76 16,854.76 

Teacher 16,854.76 16,854.76 

Teacher 14,263.86 14,263.86 

Teacher 17,472.00 17,472.00 

Teacher 12,273.88 12,273.88 

Substitute Teachers 



Substitute Teacher 3 , 943 .64 3 , 943 . 64 

Substitute Teacher 3,315.00 3,315.00 

Substitute Teacher 702.00 702.00 

Substitute Teacher 213.00 213.00 

Substitute Teacher 2,278.25 2,278.25 

Substitute Teacher 156.00 156.00 



133 

titute Teacher 312.00 312.00 

titute Teacher 754.00 754.00 

titute Teacher 416.00 416.00 

titute Teacher 208.00 208.00 

titute Teacher 633.00 633.00 

titute Teacher 1,586.00 1.586.00 

titute Teacher 286.00 286.00 

titute Teacher 78.00 78.00 

titute Teacher 2,249.41 2,249.41 

titute Teacher 26.00 26.00 

titute Teacher 754.00 754.00 

titute Teacher 702.00 702.00 

titute Teacher 2,873.00 2,873.00 

titute Teacher 955.00 955.00 

titute Teacher 700.00 700.00 

titute Teacher 156.00 156.00 

titute Teacher 620.00 620.00 

titute Teacher 52.00 52.00 

titute Teacher 338.00 338.00 

titute Teacher 455.00 455.00 

titute Teacher 702.00 702.00 

titute Teacher 1,649.00 1,649.00 

titute Teacher 576.40 576.40 

titute Teacher 286.00 286.00 

titute Teacher 52.00 52.00 

titute Teacher 300.00 300.00 

titute Teacher 1,547.00 1,547.00 

titute Teacher 468.00 468.00 

titute Teacher 78.00 78.00 

titute Teacher 786.00 786.00 

titute Teacher 6,644.62 6,644.62 

titute Teacher 468.00 468.00 

titute Teacher 286.00 286.00 

titute Teacher 26.00 26.00 

titute Teacher 26.00 26.00 

titute Teacher 1 82 . 00 1 82 . 00 

titute Teacher 52.00 52.00 

titute Teacher 364.00 364.00 

titute Teacher 495.00 495.00 

titute Teacher 2,363.00 2,363.00 

titute Teacher 26.00 26.00 

titute Teacher 695.50 695.50 

titute Teacher 1,378.00 1,378.00 

titute Teacher 1 82 . 00 1 82 . 00 

titute Teacher 42.12 42.12 

titute Teacher 143.00 143.00 

titute Teacher 340.00 340.00 

titute Teacher 80.00 80.00 

titute Teacher 66.12 66.12 

titute Teacher 1,807.00 1,807.00 

titute Teacher 52.00 52.00 

titute Teacher 1,768.00 1,768.00 

titute Teacher 78.00 78.00 

titute Teacher 2,132.00 2,132.00 

titute Teacher 260.00 260.00 

titute Teacher 26.00 26.00 

titute Teacher 754.00 754.00 

titute Teacher 1,267.00 1,267.00 



134 

Substitute Teacher 130.00 130.00 

Substitute Teacher 26.00 26.00 

Substitute Teacher 78.00 78.00 

Substitute Teacher 1,274.00 1,274.00 

Substitute Teacher 286.00 286.00 

Substitute Teacher 104.00 104.00 

Substitute Teacher 234.00 234.00 

Substitute Teacher 78. 0C 78.00 

Substitute Teacher 150.00 150.00 

Substitute Teacher 1,027.00 1,027.00 

Substitute Teacher 250.00 250.00 

Substitute Teacher 560.00 560.00 

Substitute Teacher 26.00 26.00 

Substitute Teacher 416.00 416.00 

Substitute Teacher 1,450.00 1,450.00 

Substitute Teacher 585.00 585.00 

Substitute Teacher 468.00 468.00 

Substitute Teacher 2,667.12 2,667.12 

Substitute Teacher 494.00 494.00 

Substitute Teacher 182.00 1 82 . 00 

Substitute Teacher 136.50 136.50 

Substitute Teacher 450.00 450.00 

Substitute Teacher 4,663.47 4,663.47 

Substitute Teacher 3,492.00 3,492.00 

Substitute Teacher 52.00 52.00 

Substitute Teacher 24.00 24.00 

Substitute Teacher 2,579.50 2,579.50 

Substitute Teacher 78.00 78.00 

Substitute Teacher 52.00 52.00 

Substitute Teacher 26.00 26.00 

Substitute Teacher 1,560.00 1,560.00 

Substitute Teacher 286.00 286.00 

Substitute Teacher 252.72 252.72 

Substitute Teacher 598.00 598.00 

Substitute Teacher 1,781.00 1,781.00 

Substitute Teacher 123.50 123.50 

Substitute Teacher 52.00 52.00 

Substitute Teacher 410.00 410.00 

Substitute Teacher 480.00 480.00 

Substitute Teacher 390.00 390.00 

Substitute Teacher 2 , 605 . 00 2 , 605 . 00 

Substitute Teacher 26.00 26.00 

Substitute Teacher 416.00 416.00 

Substitute Teacher 286.00 286.00 

Substitute Teacher 3,108.12 3,108.12 

Substitute Teacher 78.00 78.00 

Substitute Teacher 1 , 846 . 00 1 , 846 . 00 

Substitute Teacher 2,804.00 2,804.00 

Substitute Teacher 1,092.00 1,092.00 

Substitute Teacher 416.00 416.00 

Substitute Teacher 80.00 80.00 

Substitute Teacher 546.00 546.00 

Substitute Teacher 9,188.68 9,188.68 

Substitute Teacher 4,744.91 4,744.91 

Substitute Teacher 130.00 130.00 

Substitute Teacher 130.00 130.00 

Substitute Teacher 2,259.50 2,259.50 

Substitute Teacher 91.00 91.00 



135 

Substitute Teacher 1,668.00 1,668.00 

Substitute Teacher 3,705.64 3,705.64 

Substitute Teacher 169.00 169.00 

Substitute Teacher 178.14 178.14 

Substitute Teacher 273.00 273.00 

Substitute Teacher 5,901.43 5,901.43 

Substitute Teacher 221.00 221.00 

Substitute Teacher 390.00 390.00 

Substitute Teacher 26.00 26.00 

Substitute Teacher 1,432.00 1,432.00 

Substitute Teacher 26.00 26.00 

Substitute Teacher 105.00 105.00 

Substitute Teacher 1,794.00 1,794.00 

Substitute Teacher 1,806.00 1,806.00 

Substitute Teacher 328.00 328.00 

Substitute Teacher 234.00 234.00 

Substitute Teacher 143.00 143.00 

Substitute Teacher 312.00 3 1 2 . 00 

Substitute Teacher 312.00 312.00 

Substitute Teacher 2,119.00 2,119.00 

Substitute Teacher 1,070.00 1.070.00 

Substitute Teacher 410.00 410.00 

Substitute Teacher 2,223.00 2,223.00 

Substitute Teacher 65.00 65.00 

Substitute Teacher 26.00 26.00 

Substitute Teacher 7 , 389 . 24 7,389.24 

Substitute Teacher 26.00 26.00 

Substitute Teacher 455.00 455.00 

Substitute Teacher 416.00 416.00 

Substitute Teacher 300.00 300.00 

Substitute Teacher 1,014.00 1,014.00 

Substitute Teacher 104.00 104.00 

Substitute Teacher 1,455.00 1,455.00 

Substitute Teacher 700.00 700.00 

Substitute Teacher 221.00 221.00 

Substitute Teacher 2,327.00 2,327.00 

Substitute Teacher 2,559.00 2,559.00 

Substitute Teacher 130.00 130.00 

Substitute Teacher 45.50 45.50 

Substitute Teacher 470.00 470.00 

Substitute Teacher 78.00 78.00 

Substitute Teacher 1 94 . 70 1 94 . 70 

Substitute Teacher 450.00 450.00 

Substitute Teacher 3,843.75 3,843.75 

Substitute Teacher 350.00 350.00 

Substitute Teacher 52.00 52.00 

Substitute Teacher 1,770.00 1,770.00 

Substitute Teacher 19.50 19.50 

Substitute Teacher 1,625.59 1,625.59 

Substitute Teacher 94.25 94.25 

Substitute Teacher 19.50 19.50 

Substitute Teacher 65.00 65.00 

Substitute Teacher 816.00 816.00 

Substitute Teacher 78.30 78.30 

Substitute Teacher 22.75 22.75 

Substitute Teacher 42.25 42.25 

Substitute Teacher 1 82 . 00 1 82 . 00 

Substitute Teacher 1,020.50 1,020.50 



136 



Secretaries 

Administration 8,521.50 

Administration 2,583.00 

Coordinators' 9,089.60 

Personnel 3,550.26 

Payroll 8,954.40 

Administration 7,608.80 

Superintendent's 9,621.00 

Payroll 7,669.98 

Personnel 2,418.00 

Administration 5,523.00 

Administration 8,954.40 

Bookeeping 9,900.00 

Personnel 8,693.70 

Coordinators 7,636.30 

Career Ed. 6,269.90 

Coordinators 7,385.30 

Calls Substitutes 4,376.10 

Media Center 7,385.30 

Special Education 8,457.60 
Special Education 

Secretaries 
High School 

Principals 308.10 

Principal's 8,329.20 

Receptionist 6,850.20 

House 6,501.95 

House 7,385.30 

House 6,501.95 

House 6,501.95 

Guidance 7,841.60 

Parker Jr. High 

Secretary 8,314.80 

Secretary 6,912.10 

McCarthy Jr. High 

Secretary 6,085.30 

Secretary 6,912.10 

Secretary 2,516.80 

Byam School 

Secretary 6,085.30 

Secretary 6,903.65 

Center School 

Secretary 6,903.65 

Harrington School 

Secretary 6,085.30 

Secretary 5,138.25 

McFarlin School 

Secretary 7,220.20 

Highland School 

Secretary 5,553.60 



701.30 


9,222.80 


2,485.31 


5,068.31 


709.50 


9,799.10 


558.81 


4,109.07 


359.16 


9,313.56 


304.80 


7,913.60 


136.91 


9,757.91 


-120.87 


7,549.11 


2,076.15 


4,494.15 


1,176.78 


6,699.78 


581.71 


9,536.11 


2,554.30 


12,454.30 


-10.08 


8,683.62 


-139.25 


7,497.05 


-8.37 


6,261.53 


-172. 53 


7,212.77 


-51.45 


4,324.65 


-8.37 


7,376.93 


373.42 


8,831.02 


2,278.21 


2,278.71 



330.75 


638.85 


-23.76 


8,305.44 


21.28 


6,871.48 


433.33 


6,935.28 


-8.78 


7,376.52 


115.68 


6,617.63 


138.88 


6,640.83 


-8.89 


7,832.71 


-8.36 


8,306.44 


-7.80 


6,904.30 


-13.91 


6,071.39 


-7.80 


6,904.30 


2,818.76 


5,335.56 


515.84 


6,601.14 


241.21 


7,144.86 


113.72 


7,017.37 


- 185.12 


5,900.18 


232.40 


5,370.65 


444.30 


7,664.50 


315.12 


5,868.72 



137 



North School 
Secretary 

South Row School 
Secretary 

Westlands School 
Administrative Assistant 
Secretary 

Sub Secretaries 



7,216.30 



6,903.65 



Sub Secretary 
Sub Secretary 
Sub Secretary 
Sub Secretary 
Sub Secretary 
Sub Secretary 
Sub Secretary 
Sub Secretary 
Sub Secretary 
Sub Secretary 
Sub Secretary 
Sub Secretary 
Sub Secretary 

Position 

Custodians 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 



7,280.95 




6,085.30 




141.05 




86.82 




156.81 




1,232.25 




20.15 




29.45 




60.45 




117.14 




703.70 




29.90 




265.05 




644.80 




305.90 




gular Pay 


Overtime Pay 


10,408.71 


92.82 


11,013.60 




10,441.60 


918.08 


10,408.71 


94.34 


10,108.80 


135.66 


10,108.80 




10,108.80 


51.48 


10,408.71 


288.51 


13,079.82 




10,108.82 


139.44 


10,108.82 


225.12 


12,141.42 


480.15 


7,425.60 


290.65 


9,776.00 


124.20 


9,040.00 


497.27 


9,776.00 


841.70 


10,108.80 


565.84 


9,776.00 


106.95 


9,776.00 


862.13 


9,776.00 


44.85 


9,776.00 


915.53 


9,776.00 


103.55 


10,108.80 


199.13 


9,776.00 


1,134,94 


10,108.80 


110.20 


9,776.00 


1,041.09 


9,776.00 


121.47 


9,776.00 


139.20 


9,776.00 


1,263.86 


10,108.80 


465.46 


6,704.00 


25.80 



37.89 



255.73 



2,092.81 
-53.17 



Other 



-15.67 

-12.48 
-6.40 

-15.67 
-6.40 
-6.40 
-6.40 

-15.67 
23.09 
-6.40 
-6.40 
-6.47 
-6.40 
-6.40 
-319.20 
-6.40 
-6.40 
-6.40 
-6.40 
-6.40 
-6.40 
-6.40 
6.40 

-35.42 
-6.40 
-6.40 
-6.40 
-6.40 
-6.40 
-6.40 
-160.00 



7,254.19 



7,159.38 



9,373.76 
6,032.13 



141.05 

86.82 

156.81 

1,232.25 

20.15 

29.45 

60.45 

117.14 

703.70 

29.90 

265.05 

644.80 

305.90 

Gross Pay 



10,485.86 

11,001.12 

11,353.28 

10,487.38 

10,238.06 

10,102.40 

10,153.88 

10,681.55 

13.102.91 

10,241.84 

10,327.52 

12,615.10 

7,709.85 

9,893.80 

9,218.07 

10,611.30 

10,668.24 

9,876.55 

10,631.73 

9,814.45 

10,685.13 

9,873.15 

10,314.33 

10,875.52 

10,212.60 

10,810.69 

9,891.07 

9,908.80 

11,033.46 

10,567.86 

6,569.80 



138 



Custodian 
Custodian 
Custodian 
Custodian 
Custodian 
Custodian 
Custodian 
Custodian 
Custodian 
Custodian 
Custodian 
Custodian 
Custodian 
Custodian 
Custodian 
Custodian 
Custodian 
Custodian 
Custodian 
Custodian 
Custodian 
Custodian 
Custodian 
Custodian 
Custodian 
Custodian 
Custodian 

Substitute Custodians 
Substitute Custodian 
Subsitute Custodian 
Substitute Custodian 
Substitute Custodian 
Substitute Custodian 
Sbustitute Custodian 
Substitute Custodian 
Substitute Custodian 
Substitute Custodian 
Substitute Custodian 
Substitute Custodian 
Substitute Custodian 
Substitute Custodian 
Substitute Custodian 
Substitute Custodian 

Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 

Director Food Services 



A/V 
A/V 

School Physician 
School Physician 
School Physician 



9,776.00 


174.00 


-43.20 


9,906.80 


9,776.00 


209.02 


-6.40 


9,978.62 


9,776.00 


861.81 


-6.40 


10,631.41 


9,776.00 


745.86 


-6.40 


10,515.46 


9,776.00 


427.57 


-6.40 


10,197.17 


9,776.00 


875.32 


-35.42 


10,615.90 


9,776.00 


316.67 


-6.40 


10,086.27 


9,776.00 


119.60 


-6.40 


9,889.20 


9,776.00 


68.70 


-6.40 


9,838.30 


10,108.80 


76.41 


-6.40 


10,178.81 


4,608.00 


162.03 


1,579.20 


6,349.23 


10,108.80 


29.76 


-6.40 


10,132.16 


9,776.00 


615.89 


-6.40 


10,385.49 


9,776.00 


246.35 


-6.40 


10,015.95 


9,776.00 




-6.40 


9,769.60 


10,108.80 


1,186.69 


-6.40 


11,289.09 


9,776.00 


142.12 


-6.40 


9,911.72 


9,776.00 


513.32 


-6.40 


10,282.92 


10,108.80 


316.10 


-6.40 


10,418.50 


9,776.00 


57.00 


-6.40 


9,826.60 


9,776.00 


574.15 


-6.40 


10,343.75 


9,776.00 


716.00 


-6.40 


10,485.60 


10,108.80 


70.86 


-6.40 


10,173.26 


9,776.00 


455.71 


-6.40 


10,225.31 


5,932.80 


268.70 


3,177.24 


9,378.74 


9,776.00 


1,111.18 


132.28 


11,019.46 


2,208.00 


180.60 


-251.20 


2,137.40 


1,056.00 






1,056.00 


57.12 






57.12 


3,805.92 






3,805.92 


2,496.00 






2,496.00 


2,274.24 






2,274.24 


4,180.00 






4,180.00 


288.00 






288.00 


1,056.00 






1,056.00 


424.00 






424.00 


5,459.04 






5,459.04 


6,462.72 






6,462.72 


1,856.00 






1,856.00 


33.12 






33.12 


331.20 






331.20 


1,457.28 






1,457.28 


671.60 






671.60 


2,201.10 






2,201.10 


71.30 






71.30 


34.50 






34.50 


11,799.84 






11,799.84 


8,581.65 




192.15 


8,773.80 


13,354.60 




152.90 


13,507.50 


1,500.00 






1,500.00 


1,500.00 






1,500.00 


4,500.00 






4,500.00 



139 



Nurses 

LPN 

LPN 

LPN 

LPN 

RN Head Nurse 

LPN 

LPN 

RN 

RN 

RN 

Substitute Nurses 



Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 



Nurse 
Nurse 
Nurse 
Nurse 
Nurse 
Nurse 
Nurse 
Nurse 
Nurse 
Nurse 



Teacher Aides and Substitute Aides 
Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 
Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 
Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 
Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 
Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 
Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 
Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 
Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 
Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 
Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 
Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 
Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 
Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 
Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 
Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 
Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 
Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 
Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 
Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 
Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 
Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 
Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 
Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 
Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 
Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 
Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 
Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 
Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 
Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 
Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 
Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 
Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 
Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 



4,461.66 
5,515.66 
4,461.66 
5,515.66 
7,695.80 
4,461.66 
5,515.66 
8,893.60 
9,280.42 
7,202.30 



894.60 
2,274.75 
390.60 
768.60 
466.20 
516.60 
358.00 
176.40 
288.80 
1,667.17 



584.77 

193.72 

385.82 
2,133.90 
3,598.40 
2,317.96 
2,080.47 
3,072.07 

726.20 
1,805.99 

554.85 
2,947.60 
51.03 
1,189.57 
2,191.60 
1,995.26 
2,063.17 
4,503.10 
2,916.65 
2,484.70 
2,100.33 
2,080.32 
2,177.03 
1,801.72 

886.09 
4,036.73 

532.33 
2,126.75 
3,335.73 
2,635.20 

703.07 
2,957.20 
1,150.91 



1,112.30 


5,573.96 


28.52 


5,544.18 


888.95 


5,350.61 


58.30 


5,573.96 


1,822.46 


9,518.26 


903.84 


5,365.50 


-60.82 


5,454.84 


-81.46 


8,812.14 


64.43 


9,344.85 


1,695.74 


8,898.04 




894.60 




2,274.75 




390.60 




768.60 




466.20 




516.60 




358.00 




176.40 




288.80 




1,667.17 




584.77 




193.72 




385.82 




2,133.90 




3,598.40 




2,317.96 




2,080.47 




3,072.07 




726.20 




1,805.99 




554.85 




2,947.60 




51.03 




1,189.57 




2,191.60 




1,995.26 




2,063.17 




4,503.10 




2,916.65 




2,484.70 




2,100.33 




2,080.32 




2,177.03 




1,801.72 




886.09 




4,036.73 




532.33 




2,126.75 




3,335.73 




2,635.20 




703.07 




2,957.20 




1,150.91 



140 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 66.22 66.22 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 36.54 36.54 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 6,170.10 6,170.10 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 580.90 580.90 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,417.99 2,417.99 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 722.00 722.00 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 861.12 861.12 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 5,504.10 5,504.10 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 471.97 471.97 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,202.71 2 , 202 . 7 1 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 1,593.21 1,593.21 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 1,525.50 1,525.50 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,610.38 2,610.38 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,701.20 2,701.20 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 515.76 515.76 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,115.78 2,115.78 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 1,111.85 1,111.85 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,084.10 2,084.10 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 697.19 697.19 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 104.40 104.40 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,267.58 2,267.58 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,256.00 2,256.00 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 159.17 159.17 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,106.55 2,106.55 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,007.97 2,007.97 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 1,721.40 1,721.40 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2 , 600 . 29 2 , 600 . 29 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 1,871.52 1,871.52 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 1,135.54 1,135.54 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 1,577.45 1,577.45 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 4,680.93 4,680.93 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 1,710.45 1,710.45 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 436.76 436.76 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 1,694.51 1,694.51 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 1,131.98 1,131.98 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 13.37 13.37 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 3,066.28 3,066.28 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 1,507.95 1,507.95 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 4,472.18 4,472.18 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 4,456.69 4,456.69 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 517.75 517.75 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,810.45 2,810.45 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 4,513.44 4,513.44 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,088.00 2,088.00 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 5.22 5.22 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 1 , 842 . 22 1 , 842 . 22 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 413.71 413.71 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,165.95 2,165.95 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 1,402.64 1,402.64 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 13.37 13.37 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,443.64 2,443.64 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 1,310.40 1,310.40 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,702.90 2,702.90 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,875.75 2.875.75 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 3,156.45 3,156.45 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,479.60 2,479.60 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 95.45 95.45 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 72.09 72 09 



141 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 128.32 128.32 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 3,174.00 3,174.00 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 432.07 432.07 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 1,814.39 1,814.39 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,092.05 2,092.05 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,132.70 2,132.70 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 1,887.91 1,887.91 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 3,812.25 3,812.25 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,287.30 2,287.30 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 850.21 850.21 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 1,350.00 1,350.00 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 9.45 9.45 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,186.42 2,186.42 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 4,233.67 4,233.67 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 309.42 309.42 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 580.50 580.50 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 1,968.45 1,968.45 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,226.12 2,226.12 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2, 748. 00 2,748.00 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 1,473.10 1,473.10 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,397.95 2,397.95 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 14.58 14.58 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 247 . 00 247.00 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 47.42 47.42 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 26.73 26.73 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 1,973.74 1,973.74 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,701.20 2,701.20 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,111.10 2,111.10 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,480.38 2,480.38 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 205.02 205.02 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 3,030.56 3,030.56 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 1,130.83 1,130.83 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,861.54 2,861.54 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 88.09 88.09 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 87.17 87.17 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 3,725.40 3,725.40 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 1,560.36 1,560.36 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,660.30 2,660.30 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 13.05 13.05 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,783.96 2,783.96 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 27.95 27.95 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 676.35 676.35 

TEacher Aide and Substitute Aide 629.28 629.28 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 1,436.40 1,436.40 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 104.40 104.40 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 7.18 7.18 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,470.61 2,470.61 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 1,399.31 1,399.31 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,195.10 2,195.10 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,014.65 2,014.65 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 1,814.40 1,814.40 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 864.36 864.36 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,826.77 2,826.77 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 2,180.80 2,180.80 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 3,145.11 3,145.11 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 46.78 46.78 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 4,422.45 4,422.45 

Teacher Aide and Substitute Aide 3,873.29 3,873.29 



142 



Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 



Aide and 
Aide and 
Aide and 
Aide and 
Aide and 
Aide and 
Aide and 
Aide and 
Aide and 
Aide and 
Aide and 
Aide and 
Aide and 
Aide and 
Aide and 
Aide and 
Aide and 



Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 
Substitute 



Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 



Adult Education 



Adu 
Adu 
Adu 
Adu 
Adu 
Adu 
Adu 
Adu 
Adu 
Adu 
Adu 
Adu 
Adu 
Adu 
Adu 
Adu 
Adu 
Adu 
Adu 
Adu 
Adu 
Adu 
Adu 
Adu 
Adu 



Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 



School Committee Secy. 



2,182.99 

776.88 
1,565.30 
2,262.60 
2,800.39 

371.13 

2,283.89 

35.82 

135.79 
3,158.32 
2,802.19 
2,446.85 

668.70 
1,964.00 
1,379.00 
2,614.69 

912.60 



888.00 
1,272.00 
1,248.00 

792.00 

240.00 

445.20 
1,272.00 

240.00 

2,280.00 

36.00 

1,224.00 

888.00 
80.00 

648.00 
1,248.00 

864.00 

624.00 
1,444.94 

816.00 

648.00 
1,200.00 

384.00 
25.00 

480.00 
25.00 

1,990.75 



2,182.99 

776.88 
1,565.30 
2,262.60 
2,800.39 

371.13 

2,283.89 

35.82 

135.79 
3,158.32 
2,802.19 
2,446.85 

668.70 
1,964.00 
1,379.00 
2,614.69 

912.60 



888.00 
1,272.00 
1,248.00 

792.00 

240.00 

445.20 
1,272.00 

240.00 

2,280.00 

36.00 

1,224.00 

888.00 
80.00 

648.00 
1,248.00 

864.00 

624.00 
1,444.94 

816.00 

648.00 
1,200.00 

384.00 
25.00 

480.00 
25.00 

1,990.75 



IMC 
Aide 
Aide 

Cataloguer 
Cataloguer 
Chapter 766 Aide 
Chapter 766 Aide 

Cafeteria Workers and Substitutes 
Cafeteria Worker and Substitute 



8,104.00 
189.17 

1,618.12 
6,953.80 
8,457.60 

2,278.21 



6,580.88 



-115.20 


7,988.80 




189.17 


2,235.56 


3,853.68 


-312.94 


6,640.86 


373.42 


8,831.02 




2,278.21 



6,580.88 



143 



Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter: 
Cafeter: 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 



a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Workers and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitue 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 
a Worker and Substitute 



3,538.52 

551.08 
3,578.59 
2,064.92 
66.99 
5,224.24 
11.75 
3,297.57 
3,162.36 
3,717.36 
3,466.32 
3,487.18 
2,852.38 
2,492.01 
2,730.20 
3,052.10 
3,265.72 
3,075.94 
3,175.88 

795.50 

2,833.82 

2,855.83 

11.75 

1,670.29 

321.95 
1,813.49 
2,376.79 
2,299.42 
1,774.44 
3,400.76 

660.35 
3,406.72 
2,744.72 

169.20 
2,238.03 
3,487.18 
6,394.70 
2,700.46 
3,662.42 
2,826.02 
2,792.10 
2,747.86 
1,032.84 
3,645.60 

122.21 
2,782.53 
3,432.92 

149.25 
2,788.80 
3,406.72 

654.50 
2,733.18 
18.80 
3,508.04 
66.98 
5,547.20 
5,564.43 
3,213.23 



3,538.52 

551.08 
3,578.59 
2,064.92 
66.99 
5,224.24 
11.75 
3,297.57 
3,162.36 
3,717.36 
3,466.32 
3,487.18 
2,852.38 
2,492.01 
2,730.20 
3,052.10 
3,265.72 
3,075.94 
3,175.88 

795.50 

2,833.82 

2,855.83 

11.75 

1,670.29 

321.95 
1,813.49 
2,376.79 
2,299.42 
1,744.44 
3,400.76 

660.35 
3,406.72 
2,744.72 

169.20 
2,238.03 
3,487.18 
6,394.70 
2,700.46 
3,662.42 
2,826.02 
2,792.10 
2,747.86 
1,032.84 
3,645.60 

122.21 
2,782.53 
3,432.92 

149.25 
2,788.80 
3,406.72 

654.50 
2,733.18 
18.80 
3,508.04 
66.98 
5,547.20 
5,564.43 
3,213.23 



144 



Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter: 
Cafeter: 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 
Cafeter 



a Worker 
ia Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
ia Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
ia Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
ia Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
ia Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
ia Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
ia Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 
a Worker 



and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 
and Substitute 



441.80 
2,840.92 
2,748.55 
2,618.18 
8,826.80 
2,158.90 
32.90 
3,406.72 
2,536.74 
3,503.23 
42.30 
3,073.19 
2,582.12 

325.49 

818.40 

1,318.36 

18.80 

3,490.16 

136.30 

192.71 

210.73 
3,506.21 

933.93 
34.08 

938.79 
3,440.88 
1,292.51 

284.35 
2,736.16 
3,007.06 
3,339.78 

115.15 
1,825.93 
2,329.50 
5,734.36 
3,631.88 
3,490.16 
7,282.00 
3,391.82 
2,531.00 
3,411.08 
1,705.78 
6,076.97 
3,398.00 
89.30 
3,388.84 

674.56 

2,349.17 

18.60 

4,438.42 

3,147.46 

178.61 
9.40 
2,064.43 
1,790.70 
3,406.72 
5,420.25 

484.10 



441.80 
2,840.92 
2,748.55 
2,618.18 
8,826.80 
2,158.90 
32.90 
3,406.72 
2,526.74 
3,503.23 
42.30 
3,073.19 
2,582.12 

325.49 

818.40 

1,318.36 

18.80 

3,490.16 

136.30 

192.71 

210.73 
3,506.21 

933.93 
34.08 

938.79 
3,440.88 
1,292.51 

284.35 
2,736.16 
3,007.06 
3,339.78 

115.15 
1,825.93 
2,329.50 
5,734.36 
3,631.88 
3,490.16 
7,282.00 
3,391.82 
2,531.00 
3,411.08 
1,705.78 
6,076.97 
3,398.00 
89.30 
3,388.84 

674.56 

2,349.17 

18.60 

4,438.42 

3,147.46 

178.61 
9.40 
2,064.43 
1,790.70 
3,406.72 
5,420.25 

484.10 



145 



Cafeteria Worker and Substitute 
Cafeteria Worker and Substitute 

Department: Town Clerk/Registrars 

Position 

Town Clerk 
Sr. Clerk 
Sr. Clerk 
Sr. Clerk 
P.T. Clerk 
Registrar (T) 
Registrar 
Registrar 
Registrar 



3,735.43 






3,735.43 


2,597.02 






2,597.02 


Regular Pay 


Overtime Pay 


Other 


Gross Pay 


$14,374.68 




$850.00 


$15,224.68 


8,602.96 


$ 529.20 




9,132.16 


7,572.28 


118.00 




7,690.28 


8,434.26 


429.32 




8,863.58 


4,260.34 






4,260.34 


90.00 






90.00 


60.00 






60.00 


360.00 






360.00 


360.00 






360.00 


$44,964.52 


$1,076.52 


$850.00 


$46,041.04 



146 



Department: Highway 

Includes full time. Seasonal help, employees not employed for a full yar and employees no longer employed by this 
department. 



Position 

Superintendent of Streets 

Administrative Assistant 

Clerk (Part Time) 

Foreman 

Assistant Foreman 

Grader Foreman 

Mechanic, Heavy Equipment 

Mechanic, Heavy Equipment 

Class I, Engineering Equipment Op. 

Class I, Engineering Equipment Op. 

Class I, Engineering Equipment Op. 

Class I, Engineering Equipment Op. 

Class I, Engineering Equipment Op. 

Class I, Engineering Equipment Op. 



Class III, 
Class III, 
Class III, 
Class III, 
Class III, 
Class III, 
Class III, 
Class III, 



Spec 
Spec 
Spec 
Spec 
Spec 
Spec 
Spec 
Spec 



al Eq 
al Eq 
al Eq 
al Eq 
al Eq 
al Eq 
al Eq 
al Eq 



Op. Tr. 
Op. Tr. 
Op. Tr. 
Op. Tr. 
Op. Tr. 
Op. Tr. 
Op. Tr. 
Op. Tr. 



Dr. H'way 
Dr. H'way 
Dr. H'way 
Dr. H'way 
Dr. H'way 
Dr. H'way 
Dr. H'way 
Dr. H'way 



Regular Pay 

$20,464.44 

9,841.53 

585.68 

14,017.12 

12,045.52 

12,022.40 

7,593.60 
11,548.60 

9,301.80 
11,244.32 
11,571.00 
11,433.01 

8,279.34 
11,566.20 

11,006.96 

10,663.32 

10,739.84 

10,886.07 

7,653.60 

3,822.28 

10,221.20 

6,030.57 



Overtime Pay 



$4,424.21 
3,115.48 
4,297.45 
1,507.14 
3,697.96 
1,222.39 

910.21 
2,676.31 
1,678.89 
1,684.30 

553.62 

3,255.23 
2,893.57 
2,956.36 
1,465.58 

383.09 
2,263.74 
2,118.02 

743.52 



Other 



$1,254. 



Gross Pay 

$21,719.12 

9,841.53 

585.68 

18,441.33 

15,161.00 

16,319.85 

9,100.74 

15,246.56 

10,524.19 

12,154.53 

14,247.31 

13,111.90 

9,963.64 

12,119.82 

14,262.19 

13,556.89 

13,696.20 

12,351.65 

8,036.69 

6,086.02 

12,339.22 

6,774.09 



Class III, Special Eq 
Class III, Special Eq 
Class III, Special Eq 
Class III, Special Eq 
Class III, Special Eq 
Class III, Special Eq 
Class III, Special Eq 
Laborer (Skilled) 
Laborer (Skilled) 
Laborer (Skilled) 
Laborer (Waste) 
Laborer (Waste) 
Laborer (Waste) 
Laborer (Waste 
Laborer (Waste) 
Laborer (Waste) 
Laborer (Waste) 
Laborer (Waste) 
Laborer (Waste) 
Laborer (Waste) 
Laborer (Waste) 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 



Op. Tr. Dr. H'way 
Op. Tr. Dr. H'way 
Op. Tr. Dr. H'way 
Op. Tr. Dr. H'way 
Op. Tr. Dr. H'way 
Op. Tr. Dr. H'way 
Op. Tr. Dr. H'way 



10,649.24 
10,284.92 
4,455.92 
10,649.24 
10,608.36 
10,649.24 
6,172.88 
9,013.72 
8,907.48 
9,056.40 
9,007.20 
8,691.44 
5,652.00 
8,992.04 
8,998.45 
7,048.85 
4,755.92 
4,433.62 
5,998.40 
10,563.41 
5,394.61 
5,701.76 
9,557.88 
8,554.40 
8,561.44 
3,202.56 
8,462.29 



1,297.95 

2,379.46 

2,026.13 

1,014.34 

1,556.00 

1,207.23 

792.05 

2,151.22 

1,017.98 

1,050.62 

1,133.73 

749.20 

356.24 

993.80 

1,225.62 

731.51 

159.12 

106.08 

817.70 

2,841.54 

205.53 

712.37 

1,424.33 

65.60 

1,013.22 

1,525.35 

1,575.80 



1,737.40 



6,008.24 



3,624.40 



11,947.19 
12,664.38 

8,219.45 
11,663.58 
12,164.36 
11,856.47 

6,964.93 
11,164.94 

9,925.46 
10,107.02 
10,140.93 

9,440.64 

9,985.84 

10,224.07 
7,780.36 
4,915.04 
4,539.70 
6,816.10 

13,404.95 
5,600.14 
6,414.13 

10,982.21 
8,610.00 
9,574.66 
8,352.31 

10,038.09 



147 

Laborer 8,944.00 65.00 9,009.60 

Laborer 8,294.66 605.03 8,889.69 

Laborer 8,220.24 1,478.08 9,698.32 

Laborer 8,111.62 1,036.67 9,148.29 

Laborer 8,307.45 1,096.41 9,403.86 

Laborer 8,975.16 1,549.35 10,524.51 

Laborer 8,621.06 1,318.14 9,939.20 

Laborer 9,668.69 824.34 10,493.03 

Laborer 8,826.65 991.68 9,818.33 

Laborer 2,197.60 136.33 2,333.93 

Laborer 4,904.42 564.66 5,469.08 

Laborer (Seasonal) 2,616.64 2,616.64 

Laborer (Seasonal) 1,962.48 1,962.48 

Laborer (Seasonal) 2,475.20 2,475.20 



148 



Department: Cemetery 
Postion 

Superintendent 

Foreman 

Backhoe Operator 

Landscape Gardener 

Laborer 

Laborer P.T. 

Laborer P.T. 

Commissioner 

Commissioner 

Commissioner 

Commissioner 



Regular Pay 


Overtime Pay 


Outside 
Details 


Gross Pay 


14,675.94 






14,675.94 


12,022.40 


$1,164.67 


$647.38 


13,834.45 


8,524.80 


909.92 


421.28 


9.856.00 


8,920.00 


1,193.05 


509.56 


10,622.61 


8,486.40 


1,525.92 


152.60 


10,164.92 


1,332.00 






1,332.00 


2,148.00 






2,148.00 


100.00 






100.00 


100.00 






100.00 


67.00 






67.00 


33.00 






33.00 



149 



Department: Fire 

Position 

Chief 

Deputy Chief 

Captain 

Captain 

Captain 

Captain 

Captain 

F 

F: 

F 

F 

F 

Fi 

Fi 

F 

F 

F 

F 

F 

F 

F 

F 

F 

Fi 

F 

F 

F 

F 

F 

F 

F 

F 

F 

F 

Fi 

Fi 

F 

Fi 

F: 

Fi 

Fi 

F 

Fi 

Fi 

Fi 

F 

Fi 

Fi 

F 

F 

F 

F 

F 

F 

F 



re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 
re Fighter 



Regular Pay 


$26,252.20 


21 


681.60 


15 


100.80 


15 


100.80 


14 


933.63 


15 


100.80 


13 


581.20 


13 


124.80 


13 


124.80 


13 


124.80 


13 


124.80 


8 


497.60 


11 


483.90 


13 


124.80 


13 


124.80 


12 


893.80 


11 


483.90 


13 


124.80 


13 


124.80 


13 


124.80 


8 


497.60 


13 


124.80 


13 


124.80 


13 


124.80 


13 


124.80 


13 


124.80 


13 


124.80 


13 


124.80 


13 


124.80 


5 


131.76 


13 


124.80 


13 


124.80 


13 


124.80 


13 


124.80 


13 


124.80 


13 


124.80 


13 


124.80 


11 


483.90 


11 


483.90 


13 


124.80 


11 


483.90 


13 


124.80 


13 


124.80 


13 


124.80 


13 


124.80 


12 


893.80 


13 


124.80 


8 


497.60 


13 


124.80 


11 


483.90 


13 


124.80 


13 


124.80 


13 


124.80 


11 


034.22 


11 


527.78 



Overtime Pay 

$ 

3,504.70 
3,266.18 
4,495.46 
4,972.06 
3,876.64 
3,348.00 
4,059.20 
3,910.50 
4,005.00 

634.24 
1,830.57 
2,286.00 
3,640.50 
4,087.47 
1,896.39 
4,036.50 
4,212.00 
3,206.05 

379.76 
3,541.50 
3,271.50 
4,189.50 
3,789.00 
3,244.50 
4,189.50 
4,016.94 
3,901.50 

3,811.50 
3,825.00 
4,099.50 
3,417.00 
3,874.50 
4,365.00 
2,781.00 
2,140.65 
2,002.49 

252.00 
1,632.56 
2,563.35 
2,160.00 
4,320.00 
3,447.00 
4,280.30 
3,105.00 

387.59 
3,807.00 
1,993.08 
4,236.00 
3,699.00 
4,704.00 
1,613.73 
3,516.46 



Longevity 



Other 



Gross Pay 



$3,148.60 


$1,009.70 


$30,410.50 


2,600.91 


915.71 


25,198.22 


854.34 


726.00 


20,185.84 


1.811.60 


726.00 


20,894.66 


447.32 


726.00 


20,602.41 


854.34 


726.00 


21,653.20 


267.33 


669.00 


18,394.17 


1,180.40 


631.00 


18,284.20 


392.60 


631.00 


18,207.60 


1,180.40 


631.00 


18,846.70 


1,180.40 


631.00 


18,941.20 




351.20 


9,483.04 




550.94 


13,865.41 


392.60 


631.00 


16,434.40 


787.80 


631.00 


18,184.10 




618.90 


17,600.14 




550.94 


13,931.23 


743.72 


631.00 


18,536.02 




631.00 


17,967.80 


787.80 


631.00 


17,749.65 




373.15 


9,250.51 


392.60 


631.00 


17,689.90 


1,180.40 


631.00 


18,207.70 


787.80 


631.00 


18,733.10 


392.60 


631.00 


17,937.40 


1,180.40 


631.00 


18,180.70 


743.72 


631.00 


18,689.02 




618.90 


17,760.64 


1,180.40 


631.00 


18,837.70 




219.50 


5,351.26 


392.60 


631.00 


17,959.90 


392.60 


631.00 


17,973.40 


1,180.40 


631.00 


19,035.70 


392.60 


631.00 


17,565.40 


603.88 


631.00 


18,234.18 


1,026.38 


631.00 


19,147.18 


743.72 


631.00 


17,280.52 




550.94 


14,175.49 




550.94 


14,037.33 


349.83 


631.00 


14,357.63 




550.94 


13,667.40 


743.72 


17,062.87 




392.60 


631.00 


16,308.40 


392.60 


631.00 


18,468.40 


392.60 


631.00 


17,595.40 




618.90 


17,793.00 


1,180.40 


631.00 


18,041.20 




373.15 


9,258.34 


1,180.40 


631.00 


18,743.20 




550.94 


14,027.92 


743.72 


631.00 


18,735.52 


1,180.40 


631.00 


18,635.20 




631.00 


18,459.80 




550.92 


13,198.87 




555.32 


15,599 .56 



150 



Fire Fighter 


13,124.80 


4,189.50 


231.03 


631.00 


18,176.33 


Fire Fighter 


13,124.80 


4,175.01 




618.90 


17,918.71 


Fire Fighter 


13,124.80 


4,101.00 


392.60 


631.00 


18,249.40 


Fire Fighter 


13,124.80 


3,432.50 


743.72 


631.00 


17,933.02 


Fire Fighter 


13,124.80 


3,991.50 


392.60 


631.00 


18,139.90 


Fire Fighter 


13,124.80 


3,888.00 


1,049.03 


631.00 


18,692.83 


Fire Fighter 


13,124.80 


4,113.00 


787.80 


631.00 


18,656.60 


Fire Fighter 


13,124.80 


4,081.50 


1,180.40 


631.00 


19,017.70 


Clerk 


8,602.96 




257.63 




8,860.59 


Mechanic (Six Months) 


6,141.00 








6,141.00 



151 



Department: Police 











(Not Paid by Town) 






Position 


Regular Pay 


Overtime Pay 


Longevity 


Outside Details 


♦Other 


Gross Pay 


Chief 


$26,774.19 


$ 


$2,403.81 


$ 


$1,130.87 


$30,308.87 


Cpt. (4 months) 


6,949.60 




981.00 




408.80 


8,339.40 


Sgt. & Act. Cpt. 


$17,865.20 


2,674.11 


852.02 


2,031.57 


2,207.08 


25.629.98 


Sergeant 


15,402.20 


2,461.30 


1,844.27 


3,636.12 


680.68 


24,024.57 


Sergeant 


15,402.20 


3,613.42 


920.99 


134.25 


738.76 


20,809.62 


Sergeant 


15,402.20 


3,212.10 


1,500.85 


1,815.60 


650.48 


22,581.23 


Sergeant 


15,402.20 


3,895.46 


1,213.22 


2,621.61 


2,138.76 


25,271.25 


Sergeant 


15,402.20 


3,724.27 


1,128.47 




680.68 


20,935.62 


Sergeant 


15,402.20 


6,119.03 


920.99 


3,656.47 


1,433.56 


27,532.25 


Ptlm. & Act. Sgt. 


13,584.60 


3,653.76 


404.08 


1,558.80 


1,298.28 


20,499.52 


Patrolman 


12,976.73 


4,781.40 




1,779.36 


1,072.12 


20,609.61 


Patrolman 


13,387.10 


3,288.87 


401.78 


2,836.32 


616.86 


20,530.93 


Patrolman 


13,387.10 


231.93 


1,203.05 


746.55 


591.62 


16,160.25 


Patrolman 


13,387.10 


4,305.08 


481.85 


937.71 


642.10 


19,753.84 


Patrolman 


12,981.31 


6,800.42 




1,433.46 


1,045.88 


22,261.07 


Patrolman 


13,387.10 


324.13 


1,203.05 


1,145.43 


615.86 


16,675.57 


Patrolman 


10,988.66 


2,052.57 




274.05 


1,321.50 


14,636.78 


Patrolman 


13,387.10 


5,760.60 


96.38 


3,344.19 


840.86 


23,429.13 


Patrolman 


13,387.10 


647.92 


801.27 


3,664.86 


591.62 


19,092.77 


Patrolman 


12,969.86 


3,027.15 




2,003.49 


595.88 


18,596.38 


Patrolman 


12,969.86 


7,697.76 




1,198.86 


595.88 


22,462.36 


Patrolman 


13,387.10 


2,015.64 


401.78 




1,367.10 


17,171.62 


Patrolman 


1,413.44 




63.56 




100.96 


1,577.96 


Patrolman 


13,387.10 


1,065.37 


1,203.05 


1,245.48 


591.62 


17,492.62 


Patrolman 


12,919.65 


859.99 




78.72 


622.12 


14,480.48 


Patrolman 


11,332.55 


4,126.36 


- 


3,337.62 


403.85 


19,200.38 


Patrolman 


13,387.10 


517.78 


1,203.05 


2,878.26 


616.86 


18,603.05 


Patrolman 


13,334.60 


3,076.64 


1,203.05 


2,884.92 


642.10 


21,141.31 


Patrolman 


13,387.10 


4,214.08 


981.39 


1,457.28 


591.62 


20,631.47 


Patrolman 


12,969.86 


4,557.08 




2,201.01 


622.12 


20,350.07 


Patrolman 


13,336.62 


8,682.14 


401.78 


2,678.35 


591.62 


25,690.51 


Patrolman 


13,387.10 


4,960.26 


798.44 


983.40 


642.10 


20,771.30 


Patrolman 


12,830.68 


4,171.40 




1,515.00 


595.88 


19,112.96 


Patrolman 


13,354.27 


3,299.25 


981.39 


3,442.70 


591.62 


21,669.23 


Patrolman 


13,387.10 


2,568.94 


801.27 


39.36 


615.86 


17,412.53 


Patrolman 


13,321.03 


6,243.24 


299.41 


4,257.51 


604.86 


24,726.05 


Patrolman 


7,186.98 


328.72 




694.96 


43.90 


8,254.56 


Patrolman 


13,387.10 


6,569.59 


401.78 


3,324.51 


591.62 


24,274.60 


Patrolman 


3,423.75 


1,104.09 




1,585.65 


159.77 


6,273.26 


Patrolman 


13,387.10 


6,677.13 


401.78 


3,205.23 


616.86 


24,288.10 


Patrolman 


7,664.60 




253.26 




355.38 


8,273.24 


Patrolman 


13,387.10 


2,847.05 


1,131.09 


3,053.67 


642.10 


21,061.01 


Patrolman 


12,537.86 


5,106.62 




1,751.58 


600.96 


19,997.02 


Patrolman 


13,387.10 


7,575.09 


63.20 


3,947.70 


615.86 


25,588.95 


Patrolman 


13,387.10 




401.78 




565.38 


14,354.26 


Patrolman 


13,387.10 


5,812.82 


401.78 


3,192.66 


642.10 


23,436.46 


Patrolman 


13,387.10 


5,998.21 


801.27 


2,929.41 


1,065.86 


24,181.85 


Patrolman 


13,387.10 


5,478.57 


401.78 


2,910.66 


616.86 


22,794.97 


Patrolman 


13,387.10 


5,389.10 


631.24 


3,725.37 


615.86 


23,748.67 


Senior Clerk 


8,603.26 










8,603.26 


Senior Clerk 


8,603.26 




465.90 






9,069.16 


Custodian 


8,017.20 




465.90 






8,017.20 


Intrm. Ptlm. 




- 


- 


45.63 




45.63 


Intrm. Ptlm. 






- 




- 


40.56 



152 

Matron - - - 440.45 

Matron ... . 13.89 

Matron - - - 119.30 

Matron - - - - 688.45 

School Traffic - - - - - 166.14 

School Traffic ... . . 1,769.34 

School Traffic ... . . 2,232.96 

School Traffic - - - - 1,084.26 

School Traffic ... . . 434.19 

School Traffic - - - 2,042.06 

School Traffic - - - - 1,985.46 

School Traffic - - - - 2,150.53 

School Traffic ... . . 993.26 

School Traffic ... . . 1,457.64 

School Traffic ... . . 2,208.04 

School Traffic - - - - 1,498.26 

School Traffic - - - - - 12.78 

School Traffic - - - - 2,171.46 

* Holidays & Education Incentive 



153 



Department: Adams Library 

Position Regular 

Director $16,207.50 

Assistant Director ' 7,522.70 

Assistant Director/Jr. Assistant 5,838.73 

Assistant Director 699.84 

Branch Librarian 9,239.90 

Senior Assistant 7,407.31 

Senior Assistant 7 , 640 . 2 1 

Senior Assistant 7 , 540 . 00 

Senior Assistant 7,951.24 

Assistant 3,361.74 

Assistant 3,850.06 

Assistant 1,322.29 

Assistant 478.80 

Assistant 3,321.83 

r. Assistant 780.73 

Assistant 3,565.98 

r. Assistant 2,177.12 

r. Assistant 1,383.67 

r. Assistant 5,849.86 

r. Assistant 158.30 

r. Assistant 3,508.80 

r. Assistant 3,805.76 

r. Assistant 1,298.48 

r. Assistant 1,082.00 

Clerk 2,879.60 

Clerk 7,258.08 

Clerk 4,262.64 

Clerk 6,546.81 

Aide 594.20 

Aide 712.09 

Aide 1,442.38 

Aide 313.83 

Aide 217.50 

Aide 267.76 

Maintenance 4,372.50 

Maintenance 9,628.96 



Overtime 



(13.64 



Gross Pay 

$16,207.50 

7,522.70 

5,838.73 

699.84 

9,239.90 

7,407.31 

7,640.21 

7,540.00 

7,951.24 

3,361.74 

3,850.06 

1,322.29 

478.80 

3,321.83 

780.73 

3,656.98 

2,177.12 

1,383.67 

5,849.86 

158.30 

3,508.80 

3,805.76 

1,298.48 

1,082.00 

2,879.60 

7,258.08 

4,262.64 

6,546.81 

594.20 

712.09 

1,442.38 

313.83 

217.50 

267.76 

4,372.50 

9,942.60 



154 
Department: Selectmen 



Position 


Regular Pay 


Overtime Pay 


Chairman-Selectman 






Selectman 






Selectman 






Selectman 






Selectman 






Administrative Assistant 


$11,956.99 




Senior Clerk 


8,071.30 


$1,334.69 


P.T. Clerk 


1,162.41 




P.T. Clerk 


1,238.04 




P.T. Clerk 


580.28 




Town Planner 


124.46 




Purchasing Agent 


678.18 




CETA Coordinator 


186.46 





Gross Pay 

$ 1,374.99 

1,124.97 

999.96 

999.96 

999.96 

11,956.99 

9,937.65 

1,162.41 

1,238.04 

580.28 

124.46 

678.18 

186.46 



INDEX 

Appointed Town Officials 3 

Board of Appeals 96 

Board of Assessors 93 

Board of Registrars 110 

Board of Selectmen 7 

Cable Television Advisory Committee 110 

Celebrations Committee 108 

Cemetary Commission 97 

Civil Defense Commission 91 

Conservation Commission 101 

Council on Aging 103 

Cyrstal Lake Restoration Committee 110 

Department of Veterans' Services 95 

Dog Officer 101 

D.P.W. Study Committee 98 

Elected Town Officials 3 

Environmental Advisory Council 105 

Fire Department 91 

Gas Inspector 101 

General Information 2 

Health Department 92 

Highway Department 90 

Historical Commission 107 

Historic District Commission 109 

Home Rule Advisory Committee 104 

Housing Authority 106 

Insect Pest Control 103 

Inspector of Animals 101 

Inspector of Buildings Ill 

Jury List 13 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School 86 

Northern Middlesex Area Commission 105 

Park Department 97 

Planning Board No Report Submitted 

Plumbing Inspector 1 00 

Police Department 88 

Public Libraries 96 

Recreation Commission 99 

Revolutionary War Bicentennial Celebrations Commission 108 

School Committee 75 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 101 

Sewer Commission 107 

Town Accountant 112 

Town Aide 103 

Town Clerk 12 

Warrant for Annual Town Meeting April 2, 1977 and April 25, 1977 16 

Warrant for Special Town Meeting May 12, 1977 24 

Results Annual Town Election April 2, 1977 26 

Annual Town Meeting April 25, 1977 28 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting May 2, 1977 34 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting May 5, 1977 36 

Special Town Meeting May 12, 1977 38 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting May 12, 1977 40 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting May 16, 1977 64 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting May 19, 1977 67 

Town Warrant for Special State Primary May 24, 1977 69 



Town Warrant for Special State Election June 21, 1977 70 

Warrant for Special Town Meeting June 30, 1977 71 

Special Town Meetingjune 30, 1977 72 

Warrant for Special Town Meeting December 13, 1977 73 

Special Town Meeting December 13, 1977 73 

Town Employees' Salaries 118 

Treasurer and Tax Collector 112 

Tree Department 102 

Varney Commission 110 

Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee 95 

Wire Inspector 100 

Youth Center Advisory Committee 99 



This report was prepared from individual imputs from all Town departments and 
committees and coordinated by the Board of Selectmen. The funds, $10,000 were 
appropriated at the 1977 Annual Town Meeting as line item_264_ under Unclassified 
Departments. Each booklet cost $1.55.